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jaapv

Leica T/TL/TL2 - the Image thread

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What customer is interested in dovetails and laminates? These images are showing the furniture in the context of interiors and as such they are very good, compared to the rather sad stuff I normally see in magazines (possibly not the ones you work for).

I agree that they probably wouldn't cut it for a technical carpentry magazine as they do not go into the details, but I doubt that that is the destination.

Edited by jaapv

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Unless you have experience in product marketing you probably should keep your comments to yourself rather than attacking someone that is trying to help the poster. You can't tell a thing about the carpentry from those photos and only a fool would pretend to do so. Are the drawer joints dovetail? Is the material solid wood, plywood veneer, particle board with a plastic coating? You have no idea from those photos Besides that the poster said he made furniture so you are assuming it is only cabinetry, which he never stated. Carpenters can make sofas, chairs, tables ,etc. depending on their skill level and desires.

 

 

 

Just for the record, I have never criticized anyone's photography, nor am I suggesting that I could have done better but as someone with a lot of years of marketing experience selling products in magazines, I do have an eye for what works well and what doesn't. My suggestion was that some of you so called experts would help him with the lighting which burns out the highlights and leaves the shadows lacking detail.

 

 

 

You are welcome to think those photos are great, it just tells me that your knowledge and skill in product marketing photography are non-existent.

 

 

Product marketing is about creating emotion and a connection with the product. You don't need a picture of a dovetail joint to achieve that.

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Aw, come on. This looks like a pack rat lynch mob. John is telling it as he sees it. Okay, disagree with him, but how about we just pack in the personal insults. John will hang himself (or not) by his own postings. He may have a point about the images above. I thought they were okay, but if I took them (after I'd scraped my ego off the floor) I'd certainly listen to some one who took the time to comment.

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thanks everyone for the feedback, both positive and negative.

 

thanks especially to barjohn for pointing out where i was completely off...

 

as a result, i have adjusted the exposure on my shots to compensate for the lacking details in both highlights and shadows. since i've done all shots as an multiple exposure series, i was able to improve this point. Also i've improved my edits for the flat surfaces to show more structure and contrast.

 

I'm not planning on changing the style of pictures, as a "context of interiors" was required for my assignment, These images are shot at f/8 or narrower rather than f/2 to provide this context.

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I hate to be critical of someone else's work but here is my impression:

1. The lighting is really bad. In the dark wood pieces the grain is not visible and there is no detail making it looks plastic and artificial (assuming it is real wood). There is little detail in the shadows and many highlights are blown. There is a lack of texture and contrast.

2. In some photos it is difficult to know what the subject is because there are multiple pieces of furniture in the shot. Is it the chair, the sofa or the bookcase? Is it the table or the sofa? There is no use of DOF to let us know what you want us to look at.

3. On the white pieces I can't tell whether they are wood or plastic laminate on particle board? One says quality the other says cheaply made.

4. In the shot with the table and chairs, Is the subject the chairs, the table with the highlighted edge blow out and the shadow detail missing or the blown out white cabinets in the far distance? What does the top of the table look like? That is what most people buying a table look to first.

 

Maybe some professionals will help you out with suggested lighting and how to get more pop out of the pictures. The T with its slow lenses and APS-C sensor may not be the best tool for the job as it lacks the ability to obtain shallow DOF unless you are on top of the subject. I hope these suggestions help.

 

There is truth in barjohn's comments e.g. the shadow areas lack detail and could certainly be improved thus improving the texture … and anyone who cannot see this needs their bumps feeling. Barjohn has offered some constructive criticism and SirPiet has taken same on board and improved the images. I was impressed by the compositions and the good verticals in the photos … but not so impressed by the lighting and lack of shadow detail. However, maybe would have been better to address the shortcomings a little more subtly.

 

I participate in a photo society's monthly critique where some participants fail to see the most obvious shortcomings in both their and others' images submitted. Fact is, we can all be a bit blind and can all benefit from others' points of view. And if such criticism results in improved images then we all learn.

 

There is nothing wrong in constructive criticism … much better to criticise than to adopt an 'Emperor's new clothes' philosophy.

 

Happy New Year to all

 

dunk

Edited by dkpeterborough
typo

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>>You have a lot of opinions, however , your photography doesn't support those. <<

I actually like the pictures too but that comment is really unjustified. And I've seen plenty of good shots by John as well.

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Looking at the table with chairs image, I can see the end-grain on the laminated pieces used for the table top. Had it been an artificial top, edge banding would have shown a continuous wood grain. If SirPiet lowered the exposure value in this image, that information would have been lost. Sometimes it's necessary to blow highlights - especially when the highlights contain no information to begin with - in order to convey the intended message.

 

Even with the lost shadow detail of the coffee-table that John considers a weak point in the image, the image is in keeping with the carpenter's desire to show his design work in context with the room it was made for...as well as his expertise in craftsmanship. Besides, aren't magazine photos captioned to emphasize the obvious, as well to fill in the uncertainties?

 

I think the essay successfully meets the carpenter's desire to show off his skill in customized and contextualized design and his carpentry craftsmanship. I doubt if SirPiet's photographs could have covered both intentions for each and every composition, and the very deep depth-of-field in all of his shots emphasizes the design expertise of the craftsman.

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2015 already brought us a beautiful sunbird, some great furniture and a wonderful bee.

 

Now I would like to invite you to have a look at my 3-day exploit with the T.

What I know for sure is that the T was able to capture light and colors in a natural way and the pictures show what I saw and would like you to see. Moreover, with the touchscreen and dials the T is perfectly suited for my battered hands - so this was a pleasure.

 

All critique is welcome - positive and negative!

 

JPEG with a little PP : https://www.flickr.com/photos/129647056@N02/sets/72157650066834212/

 

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thanks everyone for the feedback, both positive and negative.

 

thanks especially to barjohn for pointing out where i was completely off...

 

as a result, i have adjusted the exposure on my shots to compensate for the lacking details in both highlights and shadows. since i've done all shots as an multiple exposure series, i was able to improve this point. Also i've improved my edits for the flat surfaces to show more structure and contrast.

 

I'm not planning on changing the style of pictures, as a "context of interiors" was required for my assignment, These images are shot at f/8 or narrower rather than f/2 to provide this context.

 

I had another look at your images above, and I do think it would be a mistake to change the overall character and colour palette of the images - they give a very cool atmosphere which goes well with furniture and similar design catalogue images. Certainly, they don't seem to suffer for being taken with a "modest" camera like the T

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A few pictures taken on a road trip this past summer. The one with the cowboy hat was taken at sunset in Glacier National Park in Montana. The other two were taken in Crater Lake National Park in Oregon. One in the middle of the night and the other at sunrise. All 3 were taken with the Summicron 23mm.

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a few shots with the w/a zoom 11-23 .... this is a NICE lens ....... I never got this quality with Nikons huge 14-24 high end zoom ....

 

all from today during en exciting trip to get the car washed..... and at an unusual garden centre on the way back .....

Edited by thighslapper

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