Jump to content

Taming of the split-ring


wjkotze
 Share

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Split-rings are very versatile but they have two problems. The one is excessive lug wear especially when using the sharp edge variety. The second is the annoying tendency for the two split-ends to get stuck on either the lug or the strap-ends, preventing the strap from sliding smoothly. When this happens I normally rotate the ring so that the split-ends are inside the strap-end but it is only a matter of time before that section moves around again. I am using a solution for some time that works very well. I take a small bead and feed that through the ring until it reaches the opening between the two split-ends where it seats firmly. The open section of the split-ring is now covered by the bead.There is very little movement of the ring through the lug and most of the movement is through the strap-end. It is actually surprising how much smoother the complete strap movement is.

 

One can obviously use a less conspicuous color like black, but I have decided to add a touch of red to my all black outfit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another option is to replace round split rings with a Nikon triangle split ring. It does not rotate and the ends are inside the strap. They are available online at the Nikon Parts Store for under $3 each. Shipping is quite a bit more, so I ordered a couple.

Edited by KanzaKruzer
Link to post
Share on other sites

Two good solutions. I too dislike using split rings because of the wear and tear they cause. Nikon minimise the wear anyway by using a stainless steel insert inside the lugs, however Leica continue with the same design and they were ruined in one of my M8s by one of their "premium" (in their imagination if not in fact) straps.

 

Of course, the Nikon triangles may not be big enough for your chosen strap...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I followed your advice and inserted a small bead into the split ring and the ever-annoying problem just disappeared. I've been putting up with this little annoyance since I first picked up a camera in 1965 and have tried countless ways to fix it, but this bead has proven an exceptionally elegant solution. From one photographer to another: THANK YOU. Well done.

Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, if anyone is still worried about damaging their Leica lugs, try a switch to solid brass split-rings. The brass rings, being of softer metal, wear, but don't seem to cause wear on the lugs, and can easily be replaced if necessary. Mine have been on my M9 for nearly four years now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Nikon triangular split rings are by far the worse for causing wear on Leica lugs. The standard Leica strap has a round ring that matches the inner curve of the lugs, so the load is taken evenly over the maximum area and nothing can dig in or cause stress points. But the lug sits above the point of the triangle on two tiny contact patches when using a Nikon ring, putting all the weight and wear into the outer edges of the lug, the 'point' of the triangle doing nothing to support the camera. It may not make much difference to the modern Leica lugs, but on the chrome plated brass lugs of M3's etc. it can cause a lot of wear very quickly.

 

And while a brass ring is softer than stainless steel, and unlikely to cause wear, it is only soft and flexible when 'new'. From then on it becomes work hardened, which is what is happening each time the camera's weight it taken or the ring runs through the lug, and work hardening makes brass brittle and weak.

 

 

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

What you say about the brass rings sounds interesting, but in this case, practical application seems to prove otherwise. Where do you get this idea that the brass rings become "work hardened"? And if it is so, do you have any idea of how long that process might go on before lug-wear becomes an issue? Who has ever tested such a thing?

Well, I guess, I have, and I have to disagree with your assessment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Where do you get this idea that the brass rings become "work hardened"? And if it is so, do you have any idea of how long that process might go on before lug-wear becomes an issue? .

 

Because I work with brass every working day. How can I know how long it takes, I don't know what you do with your camera or how you do it. Look, this is simple metallurgy, look it up on Wikipedia.

 

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a slightly different approach to both keeping the split ring in place and protecting the camera. I install some shrink rap tubing over then end - install the ring on the camera then shrink the shrink rape. It secures the ring in place and gives a layer of protection for the camera.

Link to post
Share on other sites

250SWB

It may take many years, perhaps decades, to work the brass in these rings to the point where they become unsafe to use. We shouldn't discount their usefulness. The rubber on our tires becomes unsafe after a time too, but the rubber gives us many years of safe, reliable service. I've been using brass rings for many years and have never had one fail. Your input may discourage people who might otherwise have tried and benefitted from this idea. It certainly does saves wear on the camera lugs.

By the way, in resizing brass rifle cartridges, I've experienced what you've explained,

but cartridge brass usually experiences far more "work" than do these split-rings.

Link to post
Share on other sites

250SWB

It may take many years, perhaps decades, to work the brass in these rings to the point where they become unsafe to use. We shouldn't discount their usefulness. The rubber on our tires becomes unsafe after a time too, but the rubber gives us many years of safe, reliable service. I've been using brass rings for many years and have never had one fail. Your input may discourage people who might otherwise have tried and benefitted from this idea. It certainly does saves wear on the camera lugs.

By the way, in resizing brass rifle cartridges, I've experienced what you've explained,

but cartridge brass usually experiences far more "work" than do these split-rings.

 

If you feel comfortable recommending brass brass strap rings to other people then I'm not going to argue, it is your level of jeopardy that people have to deal with. I just try to take a step back and say I may take risks with my camera equipment, but only by knowing what I know, not what I am told. Too many posts start or end with 'it has never happened to me'.

 

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to be arguing such a trivial point, but for the low cost of a few brass rings, I think people would do well to experiment a bit. They have proven excellent on my cameras. And I'm sure that those who do try them will now respect your cautiousness when they do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
Split-rings are very versatile but they have two problems. The one is excessive lug wear especially when using the sharp edge variety. The second is the annoying tendency for the two split-ends to get stuck on either the lug or the strap-ends, preventing the strap from sliding smoothly. When this happens I normally rotate the ring so that the split-ends are inside the strap-end but it is only a matter of time before that section moves around again. I am using a solution for some time that works very well. I take a small bead and feed that through the ring until it reaches the opening between the two split-ends where it seats firmly. The open section of the split-ring is now covered by the bead.There is very little movement of the ring through the lug and most of the movement is through the strap-end. It is actually surprising how much smoother the complete strap movement is.

 

One can obviously use a less conspicuous color like black, but I have decided to add a touch of red to my all black outfit.

Where did you bought the bead?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...