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I like film...(open thread)

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27 minutes ago, A miller said:

Ha ha, I would echo Philip's suggestion to try some of the Hahnemühle papers, particularly those with texture.  Whitewall has a full selection of them and is a very cost efficient lab despite being in Germany.  It usually only take a couple of days to get an order delivered and shipped is (usually much less) than $10.

Having said all of this, my first instinct would be to work with a pro lab out by you that prints metal using Chromalux, which is a proprietary brand of metal that is the top of the line, via dye sublimation.  The surface has an industrial feel and I am thinking that you could have sectionals made in a combo of matte, same gloss and high gloss to reflect the different textures within the various sections of your images.  It somewhat outside of the box but I think that it could be done and would really compliment your series nicely.  

Thanks, Adam (or is it simply FM to the cognoscenti?), for the "next level" tips, particularly metal printing and even sculptural constructions, very Bauhaus. And, your suggestion to marry "a combo of matte (with) the same gloss and high gloss to reflect the different textures within the various sections of your images" is truly inspired. Gerhard Richter has even used large panes of clear glass to reflect and refract his paintings, as a sort of sculptural stand-alone. Interestingly, viewers see themselves reflected in the glass, while looking at the very large paintings. Thanks, again, for your inspirational concepts.

Cheers,
Rog

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4 minutes ago, Ernest said:

Lingua Franca II
M-A APO 50 E100
Five stucco walls, eighty images--manifestation of extreme vertigo. One hundred years of Bauhaus!

This is exceptional, Rog. You've had the scissors and glue working overtime here! Am I also seeing a slight tip of the hat to Ralph Gibson's "Black" series here - perhaps you have both been playing around with the Bauhaus ethic and have come upon it independently?

BTW regarding printing. You mentioned that you thought that printing on a textured surface, given the texture in the pictures themselves, might to your mind be redundant. I would think that the texture of a really good matt paper, such as Canson Aquarelle Rag, would really enhance that texture. You might also find a paper like Canson's BFK Rives, which is matt but with a smooth surface, works particularly well. In any case, I think that printing either quite small and intimate - say to an A4 sheet, or really large - A2 - might look spectacular, depending on where you'd want to view it.

Edited by stray cat

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2 hours ago, stray cat said:

This is exceptional, Rog. You've had the scissors and glue working overtime here! Am I also seeing a slight tip of the hat to Ralph Gibson's "Black" series here - perhaps you have both been playing around with the Bauhaus ethic and have come upon it independently?

BTW regarding printing. You mentioned that you thought that printing on a textured surface, given the texture in the pictures themselves, might to your mind be redundant. I would think that the texture of a really good matt paper, such as Canson Aquarelle Rag, would really enhance that texture. You might also find a paper like Canson's BFK Rives, which is matt but with a smooth surface, works particularly well. In any case, I think that printing either quite small and intimate - say to an A4 sheet, or really large - A2 - might look spectacular, depending on where you'd want to view it.

Thanks, Phil, for your expertise and suggestions for printing and presentation. So much of this is not really in my wheelhouse, so it is all very exciting.  You sent me back to Ralph Gibson‘s Black Trilogy to see what you were talking about in terms of Bauhaus influence.  There is one photograph in Déjà Vu that may be what you are talking about: the detail of a zigzag cornIce. I remember his Quadrants series, published in part in Camera magazine in the 70s, shot with a dual-range Summicron 50mm (M3, I think);  some of the shots were architectural details, walls, and the others were close details, like the priest and the ducktail hairdo shot. Everything was shot close (24 inches), so that when he printed a 16x20, it was practically life-size on the wall. 

 Bridget Riley, as you have brought up in the past, comes more to mind with this latest study, “Lingua Franca.”  Also, Frank Stella, his early work in the 60s, Jasper Johns, and Gerhard Richter’s Patterns. Rauschenberg always manages to wiggle his way in there, in any case.

And talk about wiggling, you managed to wiggle yourself an awesome homage to 18th century ruinism. Lummi Island.  The colors, textures, the history! The epitome of fragmentation at its zenith, from the ruins we are left to imagine the narrative.  I want to turn on the car radio if it had one. This must have been a rather sporty coupe.  Transparent Things

Cheers, Rog 🎬

Edited by Ernest

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2 hours ago, Ernest said:

Thanks, Phil, for your expertise and suggestions for printing and presentation. So much of this is not really in my wheelhouse, so it is all very exciting.  You sent me back to Ralph Gibson‘s Black Trilogy to see what you were talking about in terms of Bauhaus influence.  There is one photograph in Déjà Vu that may be what you are talking about: the detail of a zigzag cornIce. I remember his Quadrants series, published in part in Camera magazine in the 70s, shot with a dual-range Summicron 50mm (M3, I think);  some of the shots were architectural details, walls, and the others were close details, like the priest and the ducktail hairdo shot. Everything was shot close (24 inches), so that when he printed a 16x20, it was practically life-size on the wall. 

 Bridget Riley, as you have brought up in the past, comes more to mind with this latest study, “Lingua Franca.”  Also, Frank Stella, his early work in the 60s, Jasper Johns, and Gerhard Richter’s Patterns. Rauschenberg always manages to wiggle his way in there, in any case.

And talk about wiggling, you managed to wiggle yourself an awesome homage to 18th century ruinism. Lummi Island.  The colors, textures, the history! The epitome of fragmentation at its zenith, from the ruins we are left to imagine the narrative.  I want to turn on the car radio if it had one. This must have been a rather sporty coupe.  Transparent Things

Cheers, Rog 🎬

Thank you Rog so much. Yes, I think I was thinking of Quadrants - it was that that I viewed in London in 1980, not the Black Series, and there were some architectural shots in that series that your Lingua Franca brought to mind. It has always stayed with me, that exhibition (well, not the name, obviously 🤪) and the images, or the memory of them, still reverberate through the cranial passages from time to time. And it is VERY Bridget Riley, now that you mention it. But it is the textural quality in your work that swayed me to think towards Gibson's series.

Lingua Franca - isn't that what photography is after all?

Yes, Lummi Island is an interesting place. Go there to see bald eagles at work and the most spectacular sunsets. And Canada - that's it over there in the distance. There may have been a radio, or maybe the music was in my head. The numberplate said '63 - so early Beatles and Beach Boys on the soundtrack, and I was tempted to "acquire" that numberplate for the collection but I figured that it had happily sat there for all those years and it would be a pity not to leave it there. Not a sporty coupe, but a pretty cool motor anyway:

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Good one Phil. Such a gentleman to pay more attention to his phone than the lady.

28 minutes ago, stray cat said:

Not at all sure this works, but I like the colours and the body language:

Honolulu 2019

M6TTL, 35mm, Portra 400

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On 9/19/2019 at 11:33 AM, benqui said:

The difference between the "religious" beach and the (how should I say) "open-minded" beach is worth a book. Both love the sea but both look totally different. After a time of reflection (approx. 2347 milliseconds) I would prefer the second one 😉

I have been in TLV many times, may be the only good thing about the religious beach is: You won't meet anyone from Berlin there 😄 - but no lovely seductive

skinny frenchwomen in hyperexpensive swimsuits either.

Greetings

Edited by Shlomo

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11 hours ago, stray cat said:

Not at all sure this works, but I like the colours and the body language:

Honolulu 2019

M6TTL, 35mm, Portra 400

Yes this works ;) Also the stray lag entering stage left; I love stuff partly revealed at the frame edge.

Shot from the hip?

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