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Leica T/TL/TL2 - the Image thread

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Copenhagen Airport .... 11pm, waiting for my next flight !

With my "T" and his Vario-Elmar T 18-56 ...

 

Yvan

Edited by Le Comte Y

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I have a low light 'monochrome' project in mind for a recently acquired secondhand Leica T but needed to compare results using the full range of ISO settings before commencing same. Thus the following preliminary experiment using a 60mm Macro Elmarit R to determine which high ISO settings might be usable.

 

Subject is tarnished scalpel blade; window light with white card reflector and black card gobo to smooth out the highlight reflections on the blade edge; straight max quality JPEGS; camera set to B&W HC film mode … 8 consecutive exposures from ISO 100 to ISO 12500. All exposures taken at f5.6 using aperture priority. On APS-C format there is no need to stop the lens down further for this type of flat (ish) close-up subject.

 

 

 

ISO 100

 

 

 

ISO 200

 

 

 

ISO 400

 

 

 

ISO 800

 

 

 

ISO 1600

 

 

… cont'd …

Edited by dkpeterborough
typo

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… continuation …

 

 

 

ISO 3200

 

 

 

ISO 6400

 

 

 

 

ISO 12500

 

 

Conclusion … the T's high ISO capability is excellent ... probably better in monochrome than in colour … max ISO 12500 is usable but better results at up to ISO 3200.

 

The project I have in mind will use the camera's built-in flash … but with a filter on the flash … hence need to use high ISO.

 

The Viso 'T' enables fairly easy focus in low light because it has a 'sweet spot' where the focused image seems to 'jump' with a shimmering moiré effect. Both Jono Slack and Mike Evans remark on this 'in focus shimmer' effect in their T reviews.

 

Best wishes

 

dunk

Edited by dkpeterborough
typo

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Testing the T w. 18-56 + EV

 

Thus far it's working out fine, but finding proper focus manually is not always easy. Advice is welcome. Happy holidays!

 

D-lux 6

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Zoc_MbHz_i6-XJTc8DhFstMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

 

T

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/72_lPRIfUlCrzwltnlnB-NMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

Edited by Hunebed

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I've been shooting some furniture for a carpenter recently, i'm trying to complete this assignment with my Leica T exclusively.

 

 

 

 

 

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I hate to be critical of someone else's work but here is my impression:

1. The lighting is really bad. In the dark wood pieces the grain is not visible and there is no detail making it looks plastic and artificial (assuming it is real wood). There is little detail in the shadows and many highlights are blown. There is a lack of texture and contrast.

2. In some photos it is difficult to know what the subject is because there are multiple pieces of furniture in the shot. Is it the chair, the sofa or the bookcase? Is it the table or the sofa? There is no use of DOF to let us know what you want us to look at.

3. On the white pieces I can't tell whether they are wood or plastic laminate on particle board? One says quality the other says cheaply made.

4. In the shot with the table and chairs, Is the subject the chairs, the table with the highlighted edge blow out and the shadow detail missing or the blown out white cabinets in the far distance? What does the top of the table look like? That is what most people buying a table look to first.

 

Maybe some professionals will help you out with suggested lighting and how to get more pop out of the pictures. The T with its slow lenses and APS-C sensor may not be the best tool for the job as it lacks the ability to obtain shallow DOF unless you are on top of the subject. I hope these suggestions help.

Edited by barjohn

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I hate to be critical of someone else's work but here is my impression:

1. The lighting is really bad. In the dark wood pieces the grain is not visible and there is no detail making it look plastic and artificial (assuming it is real wood). There is little detail in the shadows and many highlights are blown. There is a lack of texture and contrast.

2. In some photos it is difficult to know what the subject is because there are multiple pieces of furniture in the shot. Is it the chair, the sofa or the bookcase? Is it the table or the sofa? There is no use of DOF to let us know what you want us to look at.

3. On the white pieces I can't tell whether they are wood or plastic laminate in particle board? One says quality the other says cheaply made.

4. In the shot with the table and chairs, Is the subject the chairs, the table with the highlighted edge blow out and the shadow detail missing or the blown out white cabinets in the far distance? What does the top of the table look like? That is what most people buying a table look to first.

