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Anatomy of the Leica M8

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I always chickened out by the looks through it's finder, which is quite a bit smaller than the one of the F3, F5 and D3, which are gorgeous.

 

Yet again

I found what may be a fix, not got one yet but working on the M8 magnifier which I use this has potential: Nikon Dk-17M Magnifying Eyepiece: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

 

I have looked at the D7000 great reviews, on paper a steal but in real life it looks and feels like a toy.

I even find the F100 a bit "flimsy" after the F4. Light tight boxes fashioned from bricks inspire confidence and a steady hand at slow speeds.

Edited by chris_livsey
spulling

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Yet again I found what may be a fix, not got one yet but working on the M8 magnifier which I use this has potential: Nikon Dk-17M Magnifying Eyepiece: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

 

I have looked at the D7000 great reviews, on paper a steal but in real life it looks and feels like a toy.

I even find the F100 a bit "flimsy" after the F4. Light tight boxes fashioned from bricks inspire confidence and a steady hand at slow speeds.

 

I have the DK17M and also a 1.4 Leica magnifier.

I don't use both, as they do magnify the view indeed, but make it a lot more difficult, to see the edge of the frame (metering and framing becomes an issue).

 

The DK17M only fits Nikons professional bodies with big, round viewfinder attachment. It will not fit a D7000 without hacking something together. I hated this aspect already, when I wanted, to improve the tiny DX viewfinder back with a D300.

 

If you prefer bricks, have a closer look at the D2x (more than the D2h and slower at speed, but a beautiful 12MP sensor). It has a similar burst rate, like the D7000, but weights more, which you might like ;-)

 

Man, is this discussion OT !

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Man, is this discussion OT !

 

Yes but

the D2x is twice the price, probably more than twice the camera admitted, but the exercise is "interesting toy" if the bugs bites the D3 will be a goer - as soon as the D4 is out and the market is awash. If not it's cheap enough to keep for those niche shoots without thinking which Leica glass I could have had instead.

 

Didn't the "Online photographer" do a piece a while ago about how for many who post online and never print higher than postcard 4MP was enough ? I could always get a second mortgage and put an 80MP back on the 'blad.

 

Stopping now, the mods have been too kind to let this run, to them thanks and to members who have restrained from complaining as well.

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Ruben

 

It certainly would be possible to provide a manual winder attachment to clip on to the base in place of the base plate. Looking at the underside, all that would be required would be to leave the motor switched off and move the lever in the direction shown. Maybe an M8 equivalent of the Leicavit?

 

The idea of a Leicavit or better Tom's Rapidwinder sounds very interesting.

Just made a video of the lever in action:

Leica M8 shutter cocking lever with motor sound - YouTube

 

I currently try to build a blimp for the M8 for silent recording sessions. But a manual clocking would also solve the problem, as the most disturbing noise comes from the little motor and not the shutter itself.

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I currently try to build a blimp for the M8 for silent recording sessions. But a manual clocking would also solve the problem, as the most disturbing noise comes from the little motor and not the shutter itself.

 

Interesting! Keep us informed of your progress, please. Here is a prototype blimp made for the M3.

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Interesting! Keep us informed of your progress, please. Here is a prototype blimp made for the M3.

 

Very interesting! But the M3 is much more quiet. Saldy the M8 is awful noisy!

 

I ordered a little smaller Peli case than this one:

FxF Blog: My Sound Blimp Tutorial

 

And I ordered two different acoustic foams to buid a sandwich of 1cm composite foam one layer of bitumen and 1cm of special acoustic foam. Within an airtight hardcase this should be enough to make the camera quiet. The one at the link above used weaker foam and made a DSLR nearly silent.

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Very interesting! But the M3 is much more quiet. Saldy the M8 is awful noisy!

 

I didn't know that. Every camera is quiet to me.

 

I ordered a little smaller Peli case than this one:

FxF Blog: My Sound Blimp Tutorial

 

And I ordered two different acoustic foams to buid a sandwich of 1cm composite foam one layer of bitumen and 1cm of special acoustic foam.[...]

 

When I built cars I used certified aircraft sealed-cell foam to soundproof the vehicle - plus some plastic coated thin lead plates cemented to certain body panels to dampen resonance. I don't know anything about bitumen. Guess I'll learn up!

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For sound proofing, there is a foam and vinyl made for marine use with a lead foil core. It is called lead mass loaded foam/vinyl.

 

Wilson

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For sound proofing, there is a foam and vinyl made for marine use with a lead foil core. It is called lead mass loaded foam/vinyl.

 

Wilson

 

Thanks Wilson!

