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Who still uses a handheld meter?


NZDavid
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I just shot some picture inside a converted barn. Interiors are always tricky. I used the M9 and Sekonic 308b meter in incident mode. Very pleased with the exposures. While the built-in meter on M-series Leicas is pretty good, and it is easy enough to take multiple shots and bracket or tweak exposures in PP, I find getting the exposure as accurate as possible first time really helps. With film of course it saves shots but even with digital it saves time.

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euston

For the kind of photography that I do, I find that the built-in meters in digital cameras generally do a good job if one uses them carefully.   With my M4 I only shoot b/w nowadays and don’t usually need a meter but I carry my Weston Master V with me and still use it when the light is tricky. It still seems to be accurate enough for my purposes. Here’s an example of a mixed light scene which I did find it helpful to meter.     Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden co

david strachan

I use a Gossen Lunasix, Pentax Spotmeter and others.  But one of my favourites is the Zeiss Ikophot...old tech, very accurate, no batteries with incident screen...just rather nice in a small pocketable leather shape... Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren ode

jaapv

Sorry if I am stating something you know (and if you do some reader of your post may not), but you do realize that you are measuring the light falling onto the scene, not the light reflected by the subject. Which means that the meter is pointing backwards, over your shoulder so to speak.   The vintage Gossen Sixtomat is a very interesting meter to use. Not only does it measure quite well, but being a Selenium meter it does not need a battery, it has a rolling curtain for incident light meterin

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I think the question should be who uses a handheld meter. It's been a long time now since cameras with built in meters were a novelty!

 

I use one for incident readings. I find they work best for certain subjects or light conditions. Mine is a Minolta Autometer and I only have the incident dome for it so I can't use it in reflected mode. It also works as a flashmeter.

 

Personally I think a good handheld (incident) meter is an essential accessory.

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Personally I think a good handheld (incident) meter is an essential accessory.

 

I concur, and since my old Gossen finally died, I am looking for another. I have tried / am trying the better of the iPhone apps, which work quite well, and are "quite" accurate, but they run into the problem of all iPhone apps, including the camera, with is the low visibility in general of the screen on a bright sunlit day.

 

I know, of all the times when you don't need a light meter, a bright sunlit day would be the obvious example.

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Hello Everybody,

 

Built in meters have certain advantages such as when using them for close-up's, with BTL flash & for using them with certain types of lens designs.

 

Altho, in many other instances there is no significant difference whether a built in or a separate hand held meter is used.

 

There are also some situations where a separate hand held meter does have advantages.

 

While a built in meter often gives you a single reading: A hand held meter can often make that same reading while simultaneously offering a variety of alternative perspectives & options.

 

Best Regards,

 

Michael

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I think the question should be who uses a handheld meter. It's been a long time now since cameras with built in meters were a novelty! ...

 

I only said "still" because it seems some photographers reckon proper exposure doesn't matter so much in the digital age; they will just adjust it later in PP. I'm used to slide film so would prefer to get it right first time if poss. Pleased to see handheld meters are not totally out of fashion!

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When shooting film I occasionally drag one along to take one incident reading at the start of my shooting (which may last for a couple of hours while I am hiking or walking), and compensate with Sunny 16 adjustments the rest of the session. It feels so unencumbered to not deal with a meter most of the time.

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I always use one with B&W film regardless if the camera has a built in meter or not. A Pentax Digital Spotmeter is my carry everywhere meter.

The selective meter on an M6 is not quite selective enough for me so when I recently bought a M film camera, the world was my oyster.
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Hello Everybody,

 

Welcome to the Forum Julian.

 

Post Processing not withstanding: I would think: The better the quality of the original captured image: The more that can be done with it & the better the finished image.

 

I look at a separate light meter as a way of providing a lot of additional options in a small, light weight, easy to carry package

 

Best Regards,

 

Michael

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1 or 5 degree spotmeter + zone system placement / exposure / development

 

Yup, thats what its all about for me too. Once you get the hang of it, a handheld meter can be quite quick, preselecting either your aperture / shutter, quick spot measurement, adjust cameras and shoot. Ensures a beautifully exposed neg every time. Finetuning sensitivity and development is easy with a bit of experience too.

 

Julian

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Use a grey card, perhaps?
The MR4 averages over the FOV of a 90mm lens, so you can use the frame preview lever to show the metering area. With experience you can judge the tonal variations over the metered scene and adjust from the indicated settings.

 

Yes, sometimes I measure the inside of my hand as a substitute for a gray card.

But I was thinking more of a small white cap that could be put on before the measurement window of the MR4.

Maybe a cap made ​​of light plastic from something like a tablet bottle could just fit?

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I have bought in a do it yourself shop an A4 sized sheet of semi transparent foil. I use a square of abot 8 by 8 cm in front of the lens of my M for that purpose. If you PM me your address, I will send you a similarly sized piece of it.

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I have bought in a do it yourself shop an A4 sized sheet of semi transparent foil. I use a square of abot 8 by 8 cm in front of the lens of my M for that purpose. If you PM me your address, I will send you a similarly sized piece of it.

 

That's very kind of you.

You have received a personal message from me.

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