 

Maybe some professionals will help you out with suggested lighting and how to get more pop out of the pictures. The T with its slow lenses and APS-C sensor may not be the best tool for the job as it lacks the ability to obtain shallow DOF unless you are on top of the subject. I hope these suggestions help.

 

 

Respectfully, i don't agree. They are lovely photos, and I'm sure the carpenter will be very happy with them.

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Assuming these photos are intended to sell his work rather than self enjoyment, I suggest you ask yourself the question would looking at one of these photos motivate me to hire this carpenter to build my custom furniture? The photos should say "quality," great craftsmanship, uniques skills, etc. It isn't about the photos or the photographer, it about the message they are intended to convey. If you would hire this carpenter on the basis of these photos then it works for you.

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Assuming these photos are intended to sell his work rather than self enjoyment, I suggest you ask yourself the question would looking at one of these photos motivate me to hire this carpenter to build my custom furniture? The photos should say "quality," great craftsmanship, uniques skills, etc. It isn't about the photos or the photographer, it about the message they are intended to convey. If you would hire this carpenter on the basis of these photos then it works for you.

 

 

The photos would certainly make me want to call the carpenter and have further conversations with him....

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These are simply very good product shots. All the arty-crafty stuff about shallow DOF and lighting is neither here nor there.

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Assuming these photos are intended to sell his work rather than self enjoyment, I suggest you ask yourself the question would looking at one of these photos motivate me to hire this carpenter to build my custom furniture? The photos should say "quality," great craftsmanship, uniques skills, etc. It isn't about the photos or the photographer, it about the message they are intended to convey. If you would hire this carpenter on the basis of these photos then it works for you.

 

I like the photography and the carpentry, I think both are very good.

 

John, can you remember the last time you had something positive to say about anything ?

 

You have a lot of opinions, however , your photography doesn't support those.

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I hate to be critical of someone else's work but here is my impression:

1. The lighting is really bad. In the dark wood pieces the grain is not visible and there is no detail making it looks plastic and artificial (assuming it is real wood). There is little detail in the shadows and many highlights are blown. There is a lack of texture and contrast.

2. In some photos it is difficult to know what the subject is because there are multiple pieces of furniture in the shot. Is it the chair, the sofa or the bookcase? Is it the table or the sofa? There is no use of DOF to let us know what you want us to look at.

3. On the white pieces I can't tell whether they are wood or plastic laminate on particle board? One says quality the other says cheaply made.

4. In the shot with the table and chairs, Is the subject the chairs, the table with the highlighted edge blow out and the shadow detail missing or the blown out white cabinets in the far distance? What does the top of the table look like? That is what most people buying a table look to first.

 

Maybe some professionals will help you out with suggested lighting and how to get more pop out of the pictures. The T with its slow lenses and APS-C sensor may not be the best tool for the job as it lacks the ability to obtain shallow DOF unless you are on top of the subject. I hope these suggestions help.

 

I disagree with all points. I like all the shots and appreciate that the poster shared them here.

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I like the photography and the carpentry, I think both are very good.

 

John, can you remember the last time you had something positive to say about anything ?

 

You have a lot of opinions, however , your photography doesn't support those.

 

Unless you have experience in product marketing you probably should keep your comments to yourself rather than attacking someone that is trying to help the poster. You can't tell a thing about the carpentry from those photos and only a fool would pretend to do so. Are the drawer joints dovetail? Is the material solid wood, plywood veneer, particle board with a plastic coating? You have no idea from those photos Besides that the poster said he made furniture so you are assuming it is only cabinetry, which he never stated. Carpenters can make sofas, chairs, tables ,etc. depending on their skill level and desires.

 

Just for the record, I have never criticized anyone's photography, nor am I suggesting that I could have done better but as someone with a lot of years of marketing experience selling products in magazines, I do have an eye for what works well and what doesn't. My suggestion was that some of you so called experts would help him with the lighting which burns out the highlights and leaves the shadows lacking detail.

 

You are welcome to think those photos are great, it just tells me that your knowledge and skill in product marketing photography are non-existent.

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