Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Finally finished and processed my first test roll yesterday. Nothing "post-worthy" but it can have good tonality, and seems better in soft lighting. Nice fine grain. The film feels "old-time" when handling and loading onto a reel, as it seems thicker than today's films, so it loads easily. I exposed at box speed (80) and processed per their table in Rodinal 1:50 (I normally use 1:25 for Ilford films.) - so I was outside my normal routine. The negatives seemed a bit thin. I think I'll do the next roll in DDX.

If I get the hang of it in the rest of the 5 rolls I may add this to my standard films, but for now I still prefer PanF - but it's worth supporting Ferrania to have another film supplier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally finished and processed my first test roll yesterday. Nothing "post-worthy" but it can have good tonality, and seems better in soft lighting. Nice fine grain. The film feels "old-time" when handling and loading onto a reel, as it seems thicker than today's films, so it loads easily. I exposed at box speed (80) and processed per their table in Rodinal 1:50 (I normally use 1:25 for Ilford films.) - so I was outside my normal routine. The negatives seemed a bit thin. I think I'll do the next roll in DDX.

If I get the hang of it in the rest of the 5 rolls I may add this to my standard films, but for now I still prefer PanF - but it's worth supporting Ferrania to have another film supplier.

 

Normal - Ilford B&W film negatives are much thinner than Kodak counterparts. I like it because Ilford film is easier to roll onto the plastic development tank reels and dries much faster after the washing of the film is done. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

A friend of mine handed me yesterday five rolls of first batch of Ferrania P30 films. I put the first one in my M3 camera - stay tuned for results. I will develop this film myself but likely not using one of the described standard methods. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shot two films of the alpha P30 batch. Very rich in contrast but under retention of the main grey tonal range. But you need to be quite careful with the exposure - more compared to other B&W films. Had an issue with scratches on the films which was confirmed by Ferrania as sporadic production issue with the alpha batch. Removed the horizontal scratches in PP. 

Development: Rodinal (1:50) followed by Xtol (1:2) in two-step development procedure

 

Leica M3, CV 28/2

 

 

Leica M3, Leica 50/2 Summicron-M (Vers. V):

 

 

 

Leica M3, Leica 90/2.8 Tele-Elmarit (Version I)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shot two films of the alpha P30 batch. Very rich in contrast but under retention of the main grey tonal range. But you need to be quite careful with the exposure - more compared to other B&W films. Had an issue with scratches on the films which was confirmed by Ferrania as sporadic production issue with the alpha batch. Removed the horizontal scratches in PP. 

Development: Rodinal (1:50) followed by Xtol (1:2) in two-step development procedure

Fantastic B&Ws Martin - some PP'ing here and there, but excellently done. No wonder you teach film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ran some test shots on a grey-card target and used a densitometer.  I tried rating the film at various speeds, but even at ISO 25 I still could not get the film to record threshold density at Zone I.

 

Then I tried for Zone V and was consistently unable to get the appropriate density there, without thereby producing a totally blank negative at Zone I.

 

In sum, I either got no shadows, or no mid-tones.

 

I was mainly using my normal Ilford DDX mix (1+4).  I then tried the same thing with the recommended dilution (1+5), but with little success.

 

In the end I just got frustrated working as one of Ferrania's unpaid beta-testers, and placed my rolls in the refrigerator for the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ran some test shots on a grey-card target and used a densitometer.  I tried rating the film at various speeds, but even at ISO 25 I still could not get the film to record threshold density at Zone I.

 

Then I tried for Zone V and was consistently unable to get the appropriate density there, without thereby producing a totally blank negative at Zone I.

 

In sum, I either got no shadows, or no mid-tones.

 

I was mainly using my normal Ilford DDX mix (1+4).  I then tried the same thing with the recommended dilution (1+5), but with little success.

 

In the end I just got frustrated working as one of Ferrania's unpaid beta-testers, and placed my rolls in the refrigerator for the moment.

 

As I mentioned above, this P30 film is a bit tricky. I didn't even bother to expose for zones - I only used a light meter app with reflective light measurement from my cellphone and added one stop of longer exposure when I used the orange filter (I shot with Leica M3 which has no internal meter - next time I will shoot with my M6 using this film). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My findings of this P30 film so far:

 

+ very low and fine grain (which I personally like)

+ film does not curl and is quite flat after drying - ideal for scanning

+ vintage feel of the photos taken with this film

 

- alpha batch had some scratch issues with the films (might derive from defective cartridges or some issue during manufacturing).

- richness in contrast can easily lead to under- or overexposure. Controlling it is difficult - best is to average out the scene with high contrast elements for fairly correct exposure

- a bit limited in grey scale - Ilford FP4 in comparison has a much wider grey scale tonal range but is much less contrasty.

- very limited in shadow details (probably comes with having the high contrast advantage)

 

I will add later how the P30 film does for silver gelatin printing which I will examine soon. 

 

Overall I really like this film so far - it is different than most other B&W films which I have used before and leads to photos reminding me of early 20th century B&W prints but with low grain. Regarding development, it seems quite similar to other low speed B&W films. After I developed my first roll of P30 film, my first thought was that I did something wrong - a lot of blanked out areas on the negative. Turned out that this is a film property with the high contrast (black) areas. More tests with some rolls of the second batch of produced P30 film will follow. 

Edited by Martin B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm wondering when Ferrania P30 will be available at retailers, even Ferrania's online shop is 'closed'.

 

later in December, with 120 format expect next year...

The contrast levels vary meaningfully depending on what lens is used.  e.g., my 75mm summilux captured a LOT of midtones

 

75 lux

 
50 dr cron

 

 

 
50 dr cron
Edited by A miller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice! How are you developing?

Thanks. I developed vicaiously through my NYC lab. No need to reinvent the wheel with results this good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...