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AnakChan

Has anyone tried bulb at 60 sec?

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Hi all,

 

I'm curious if anyone has tried bulb mode with its max 60 sec exposure with their M240? I'm thinking of trying to take snapshots of my vacuum tube amps but I'm wondering if anyone who's tried it have noticed any sensor heat creeping.

 

Is there any concern of heat damage to the sensor?

 

Cheers.

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What is your concern? External heat or long exposure sensor heat?

I believe electric circuit including sensor has overheat protection built in.

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What is your concern? External heat or long exposure sensor heat?

I believe electric circuit including sensor has overheat protection built in.

Sensor heat resulting in :-

 

1) noise affecting the shot

2) damaging the sensor (which you've appeared to have answered this concern)

 

 

What external heat are you referring to? Is that something I need to watch out for too?

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I've done it. Not a problem. You will get a 60s noise reduction black frame exposure right after.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I doubt Leica would have allowed 60 secs if there was any risk of damage.... I shot a lot of long exposures on my M9 - not so many with the M yet- but I have no concerns about doing it. I just wish I could make longer than 60 sec exposures...

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I'm curious if anyone has tried bulb mode with its max 60 sec exposure with their M240? I'm thinking of trying to take snapshots of my vacuum tube amps but [...]

 

Oh, just over-amp the tubes. A lot!

 

Reminds me of the time many years ago when I loaned an inexpensive digital camera to a fellow going to Tibet. He returned with the camera broken, saying, "A student made me a charging adapter to the camera, and it got REAL BRIGHT for a second."

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