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Doc Henry

I like film...(open thread)

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1 hour ago, Sparkassenkunde said:

Another, more minimalistic approach, Baltic Sea once more:

Minolta Autocord - Tri-X 320 (dev. in Rodinal 1+50)

Some of your recent work James, is inspired, this one in particular is really lovely . 

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9 minutes ago, benqui said:

Cinestill 800, M6, Summilux 50

 

Look at her skin - exquisite! You just don't get skin rendition like this except on film. Just a great portrait, Marc - her hair, the hint of shoulder and her inscrutable expression are perfect.

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51 minutes ago, stray cat said:

Look at her skin - exquisite! You just don't get skin rendition like this except on film. Just a great portrait, Marc - her hair, the hint of shoulder and her inscrutable expression are perfect.

I agree Phil!

Btw, if I hadn't checked it was you, Phil, I could have sworn it was the Doc?

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The fog - a dead giveaway! And here was I, Steve, about to post a poppy pic as well! Or was it the mini film vs digital mention?

I'll accept the compliment of a comparison to Doc Henry any day!

 

Edited by stray cat

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20 hours ago, stray cat said:

"Lunar Sea" or even "Total Lunar Sea" might be a more appropriate title Rog. This and Little Red Oblique just border on the totally unhinged, although the latter looks like it might have hinges in order to open into the 3D box it obviously really is. How do you do that? No - don't want to know - the mystery of the process combined with the mystery of the narrative spoken by the pictures themselves is too delicious to deconstruct. Please, though, do keep pointing that virtual Leica of yours at these virtual scenes in that virtual universe. And where's Billy Bibbit hiding?

Love the "Lunar Sea" titling! "Little Red Oblique" is a spin off from the Rietveld Box I posted a while ago and reworked it with the "looking in the rangefinder,' calling attention to the fact that this is, indeed, a photograph of a photograph concept and that the frame lines omit those elements of the box, which completely changes what the photograph would be in the edited version. Bertolt Brecht did this in theatre, borrowing from Chinese theatre, and called it the Verfremdungseffekt or "alienation effect." On stage, he reminded the audience with dialogue and posters that it was the artifice of the theatre being enacted--the audience was then prevented from being drawn into the theatrical moment by identifying or empathizing with the characters. This was in direct opposition to the Stanislavsky school adopted for method acting by Lee Strasberg and others. Godard used Brechtian alienation effect in his films, such as Vivre Sa Vie, by having his characters (Anna Karenina) break character and interview themselves on camera. The director, in this way, calls attention to the artifice of the film as medium. Recall the opening shots of Bergman's Persona with film chattering through a projector, getting stuck, then burning through to a glaring white theatre screen. "Get it, people, this is a film you're watching!" And these are words that I am typing on my computer screen, and since I am as paranoid as Phil is about everything vaporizing with an errant key stroke, I just saved (copied) everything, just to be "safe." All an illusion.  What's safe in cyberland? So wrapping up, "Little Red Oblique" capitalizes on Brecht and perhaps a bit of Bauhaus minimalism at the same it.

Here's the original red photograph, shot on E100 at LACMA: the red-painted steel girder and wire cable of an elevator. Lightroom knocked out the perspective bit, or is that Bibbit?

Red Red  M-A APO 50 E100

Edited by Ernest

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Red Transform Example  M-A APO 50 E100
To get the bottom "transform" image in Lightroom, go to Develop, select Transform, Vertical +100
I was inspired by Rauschenberg's Cardbird series using flattened cardboard boxes, for the most part, arranged into different configurations. I wanted to use color field studies to create color photo-boxes.

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