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jmahto

Does anyone uses exposure bracketing for HDR

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I will be frank. I have never used the exposure bracketing. I always expose for the highlight and lift shadows. Although you get noise in the shadows, it is quick and painless. Most of the times the shadow noise doesn't even show up in print. However, I recently tried combining multiple exposure bracketed shots for HDR and got good results. I also found that "auto" bracketing is very useful. It rattles off multiple exposures by the single shutter press. Now it is one of my user preference.

 

I was wondering whether anyone uses this routinely.

 

(Posting in M240 since HDR is very much sensor capability related).

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Thanks for the ideas. I haven't used it, and considering a recent image that I'm now having problems editing, this is what I could consider. 

 

How quick are the multiple exposures? What kind of moving object do you think it would be fast enough for? 

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Thanks for the ideas. I haven't used it, and considering a recent image that I'm now having problems editing, this is what I could consider.

 

How quick are the multiple exposures? What kind of moving object do you think it would be fast enough for?

The multiple exposures go as fast as camera can fire. However, object movements will spoil it. I would use it for static scenes with very high DR. I experimented with various settings and 5 shots with (-4,-2,0,+2,+4) worked for me to cover a really difficult scene (sunlit outdoors and shady indoors).

 

After that I simply used Photoshops merge to HDR feature, converting it to 32bit and then adjusted gamma and exposure to get a very flat looking file saved as 16bit. Further tweaking was done in LR. Result was similar to shadow lift without any shadow noise.

Edited by jmahto

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HDR? If my memory serves me that was a fad back in about 2008. When sensors had poor dynamic range.

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. I experimented with various settings and 5 shots with (-4,-2,0,+2,+4) worked for me to cover a really difficult scene (sunlit outdoors and shady indoors).

 

 

But that is how HDR is done and has always been done, a sequence of shots that are a set ratio of exposure apart, unless I have mistaken what you said? If a camera has an HDR setting it simply takes a sequence of bracketed exposures and combines them in camera. But it is simply an extension of the photographer using bracketed exposures to choose the single best exposure, and instead combining them all manually or with software to create an HDR image. So the answer to your question 'does anybody use exposure bracketing for HDR?' is yes they do and always have ever since the fad became popular.

Edited by 250swb

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Isn't the setting in the M called exposure bracketing? Introduced in the M8.2 but trickled down to the M8 in later firmware.

 

Kind of the velvet painting of the digital world.

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I use exposure bracketing to make HDR images. It's great for architectural/property photography. HDR allows one to see a view, in addition to an interior.  I shoot a 5 shot bracket and combine images out of camera.

HDR has a bad reputation because many users go overboard with the effects, and the shot is easily seen as HDR. The trick is to use HDR commercially without it being seen. HDR is a tool.

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But that is how HDR is done and has always been done, a sequence of shots that are a set ratio of exposure apart, unless I have mistaken what you said? If a camera has an HDR setting it simply takes a sequence of bracketed exposures and combines them in camera. But it is simply an extension of the photographer using bracketed exposures to choose the single best exposure, and instead combining them all manually or with software to create an HDR image. So the answer to your question 'does anybody use exposure bracketing for HDR?' is yes they do and always have ever since the fad became popular.

Yes. I have used exposure bracketing before without using the auto bracketing feature. I simply point the camera to sky (or a different brightness area), lock the exposure and shoot in order to avoid clipping highlights.

 

First time I am trying out the auto bracketing. And my reference to HDR was not for the cartoonish looking photos but simply a tool for normal looking photos that have huge DR. An example is interior of the room with view outside window without using supplemental light.

Edited by jmahto

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Yes. I have used exposure bracketing before without using the auto bracketing feature. I simply point the camera to sky (or a different brightness area), lock the exposure and shoot in order to avoid clipping highlights.

 

First time I am trying out the auto bracketing. And my reference to HDR was not for the cartoonish looking photos but simply a tool for normal looking photos that have huge DR. An example is interior of the room with view outside window without using supplemental light.

