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Who still uses a handheld meter?


NZDavid
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euston

For the kind of photography that I do, I find that the built-in meters in digital cameras generally do a good job if one uses them carefully.   With my M4 I only shoot b/w nowadays and don’t usually need a meter but I carry my Weston Master V with me and still use it when the light is tricky. It still seems to be accurate enough for my purposes. Here’s an example of a mixed light scene which I did find it helpful to meter.     Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden co

david strachan

I use a Gossen Lunasix, Pentax Spotmeter and others.  But one of my favourites is the Zeiss Ikophot...old tech, very accurate, no batteries with incident screen...just rather nice in a small pocketable leather shape... Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren ode

jaapv

Sorry if I am stating something you know (and if you do some reader of your post may not), but you do realize that you are measuring the light falling onto the scene, not the light reflected by the subject. Which means that the meter is pointing backwards, over your shoulder so to speak.   The vintage Gossen Sixtomat is a very interesting meter to use. Not only does it measure quite well, but being a Selenium meter it does not need a battery, it has a rolling curtain for incident light meterin

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I use a Gossen Digisix 2, usually when moving between shade and sun to just check the stops that have moved to save using the Leica light meter in camera when the change is frequent. I don't use the auto setting and prefer to set with arrows/dot and a pan around.

 

I have and do use to see what the light is for a more accurate exposure. It gets used less than I thought it would to be honest.

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I only said "still" because it seems some photographers reckon proper exposure doesn't matter so much in the digital age; they will just adjust it later in PP. I'm used to slide film so would prefer to get it right first time if poss. Pleased to see handheld meters are not totally out of fashion!

 

IMHO digital requires more exact exposure then a negative. It acts rather like slide film. Yes it's possible to make up for errors in PP but usually with a loss of quality.

 

Correct exposure - or rather intended exposure - is a pretty fundamental part of what we do but you're right, a lot of photographers don't give it much thought beyond making sure they get the OK signal in their viewfinder!

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I have a Gossen Variosix F2. Which i must admit to buying and never actually using.

I've had 3 of these over the years but found that they chew through batteries at an alarming rate.

 

I now normally use the tiny Voigtlander VC2 meter with my IIIg or if I forget that I use the rather good "myLightMeter" app with my iPhone. It works very well and exposure metering compares well with the VC2, Sekonic L208, and L758.

 

Pete.

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I'm using a Sekonic as well with my M3--about 90% of my pix i take an incident reading.

 

With my R4, I'm using it too to second-guess its internal reflected meter readings.

 

I'd like to memorize the Sunny 16... Well, actually that parts memorized.

 

We should have a contest to establish similar slogans for all the other F stops:

 

"Shady 8". . . Or whatever. Is it 8? See what I mean!?

Edited by Brenton C
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For the last several years, I've been using an M3 with a Sekonic L-758DR meter. Since acquiring an M 240 in December, I've continued using the meter.

 

The meter gives me incident readings, which the M 240 can't. It allows me to get more precise spot readings. And it enables me to quickly and easily translate a reading into exposure at different ISOs, f stops and shutter speeds.

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I've got meters in every draw in the house, but the meters in my camera bags are Gossen DigiPro for large format, a Sekonic L308 for medium format, and a Sekonic L208 for 35mm. The later may be replaced with my new hand held meter, my phone. I downloaded the app 'Light Meter Tools' and it is both pretty accurate and comprehensive with a wide range of apertures, ISO's, ND factors, spot metering not to mention DOF tables for multi formats and even a Sunny 16 reminder table. At just £1.80 it could just be the best value meter available.

 

Steve

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For the last several years, I've been using an M3 with a Sekonic L-758DR meter. Since acquiring an M 240 in December, I've continued using the meter.

 

The meter gives me incident readings, which the M 240 can't. It allows me to get more precise spot readings. And it enables me to quickly and easily translate a reading into exposure at different ISOs, f stops and shutter speeds.

 

Back in the Spiratone Era one could buy a type of filter that went temporarily on the lens, allowing you to use the camera as an incident meter. You could probably DIY something like this, but a handheld meter is more convenient. Probably has a coolness factor with the ladies too, huh?

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For the kind of photography that I do, I find that the built-in meters in digital cameras generally do a good job if one uses them carefully.

 

With my M4 I only shoot b/w nowadays and don’t usually need a meter but I carry my Weston Master V with me and still use it when the light is tricky. It still seems to be accurate enough for my purposes. Here’s an example of a mixed light scene which I did find it helpful to meter.

 

 

 

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As time goes on I'm becoming more and more of a minimalist and carrying as little gear as I can manage with. So no handheld meter. The built in meter, or even guesstimated exposure, allows for a test shot, histogram check allows for fine tuning with sufficient accuracy fot producing an intended ('accurate') exposure. I've worked like this since buying an M8 not that long after it appeared - no problem with exposures/files to date. If you enjoy using one then great, but for me nothing like essential.

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I have used a Sekonic Studio Deluxe L 28c2 for the past 35 years, then a Weston Master 745 IV as well as the Leica MR and the little Voigtlander VC.

While the Voigtlander beats all for portability and unobtrusiveness as it slides on top of all my Leica bodies, I find the Sekonic faster and easier to handle, very good reflected light capability, no battery needed, whereas the VC is a direct spotmeter, needs battery. When I want a more precise reading, I'll take out the Weston, a bit more cumbersome but beautifully made; occasionnally needs a CA, though. I got mine after reconditioning through Ian Partridge and am perfectly happy with it. Most of the time, though, I take a couple of readings to check the range of stops between light and dark areas and adjust according to my experience as I walk and shoot.

At all times, I try and guess the reading before using the meters: good practice and I am rarely off now. I shoot B&W, by the way.

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