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Doc Henry

I like film...(open thread)

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3 hours ago, Wayne said:

Thanks for all the great photos of this magnificent animal. I have been around many of them and have always enjoyed their character.

Funny story: a friend owned one, "Newman," who was exactly like your description of this animal. Until......one day a neighbor's cow broke a fence and intruded into my friends front yard. Friend, being used to just letting the dog go out to for bowel and bladder clearing, but without a leash, was a shocked as the dog to see the cow in the yard. Friend:..."It was if Newman became possessed; I had never seen him move so fast." Newman latched onto the cow's nose and went for a wild ride that went on for several minutes. Friend:..."The cow was waving Newman around in the air violently; Newman was not letting go for any reason." Both the cow and Newman came out of it OK. Once Newman was off the cow, he went right back to being the normal, docile Newman.

Thanks again for the shots.

Best,

Wayne

That's wonderful Wayne! I'd read that the dog now called the English bulldog bears little genetic heritage from the original bull baiting beasts, but evidently Newman had not heard that, and every dog has his day!. I'd love one, but I suspect they would fail at the main task I'd want a dog for, being carting my Linhof, lenses and tripod on long hikes.

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vor 16 Stunden schrieb Ernest:

Gulp, how utterly galactic, Slipher completely off my radar, redshifted and all! I am always learning something new on LUF, so thank you for shining your flashlight into the cosmos, I have only a couple of AA batteries in my little flashlight, so my work with Newton Outtake is hardly esoteric. Again, I'm dealing with work that looks at the construction of photography, what is seen and what is implied. As an outtake, Newton's nonetheless (so presumptuous), this piece is a flawed remnant, a discard. It's haphazard sketch of a work that is unrealized. There is only the jumbled spectrum that isn't a spectrum of white light. Perhaps dialogue with Goethe, as Christoph suggests, would be fruitful. But here it is. Colorful ribbon scraps of color on the margins of gray nothingness, though there is the ancestry of flesh here, gray moving toward Mary Shelley's animation. This can be excused, though, at last, as the scrap of an idea, a fragment that can only suggest a narrative thread to give it an imaginative life. There were seven scraps that led to this scrap. All outtakes. Residue.

Rog, sorry for pushing my phantasy about the color ribbons onto you. The color ribbons just reminded me of spectra of light--not necessarily of white light. And as Slipher did the fundamental work of analyzing the spectra of planets etc  with photographic means, your work clicked that button... sorry.

But in the end--I find it interesting how much  the intention of the artist and the perception of the viewer can differ. Is that a good thing ? Are we allowed to release our works of art into the world--as if they were  kids that have come of age and now must find their way on their own ?  I try  to do so-- but don't succeed all the time...   

vor 7 Stunden schrieb Wayne:

Thanks for all the great photos of this magnificent animal. I have been around many of them and have always enjoyed their character.

Funny story: a friend owned one, "Newman," who was exactly like your description of this animal. Until......one day a neighbor's cow broke a fence and intruded into my friends front yard. Friend, being used to just letting the dog go out to for bowel and bladder clearing, but without a leash, was a shocked as the dog to see the cow in the yard. Friend:..."It was if Newman became possessed; I had never seen him move so fast." Newman latched onto the cow's nose and went for a wild ride that went on for several minutes. Friend:..."The cow was waving Newman around in the air violently; Newman was not letting go for any reason." Both the cow and Newman came out of it OK. Once Newman was off the cow, he went right back to being the normal, docile Newman.

Thanks again for the shots.

Best,

Wayne

Wayne, even the smallest of the dog breeds have a part in their brain were they still are wolves....or so it seems.😲 

vor 6 Stunden schrieb Suede:

A few oaks...  [Tri-X]

Pritam, another  nice photo of inclined trees... is there something wrong with the magnetic field of the earth in your part of the world? 😁

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vor 12 Minuten schrieb bags27:

Mamiya 7 80 mm HP5+ HC110-B

After this covid months i should not sit on the very right or left side of this bench…

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4 hours ago, Kl@usW. said:

Rog, sorry for pushing my phantasy about the color ribbons onto you. The color ribbons just reminded me of spectra of light--not necessarily of white light. And as Slipher did the fundamental work of analyzing the spectra of planets etc  with photographic means, your work clicked that button... sorry.

Please don't misunderstand me; I didn't take umbrage with your interpretation, at all, but rather I am delighted with your reading, the fact that it invited your creative response. For me, the fun of playing in this sandbox of abstraction is that it invites pushing the sand this way and that, so there's not necessarily one "correct" response that is in line with the artist's intention. That's when I think photographs here are really working as an invitation to share in a perspective that may not have even been intended but is the reflection of intuition. We appreciate that what is left out can be as significant as what is included. Now, back to Edward Albee's The Sandbox.  

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More from  my outing with my 1986 M6 loaded with the 'Gift' 12/2013 Agfa Vista 200 which I rated at 200 ASA as it had been well stored, and home-processed in C41.

Sailor's Grave in Brentwood Catholic Cathedral -- 1989 50mm f2 Summicron @ f2.8 

Autumn on Brentwood Catholic Cathedral Graveyard, 1989 50mm f2 Summicron @ f2.8

This is the 'Original Brentwood Fire Station' from the 1800's when the appliance was 'Horse-Pulled' - now a Polish Barber's 1988 35mm f1.4 Summilux @ f4

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