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I like film...(open thread)


Doc Henry

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Cyril Jayant

This photo is from a series from some of my crazy, extreme photo adventures I  had photographing Mountains "Alpinists " and rock climbers. This is Alpes mountain range which is called   "Le Massive du Mont Blanc", Haût Savoir region  In France.  And this place is a White valley ( La Vallee Blanche - Chamonix ) the most beautiful region You must visit. I was very brave enough to carry my Medium format two lenses/ meters/ and a Canon EOS and a 50mm, a lot of films No tripod/ It is crazy when I thi

Michael Hiles

Bonjour Henri,   I still prefer black and white film (I use almost no colour). The advantages of digital don’t mean much to me. Seeing instant results is not so useful, since what comes out of a camera is always far from a final result, and the final result requires time and thought.   Film also continues to improve. The quality of available film and developers is as good as it has ever been, and it is still as competent as digital sensors of equivalent size.   I also much prefer silver g

helged

On a week-long stay at the Faroe Islands, I took the ferry from Torshavn (the 'capital') to the southernmost island, Suduroy, and looked up potential shooting locations on the island. This image was taken a little before the sun was setting in the ocean, with wind from the west (left). With the uplift of the humid air at the cliffs, fog and clouds drifted over the island. A quite typical situation for the islands; the ocean can be more or less cloud free, but the islands are generally covered in

Posted Images

Wonderful photo Klaus. The Story of San Michele is a terrific book (which you've no doubt read)

10 hours ago, Kl@usW. said:

More ( to ) sea... 

Golf of Naples with Vesuvio , seen from Capri, balcony of  Villa Axel Munte, in the evening. Waiting for the concert in the small chapel..

 

m7;  1,4/35; Portra 160@100

Thank you very much for describing your project, Andy. I really like the idea of showing the diverse nature of a diverse state through pictures. I have occasionally checked in on Colorado Seen and think you're doing a great job. It's an interesting publication well worth reading (hint hint everybody) and, importantly, viewing because of the excellent photography, as shown also really well in the images below (Milepost 340 is as funny as it is beautiful and, possibly, sad knowing the extent to which free grazing buffaloes have disappeared due to the extreme cultivation of land).

Thanks also for all those interesting references. When I saw the Lee Gallery page of W Eugene Smith's photos I melted. Whatever one may think of his personality, he had in my opinion one of the best eyes ever for composition. I can never watch "The walk to paradise garden" without getting all soft in the feels, particularly also knowing that he hadn't photographed for a long time (due to the war) before he shot it. So wonderful. And the same acute sense of placement and compelling framing is visible in the images on that page. Anyway, you now have me hunting for Fay's and Plowden's books (and soon a new bookcase too :) )

br

Philip

2 hours ago, adan said:

You mean outside of just looking for an excuse to take pictures? ;)

It is a synthesis of several inspirations: the MegaTransect through central Africa by J. Michael Fay and photographer Mike Nichols for National Geographic in the 1990s (following a meridian of longitude); the Great Plains (and other) photos of David Plowden (also a Hassy user) that I encountered 45 years ago, and since; and a host of other essays on "locale" or "populations" by everyone from Gene Smith (Pittsburgh) to Irving Penn (Worlds in a Small Room).

And even an idea I had of my own once for "photographic golf" - arrange a "course" of, say, 300 paces north - stop and take the best picture I can see from that exact point; walk another 200 yards east and 2 blocks south ("dogleg") and take the best photo visible; walk 50 yards east and look for another photo ("Par 3") and so on, in predefined directions to random spots until I've done 18.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MegaTransect

https://www.davidplowden.com/copy-of-photographs-1

https://www.leegallery.com/w-eugene-smith/exhibition/

https://doorofperception.com/2018/04/irving-penn-worlds-in-a-small-room/

I'm an essayist by nature - I like groups of pictures that either tell a story or add up to more than the sum of the parts. And I have a magazine (see my signature) about Colorado that needs constant feeding. It just struck me that a visual "sampling" of the state and its variety, from its western edge (near-desert) through the mountains and out onto the Great Plains, would be a good essay that unifies this large and diverse State - "connects the dots." And a challenge in seeing.

