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Going full Leica...


Nick Bedford
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Germans are also funny about such things. My eye surgeon in Bonn was referred to as Herr Professor Doctor Holtz.

Noch nicht mal Dr.Mult.?
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Peter H

But, and there's always a but...     If we restrict our comments to compliments, we get very little that's meaningful. It's a very real issue on this forum, and it's another reason why some people don't post photos here.   We ought to be able to accommodate both positive as well as negative comments.  No need for rudeness I agree, but a bit more honesty should be welcome. It's true that some people find it hard to make their criticism sound constructive, but should we really be quite so sen

FlashGordonPhotography

Comments like this annoy me. Unnecessary, unhelpful and borderline insulting.   A photograph of a beautiful woman does not mean it's not a beautiful photograph either. Interpretation of what is and isn't beautiful is really a personal decision. If someone thinks a picture is beautiful, then, to them, it is. You may not like this photo, which is a perfectly valid choice. . You could have pointed out what you feel could be improved or why it doesn't tickle your fancy. A quote followed by a sweep

FlashGordonPhotography

Well I am a professional in the work sense. i have many cameras (20 at last count) and I think the M is excellent for portraits. I can frame pretty accurately but even so shoot a bit loose and crop in post. The M works will with flash triggers (unlike my Sonys, with their proprietary elongated shoe). I also like shooting people with the RF rather than a viewfinder which show a wide open view of the world.   I've posted this one before but this is with an M, 90mm @f4 and a Godox 360 with socked

Posted Images

 

I used the grip with a flash socket once, but I noticed a big drawback, it is often too dark in the studio to work with the EVF especially when the lens is put to F/8. 

 

 

My advice, work with what you are comfortable with and gives you pleasure.

 

 

You have control over the EVF in the menu. You can turn off the exposure preview function of the EVF, so it's always bright.

 

Your last sentence it spot on, IMHO.

 

Gordon

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It seems obvious from reading this thread that most of us own many more cameras than lexica or similar reference works.

 

Otherwise, it would become quite clear that "profession" has a widely accepted meaning; in the context we are using it here, it implies a formal training and possibly some exams. 

 

In Switzerland you can't put the term "photographer" on your calling card or on the door of your place of business unless you have acquired the formal qualifications to do so. 

 

A "professional photographer" would be one who has learned the profession of a photographer.

 

It is nothing to do with how one earns his living. It is nothing to do with the quality of your work.

 

 

In the US "professional" means someone that performs a service for a fee.

 

If you sell art that you make, you are a professional artist. If you only produce art, you are an amateur artist. 

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I didn't mention that I'm an in-house photographer as part of my graphic design work. I do a lot of product photography, some staff portraits, and other things, so I totally get the "deliver a solid image no matter what you're photographing" ideal. "Professional" by day, amateur by night?

 

In previous years I shot parties, the occasional wedding, band portraits and the like, so I'm no stranger at all to the ideals of a professional. My first job was for a university campus in my first six months of photography using a Canon 50D and 17-55mm F/2.8 zoom.

 

I kinda wish you could say amateur and not have it immediately associated with learner or mediocre, but rather, "for the love of".

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"Professional" by day, amateur by night"

 

Nah Professional by day ... nothing changes just because it's dark out.  Just cause you trying new things and learning your still a pro at night IMHO;-)

 

​and you can take that roll of seamless paper off you taxes....but check that with your accountant

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You have control over the EVF in the menu. You can turn off the exposure preview function of the EVF, so it's always bright.

 

Your last sentence it spot on, IMHO.

 

Gordon

 

That indeed is true, but then the EVF image becomes understandably noisy and sluggish.

Edited by platel
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In the US "professional" means someone that performs a service for a fee.

 

If you sell art that you make, you are a professional artist. If you only produce art, you are an amateur artist. 

Saw an america movie yesterday. The FBI man said: "I am a trained proffessional! " later he showed to be the bad guy....

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...I kinda wish you could say amateur and not have it immediately associated with learner or mediocre, but rather, "for the love of".

 

+1 

robert

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................

 

I kinda wish you could say amateur and not have it immediately associated with learner or mediocre, but rather, "for the love of".

 

 

I know what you mean, but then, why worry about how other people interpret your interest in photography? 

 

I suppose it comes back to self esteem, but it really shouldn't should it?

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I kinda wish you could say amateur and not have it immediately associated with learner or mediocre, but rather, "for the love of".

 

'Amateur' used to and should still refer to someone who does something for the sheer love of it - its been corrupted by people referring to 'amateurish' which is a pity IMO. FWIW I know some extraordinarily good amateur photographers who take superb images. At least one has always refused to sell any of his images preferring to supply an odd print, if requested, for a charitable donation. He said that he made his (good) living in other ways and wanted to keep his photography as an enjoyable hobby. I fully understand his reasoning; the apparent kudos of the professional designation held no interest.

 

[A somewhat 'professional' attitude to being an amateur - a man of integrity.]

Edited by pgk
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'Amateur' used to and should still refer to someone who does something for the sheer love of it - its been corrupted by people referring to 'amateurish' which is a pity IMO. ................

