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Well, THAT was....random!


adan
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Grabbed the yellow foil tube, ripped it open, popped the film into the SWC. Meter to 320, shoot pictures, practicing my scale-focusing technique.

 

Got home, popped the roll out, into the darkroom, "TMax 400 - hmm, HC-110, 4.5 minutes 72°F normal" Developed away.

 

Poured out the developer - looked like a slasher movie - red gore everywhere. What the....? Got the film into the stop bath, and then grabbed for the backing paper in the trash.

 

"KODAK EKTAR 100"

 

(My mistake of course - but gosh-darn Kodak for giving up on the old color-coded individual wrappers. Green for 400 B&W, Red for CN, Purple for Plus-X/Tmax 100. I've loaded and exposed the wrong film before, in the distant past - never unintentionally run a roll through the wrong process before, though.)

 

Went ahead and fixed - there are images there. Dense reddish base, of course. Finished as for B&W, wash and Photoflo.

 

Actually - for underexposed two stops, run through the wrong chemicals for the normal (wrong) time at the wrong temperature - the results are amazingly usable! I wanted B&W, and that's what I got.

 

Not God's gift to the Zone System for tonality, perhaps, but certainly within the functional range for gritty street shots. A bit on the contrasty side - and with ZERO latitude. Shots that were right on the money scanned very well - but 1/2 stop under were really thin on shadow detail. Bit of sludging on some frames - if they were important shots, I'd rewash and use C-41 stabilizer instead of Photoflo for the final bath. Very fine grain.

 

Interesting that Ektar 100, usually known for bright reds, in this case reproduced red/orange/pink very dark (DOGGS kiosk was pink, drink crates red, traffic cone orange).

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LOL Andy, well done.

If there is anything that a new entrant to this dark side can glean from this post it is that it can and does happen to the best of us.

Great result under the circumstances.

Gary

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Grabbed the yellow foil tube, ripped it open, popped the film into the SWC. Meter to 320, shoot pictures, practicing my scale-focusing technique.

 

Got home, popped the roll out, into the darkroom, "TMax 400 - hmm, HC-110, 4.5 minutes 72°F normal" Developed away.

 

Poured out the developer - looked like a slasher movie - red gore everywhere. What the....? Got the film into the stop bath, and then grabbed for the backing paper in the trash.

 

"KODAK EKTAR 100"

 

(My mistake of course - but gosh-darn Kodak for giving up on the old color-coded individual wrappers. Green for 400 B&W, Red for CN, Purple for Plus-X/Tmax 100. I've loaded and exposed the wrong film before, in the distant past - never unintentionally run a roll through the wrong process before, though.)

 

Went ahead and fixed - there are images there. Dense reddish base, of course. Finished as for B&W, wash and Photoflo.

 

Actually - for underexposed two stops, run through the wrong chemicals for the normal (wrong) time at the wrong temperature - the results are amazingly usable! I wanted B&W, and that's what I got.

 

Not God's gift to the Zone System for tonality, perhaps, but certainly within the functional range for gritty street shots. A bit on the contrasty side - and with ZERO latitude. Shots that were right on the money scanned very well - but 1/2 stop under were really thin on shadow detail. Bit of sludging on some frames - if they were important shots, I'd rewash and use C-41 stabilizer instead of Photoflo for the final bath. Very fine grain.

 

Interesting that Ektar 100, usually known for bright reds, in this case reproduced red/orange/pink very dark (DOGGS kiosk was pink, drink crates red, traffic cone orange).

Ha, I know that cart. The wrong film, the wrong chemicals and returning chemicals to the wrong bottle must be some sort of film darkroom triumvirate that one encounters no matter how long one's been doing this. Nice recovery.

 

s-a

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  • 2 weeks later...

SWC = 38mm Biogon.

Gorgeous camera. I've wanted one of those since I leafed through Lee Friedlander's book, "America By Car." I believe he shot the whole thing with a SWC. Every time one shows up used at my local dealer, I'm usually experiencing a temporary crisis of liquidity, and someone else snags it.

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