Basically I go find a specific milepost ending in "0" (220, 310, 440, etc.) along I-70, get off the motorway at the nearest exit, backtrack if needed on smaller roads to get back to abeam the actual milepost, and then cast about within a radius of 800m/0.5 miles from there looking for pictures that define that place, one way or another. While not repeating myself, and avoiding "highway pictures" at all costs, unless the Interstate is absolutely the defining characteristic of that spot. And while trying to make pictures that also stand on their own (lighting, composition, occasional humor) while also being "different" and surprising. I try to find a couple of options so that I can mix and match in editing without duplication (the mountains have a LOT of trees and streams, and the Plains have a LOT of silos and windmills! ;) ). Sometimes I revisit a place, if I find something nice but the light isn't right. I may go back and try Drowning Bison with a tripod and a longer exposure (and more DoF) - just to, you know, see what happens. (Unless that rock falls down.)

I plan to publish the whole thing as one issue of the magazine, exhibit it in my gallery space, and offer 46-print portfolios.

It's about 1/3rd done (16 images so far) - below is a sampling. Top left was the first image I made, that also inspired the idea of a project. The rest show several in sequence (with gaps) across the Great Plains east of Denver. Hassy with: SWC 38 Biogon, 150 Sonnar, 350 Tele-Tessar (in this group), mostly TMax 400/HC-110.

 

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vor 17 Stunden schrieb MT0227:

It's been a while...Work, Life and Photography has not been in balance the last several months.  I also had to convert my entire catalog to a new workstation, which got me way behind on  developing and processing.  I've got most of everything back in order,  just a bit more to do on that work, life, photography balance thing. 

Linhof Master Technika Classic
Schneider Super-Angulon 5.6/47 XL
Tri-X 320 4x5
Developed in HC-110 (B) @20C Jobo 3010 Expert Drum
Epson 850V

 

Suburban Decay - Milltown, NJ

 

Suburban Decay by Marc Tauber, on Flickr

I really like this shot! Perfect b/w with strong contrasts! Hope to see more...

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12 hours ago, Sparkassenkunde said:

Golden sun:

Same combo

My pick!  All three have stunning colours and compositions.  Makes me want to dash to freezer to see if I still have a roll of Velvia in there somewhere!  :)

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6 hours ago, MT0227 said:

 

I really like the tones here Keith, I've been looking to give this film stock a try for some time....I need to get some, 400 too.

Have only used the 120 rolls. The only slight drawback is that the film-base is very thin (physically) compared with Acros etc.  It does however dry nicely flat.  I did try the 400 but as Tri-X and HP5Plus are still readily available, so far there has been no particular need to make the switch.  Also tried the ISO 200 version and found that exposed at box speed it is grainy.  Read somewhere (on a Flickr group and perhaps here, a comment by Adan?) that really it needs to be exposed at EI 125.

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12 hours ago, philipus said:

A slightly friendlier stare this time...


Flickr
40 CFE Ektar X1

Your waist-level 'grab' shots are working well, Philip

3 hours ago, adan said:

You mean outside of just looking for an excuse to take pictures? ;)

It is a synthesis of several inspirations: the MegaTransect through central Africa by J. Michael Fay and photographer Mike Nichols for National Geographic in the 1990s (following a meridian of longitude); the Great Plains (and other) photos of David Plowden (also a Hassy user) that I encountered 45 years ago, and since; and a host of other essays on "locale" or "populations" by everyone from Gene Smith (Pittsburgh) to Irving Penn (Worlds in a Small Room).

Basically I go find a specific milepost ending in "0" (220, 310, 440, etc.) along I-70, get off the motorway at the nearest exit, backtrack if needed on smaller roads to get back to abeam the actual milepost, and then cast about within a radius of 800m/0.5 miles from there looking for pictures that define that place, one way or another. While not repeating myself, and avoiding "highway pictures" at all costs, unless the Interstate is absolutely the defining characteristic of that spot. And while trying to make pictures that also stand on their own (lighting, composition, occasional humor) while also being "different" and surprising. I try to find a couple of options so that I can mix and match in editing without duplication (the mountains have a LOT of trees and streams, and the Plains have a LOT of silos and windmills! ;) ). Sometimes I revisit a place, if I find something nice but the light isn't right. I may go back and try Drowning Bison with a tripod and a longer exposure (and more DoF) - just to, you know, see what happens. (Unless that rock falls down.)