 

I did some research and found out that bitumen absorbs even more sound than lead. But mass loaded is interesting. I tried a sandwich of bitumen and two layers of foam. Works well. (Some special plastic foils should even work more effective than bitumen but I have not found any to buy yet).

 

I will start a new thread those days for the blimp.

 

Best, Gottlieb

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For sound proofing, there is a foam and vinyl made for marine use with a lead foil core. It is called lead mass loaded foam/vinyl.

 

Wilson

 

That is a very important contribution! I will look into it.

 

I pulled some of the interior panels off of my new car because, well I have the time and the tools, and was looking for electricals to tap into, and found some strategically placed coated heavy-metal plates epoxied to various spots on the outer skin. Clever, these Japanese are.

 

Mass loaded is the key. Now I have a lead to follow as I finish my hand-built car - the tragedy that is it anyway.

Oh, since that photo the front wheels have been set-out another half-inch.

 

Signing out now. Long day.

.

Edited by pico

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Thanks for the translation, Gottlieb. I've enough leads now to pursue local sources. The Bitumen film looks promising for certain areas of the car (which I am told is already very quiet).

 

OT - I wonder how much of the Leica M really needs to be enclosed to adequately muffle the shutter and winder. Strategic placement of materials it might produce a surprisingly compact unit.

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Pico,

 

Be careful with bitumen film. I bought an expensive Musical Fidelity CD player, that supposedly had been upgraded by a company, who should have known what they were doing. Not only did it not sound as good as it should but within 6 months had deteriorated to the point where it was unusable. I sent it to the guy who normally does any upgrading HiFi work I need doing. It was a nightmare inside. Not only had the upgrades all been done wrongly but the idiot had used low melting point bitumen film as sound damping on the housing. It had partially melted and draped itself all over the circuitry and looked like a Salvador Dali picture. I have no idea how Colin managed to clean it all off but in addition to the work to do all the upgrades correctly I had a substantial bill for cleaning labour and solvents. The original upgrader had unsurprisingly, given the appalling standard of his work, gone bust by this time.

 

Wilson

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So thats good to see. No matter how handy one is if it goes wrong send it back to Leica. Dont put your fingers in there!

You obviously know what you are doing. When you get it back together let us know, and see if it works.

Thanks for an informative project. Will look forward to seeing a pic when its in one piece again.

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Mark,

 

Just found out about this. Great post! I have an M9, are you going to do an "Anatomy of the M9" in the near future?

I would love to see how can I lift the top plate off to clean some dust and tiny fibers that somehow ended up in my viewfinder.

Or is it the same procedure like this M8? (two screws from the bottom)?

Any ideas?

 

Best regards

 

Milos

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Scary that this old thread is nearly 7 years old. There's not much point doing one on the M9 because the design and structure of the M9 is very similar; updated electronics plus of course the larger sensor. The structure of the M Typ 240 is fundamentally different and you cannot get into it without removing the covering. ASAIK, Camera Leather do not do replacements yet, not even sure if they are still in business.

 

If you want to clean the inside of the viewfinder, you will need to remove the plastic plate in the base, 5 screws and the top cover, two screws, the one nearest the end in the battery compartment and the one at the top of a hole exposed when that plate is removed.

 

Mind the flexprint which connects the top of the camera to the rest of it and, especially, keep your fingers off the insides of the viewfinder windows which are difficult to clean.

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Thank you Mark!

 

I appreciate you taking the time to reply even after your work is done seven years ago!

 

I just wanted to be sure I won't find any spring bombs when I carefully remove the top.

The little fibers I have in my VF are annoying me and I'll be extra careful using helping hand to hold sensitive parts in mid air in order not to break the flat cable or any connectors.

 

I just needed to know what you confirmed: 5 screws to remove the plastic bottom cover and two screws for the top plate - like the M8.

 

Many thanks!

 

Milos

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Mark,

 

Thank you! Not only very instructive but the accompanying images are some of the best macros I have seen in illustration of your article. Congratulations!

 

What impresses and amazes me every time I see the innards of a camera is that a team of designers have worked together to solve problems both in fitting all of the necessary components into a workable body, and in their manufacture and assembly, often with tiny tolerances.

 

Quite honestly I almost dumbfounded as to how they do it, especially in the various digital M models where the Leica technicians and designers have done it using the M body we know and love… and that, for the most part, all of this is taken pretty much for granted.

 

Your wonderful stripdown, and explanations and photos quite rightly show how incredibly difficult all of this work is, and what a superb piece of precision manufacture is now routine.

 

Once again, thank you.

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