 

 

The multiple exposures go as fast as camera can fire. However, object movements will spoil it. I would use it for static scenes with very high DR. I experimented with various settings and 5 shots with (-4,-2,0,+2,+4) worked for me to cover a really difficult scene (sunlit outdoors and shady indoors).

 

After that I simply used Photoshops merge to HDR feature, converting it to 32bit and then adjusted gamma and exposure to get a very flat looking file saved as 16bit. Further tweaking was done in LR. Result was similar to shadow lift without any shadow noise.

 

 

Thanks Jayant; that's helpful 

 

I'll try the five shot method suggested here. 

 

I haven't learnt about using 32 bit and adjusted gamma; new things for me to try 

 

Much appreciated 

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For still shots on a tripod, worth a try.  I also shoot for highlights and get noise in the blacks when the DR is very wide.  I use curves in PS to fill them in

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I will be frank. I have never used the exposure bracketing. I always expose for the highlight and lift shadows. Although you get noise in the shadows, it is quick and painless. Most of the times the shadow noise doesn't even show up in print. However, I recently tried combining multiple exposure bracketed shots for HDR and got good results. I also found that "auto" bracketing is very useful. It rattles off multiple exposures by the single shutter press. Now it is one of my user preference.

 

I was wondering whether anyone uses this routinely.

 

(Posting in M240 since HDR is very much sensor capability related).

 

Not with the M, but with the 645Z which is pretty much always on a tripod, I bracket constantly.  Rarely, if ever, for HDR, but I've found its very valuable in difficult, high DR scenes to have options around which exposure to choose as the starting point for processing.  

Edited by Tailwagger

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There are some new programs out there for HDR other than PS, that are much better at rendering images, so they don't look like an Elvis velvet painting. I have not tried doing any HDR with my 240's. I have tried with some success using my Fuji X T-1's. 

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I use it from time to time when I can't quite encompass the whole DR in one exposure. The case that comes to mind is deep in the forest on a sunny day when I want blue sky and detail in trees. It is more work and so I do it as a last resort.

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Lightroom CC does a good job on HDR processing for urban night images, so long as you don't go with the automatic tonality, which makes pictures look very weird in my opinion. Tripod is a must for such HDR shooting, but the results with my M-P were very impressive. Showed some at the Art Complex Museum in MA in a group show last year, and they were well liked.

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Yes, I use it quite a bit. I typically will use a 3 shot bracket with 2 exposure difference between. Sometimes, I will use just 2 exposures and use photoshop for exposure blending rather than traditional HDR. This is especially helpful when exposing for the sky and using another exposure for the foreground. I've lately started using more luminosity masking. Nothing very complex but some simple brightness/contrast luminosity makes a huge difference.

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Frequently.

 

Sunrise over Skyway by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Tombi HDR by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Chile Austral by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Storm Over Detroit by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Frequently.

 

Sunrise over Skyway by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Tombi HDR by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Chile Austral by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Storm Over Detroit by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

Beautiful gallery. It looks so natural. Not like overdone HDR. 

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Frequently.

 

 

Sunrise over Skyway by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

 

Tombi HDR by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

 

Chile Austral by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

 

Storm Over Detroit by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

 

 

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse by Jeff Parsons, on Flickr

Very nice work, fotofool!  I'm envious of your talent.

 

Mike

 

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Well, after I wrote my first post, I have started using 7 bracketing shots in difficult light conditions. I have found that they are great help in getting exposure right. I haven't used it for HDR though.

 

Now I have a user preference that pins ISO to 200 and enables 7 bracketed shots spreading -6 to +6. There is no way I can get the exposure wrong.

 

I shot this sunrise today. On a side note I was surprised to get a sunstar from my 90mm macro-elmar-M @f22. There was no flare or ghosting. Love this lens.

Edited by jmahto

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