 

Absolutely fascinating idea/project, Andy.  Look forward to seeing your progress and of course, the final result in 'Colorado Seen'.

28 minutes ago, philipus said:

Thanks also for all those interesting references. When I saw the Lee Gallery page of W Eugene Smith's photos I melted. Whatever one may think of his personality, he had in my opinion one of the best eyes ever for composition. I can never watch "The walk to paradise garden" without getting all soft in the feels, particularly also knowing that he hadn't photographed for a long time (due to the war) before he shot it. So wonderful. And the same acute sense of placement and compelling framing is visible in the images on that page. Anyway, you now have me hunting for Fay's and Plowden's books (and soon a new bookcase too :) )

br

Philip

 

Some years ago I bought 'Dream Street - W Eugene Smith's Pittsburgh Project' - highly recommended.

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8 hours ago, adan said:

You mean outside of just looking for an excuse to take pictures? ;)

It is a synthesis of several inspirations: the MegaTransect through central Africa by J. Michael Fay and photographer Mike Nichols for National Geographic in the 1990s (following a meridian of longitude); the Great Plains (and other) photos of David Plowden (also a Hassy user) that I encountered 45 years ago, and since; and a host of other essays on "locale" or "populations" by everyone from Gene Smith (Pittsburgh) to Irving Penn (Worlds in a Small Room).

And even an idea I had of my own once for "photographic golf" - arrange a "course" of, say, 300 paces north - stop and take the best picture I can see from that exact point; walk another 200 yards east and 2 blocks south ("dogleg") and take the best photo visible; walk 50 yards east and look for another photo ("Par 3") and so on, in predefined directions to random spots until I've done 18.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MegaTransect

https://www.davidplowden.com/copy-of-photographs-1

https://www.leegallery.com/w-eugene-smith/exhibition/

https://doorofperception.com/2018/04/irving-penn-worlds-in-a-small-room/

I'm an essayist by nature - I like groups of pictures that either tell a story or add up to more than the sum of the parts. And I have a magazine (see my signature) about Colorado that needs constant feeding. It just struck me that a visual "sampling" of the state and its variety, from its western edge (near-desert) through the mountains and out onto the Great Plains, would be a good essay that unifies this large and diverse State - "connects the dots." And a challenge in seeing.

Basically I go find a specific milepost ending in "0" (220, 310, 440, etc.) along I-70, get off the motorway at the nearest exit, backtrack if needed on smaller roads to get back to abeam the actual milepost, and then cast about within a radius of 800m/0.5 miles from there looking for pictures that define that place, one way or another. While not repeating myself, and avoiding "highway pictures" at all costs, unless the Interstate is absolutely the defining characteristic of that spot. And while trying to make pictures that also stand on their own (lighting, composition, occasional humor) while also being "different" and surprising. I try to find a couple of options so that I can mix and match in editing without duplication (the mountains have a LOT of trees and streams, and the Plains have a LOT of silos and windmills! ;) ). Sometimes I revisit a place, if I find something nice but the light isn't right. I may go back and try Drowning Bison with a tripod and a longer exposure (and more DoF) - just to, you know, see what happens. (Unless that rock falls down.)

I plan to publish the whole thing as one issue of the magazine, exhibit it in my gallery space, and offer 46-print portfolios.

It's about 1/3rd done (16 images so far) - below is a sampling. Top left was the first image I made, that also inspired the idea of a project. The rest show several in sequence (with gaps) across the Great Plains east of Denver. Hassy with: SWC 38 Biogon, 150 Sonnar, 350 Tele-Tessar (in this group), mostly TMax 400/HC-110.

Interesting and inspiring project Adan, thanks for the links worthwhile to be seen and...studied ! Grazie!

robert

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