 

 

Yes, but it comes from a time when only wealthy people were able to indulge in hobbies or do anything much that didn't contribute to staying alive one way or another.  It is a haunted word.

 

Now far more people have leisure time and a bit of cash. Language changes for a reason, and if we want a word that expresses professional qualities without implying a purely commercial relationship, we'd better think of a new word." Amateur" is no longer the right one.

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I've just resigned to saying, "I'm a photographer", and hoping they don't say, "Oh, so you do weddings?"

 

 

 

Hahah.

 

I know what you mean, but then, why worry about how other people interpret your interest in photography? 

 

I suppose it comes back to self esteem, but it really shouldn't should it?

Edited by jaapv
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Hello:

3 years ago, I moved over to Leica M (initially the M9 and now exclusively M240) for about 95% of my billable shooting.  Portraits, industrial, architecture, run-and-gun, with and without speedlights and/or studio strobes.  Tethering when necessary.  Works extremely well for all scenarios. Image quality of the optics is second to none and the updated features of the M240 (compared to the M9), make it a much more useable "pro" camera IMO.

 

My concerns?  

-I will not completely dump Canon, because at times I need the speed/convenience of a zoom with mounted TTL speed light.  Don't yet own an SL.  

-I like the security of having 2 card-slots for redundancy, and again I don't yet own an SL which has that feature.

-My biggest concern is the lack of back-end support from Leica (and Sony for that matter).  I'd never buy a Sony mirrorless because of the horror story testimonials from people that have had to go thru a Sony repair scenario. My M, 35mm 1.4 and 75mm 2.5 both went down in the past with aperture issues.  My 75 was out of commission for 2 months.  My 35 was out of commission for 6 weeks.  Had to rent lenses at my own expense to cover the focal lengths.  When my Canon 24-105 went down and CSP had to order a part from Japan, they shipped me a loaner free of charge, all for a $100/year CPS membership.  That kind of backend support is imperative for most pro shooters, unless you have the cash to have 2 or 3 backups of everything.  How many backup M240 or SL systems can one guy afford

 I'm just saying.
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Leica does offer a higher tier of service aimed towards working pros - guaranteed turnaround times, loaner gear, etc.  But IIRC it's only for the S series and it costs something absurd like $3,500 US (per body?).

 

When I had Canon gear I used CPS pretty often.  Free cleanings, repair centers on both coasts, loaner/evaluation gear, etc.

Edited by Joshua Lowe
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Best advice i have heard. Erfahrener is right.

I am best known as an 8x10 landscape photographer but now I make more and better pictures with the monochrom (CCD) and summilux 50.

more not because I am hip happy, just because I can respond quickly to opportunities.

Better because it is.  I still love silver contacts but Monochrom quality is stunning.

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Hello:

3 years ago, I moved over to Leica M (initially the M9 and now exclusively M240) for about 95% of my billable shooting.  Portraits, industrial, architecture, run-and-gun, with and without speedlights and/or studio strobes.  Tethering when necessary.  Works extremely well for all scenarios. Image quality of the optics is second to none and the updated features of the M240 (compared to the M9), make it a much more useable "pro" camera IMO.

 

My concerns?  

-I will not completely dump Canon, because at times I need the speed/convenience of a zoom with mounted TTL speed light.  Don't yet own an SL.  

-I like the security of having 2 card-slots for redundancy, and again I don't yet own an SL which has that feature.

-My biggest concern is the lack of back-end support from Leica (and Sony for that matter).  I'd never buy a Sony mirrorless because of the horror story testimonials from people that have had to go thru a Sony repair scenario. My M, 35mm 1.4 and 75mm 2.5 both went down in the past with aperture issues.  My 75 was out of commission for 2 months.  My 35 was out of commission for 6 weeks.  Had to rent lenses at my own expense to cover the focal lengths.  When my Canon 24-105 went down and CSP had to order a part from Japan, they shipped me a loaner free of charge, all for a $100/year CPS membership.  That kind of backend support is imperative for most pro shooters, unless you have the cash to have 2 or 3 backups of everything.  How many backup M240 or SL systems can one guy afford

 I'm just saying.

 

 

 

Register as a professional photographer with Leica, you will get an account number (with suitable proof etc)...When I send lenses in for 6bit coding or any other issue (like dropping my 90mm F2 ASPH and chipping the front lens) they repaired and shipped in back in a week, same with my Summilux due back today for 6bit encoding, sent it end of last week..OK its slower than my 1DX repairs but not too slow

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I think you should go back to a big DSLR. There it nothing but inconvenience with Leicas for your kind of work.

.

I agree with pico here. For set studio work a DSLR is a better choice.

However I still do use my Leicas in a studio environment for sessions that are perhaps more relaxed or demand that the camera and model are moving, i.e.: some fashion shoots. But I nearly always back up those sessions with using a DSLR too.

Outside the studio / strobe environment then the choice of camera can go either way, rangefinder or DSLR.

However for me the M cameras are for focal lengths of 50mm or less, ( I rarely use even a 50mm on my M's ), over 50mm it's DSLR all the way in whatever environment one is shooting.

​But in the end I'm saying here what works for me, just use what works for you and your style of shooting and don't listen too much as to how everyone else does it. We are all different in how we work……….

Edited by petermullett
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