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Doc Henry

I like film...(open thread)

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1 hour ago, Wayne said:

Terminal moraine, Illinois

Agfa Record, 6x9, Portra 160

Great shot! I like solitary trees!

4 hours ago, Sparkassenkunde said:

My wife capturing a new background picture for her mobile phone:

Same setup as above

 

4 hours ago, Sparkassenkunde said:

I slowly run out of winter pictures, but as there are no new rolls in the queue, you have to stand some more contributions from me :)

Ricoh GR1 - Cinestill 50D (with the obvious schmootz)

I really envy your snow series! Also this Kodak/Cinestill 50D looks fantastic, the colors are beautiful!

4 hours ago, A miller said:

After hearing the recent news of the elimination of the formal ISIS caliphate, which had brutal control over 8 million for souls for many years, I reflected back on this anti-ISIS prayer rally that I came across on Park Avenue on Sunday afternoon a few years ago.  

Although a lot of fire power was involved to get the immediate job done, I am sure that the soulful prayer of our Muslim friends played a key role.

IIIg, 28mm summaron, Portra 400 (pushed two stops)

 

 

 

 

Well-fitting, in every sense!

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On ‎3‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 9:43 PM, stray cat said:

Thinking further on Rog's "assemblages" such as Raspberry Night No. 8, there is so much that sneaks up into your consciousness the more you view various iterations. One such thing is the role played by texture. In one sense, it's a photograph ("no it's not" said little Nicola "it's a tableau or an artwork or an image or...") so the texture is illusory - only a two-dimensional representation of texture. Yet, because I think of the context in which we view it, its texture seems hyper-real - which, in a sense, it is, because the picture/tableau/whatever is an assembled work of motifs taken directly from the "real" world - walls and footpaths and what-have-you. The "texture" is, in effect, the only real thing about the "photograph" because the rest is the result of the artist assembling disparate elements into a coherent, and aesthetically pleasing, whole. Other elements - the composition, shading, the perception of depth and so on - the choices made by the artist - lead us to view this as a meritorious work that stands very much on its own - a monochromatic color field, a statement of classic art theory; this picture serves many intents, as does the rest of Rog's anthology of assemblages, ~tyches. I can only imagine that a well-compiled and curated exhibition, or a book, of these works would be remarkable. Perhaps, with a bit of encouraging nudging in Rog's direction, some day  we might see something like that.

"We are all aware (at least I hope we are) that the range of talented photographers here on the "I like film" thread embraces every single one of us who contributes - of that there is no question." Phil, you certainly have the rare skill of broadcasting with diamond hard precision what many of us sometimes assume as a given or grapple with in terms of the textual language that expresses the visual valence of photography. It's this valence, the emotional force or significance, of a photograph that can play on subtext and metaphor that rays out from the visual to the emotional. The apparent can become transparent, implying layers of interpretation and meaning. Layer on layer, a palimpsest. Which interpretation is prompted or posited? An interesting concept in literature that can be applied to photography is the allegory, a story or poem that has a parallel unstated story. In visual art, it's a picture or emblem, Alciatti's Book of Emblems, for example, with a symbolic meaning. Allegory is similar to the parable, and it's interesting to note that the 16th-century Geneva Bible with its marginal gloss that explained the meaning of parables continued in popularity some forty years after the 1611 King James Bible. Consider also Albrecht Durer's Apocalypse (1498), the first book of illustrations by an artist. Durer's fifteen woodcuts pictured verses from the Book of Revelation, interestingly, literal visualizations.

Your point about my assemblages, or color field constructs, and texture is so dead solid on target! Now, I have an image of Jasper Johns's Target paintings shuffling out of the archive. "The 'texture' is, in effect, the only real thing about the "photograph" because the rest is the result of the artist assembling disparate elements into a coherent, and aesthetically pleasing, whole." The marching orders for me is the expression of an image-construct that evolves through ideas instead of action. Here, the color field study undermines the status of the photograph as evidence of a moment, the documentary of an instant. While the construct is static, though, it can initiate a dialogue of action. This would be in allegorical terms, laying bare the parallel unstated "story." This assumes that the "work" is "working," which is not always box that gets checked off. So much editing, I look through my work and realize full well there are many times I should be pleading temporary insanity. Still, insanity can be fun, I whisper to myself.

I am so impressed by your dowser-like prospecting of my work in your comments, I hope if ever a slim volume of the few color field assemblages that merit a check marked box surfaces, I could talk you out of first galaxy publication rights for the paragraph.

Cheers,
Rog

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On ‎3‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 11:09 AM, Sparkassenkunde said:

The way you created three dimensionality here is mesmerizing. Certainly one of my favorites from your studies. The more I see from your work, the more it grows to my heart. Keep them coming! 

Thanks, James, I keep working on it. I appreciate your comments and your inspired shots.

 

Cheers,
Rog

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8 minutes ago, Ernest said:

Summation Notation
M-A Macro-Elmar-M
ADOX Color Implosion

Just seeing if this adds up. I keep getting a different answer.

Strong composition! Reminiscent of Jasper Johns' painting Numbers in Color.

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28 minutes ago, atournas said:

Strong composition! Reminiscent of Jasper Johns' painting Numbers in Color.

Yes, and his Gray Alphabets, too. I used vintage handcarved wood letterpress type. Turn of the century, I think.

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vor 7 Stunden schrieb Sparkassenkunde:

Another stunning portrait from you - thanks for sharing these wonderful pictures here.

Thanks a lot James for your kind words. We all know that the thread "I like film" is really by far the best part of the forum. Different topics, different films and very helpful discussions about the photos and (this is the best) without deadly serious discussions!

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