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Doc Henry

I like film...(open thread)

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Posted (edited)

Thank you so much everyone for chiming in, I really appreciate it. You are all making this search both easier and more difficult which is delightful :p  I am looking at film photos, in particular in this thread of course, to get a feel for the lenses I am considering. In terms of focal length, if I am only to get one lens (;)) I am leaning more towards 28 than 35, just to get away further from 50mm which is my most-used focal length. In the past I have found that pairing my 2,8cm Hektor with a 50mm provides very good coverage. Thanks again for all your helpful thoughts. 

On 3/8/2019 at 4:43 PM, A miller said:

Philip - I have used many 28s.  The older cron is tempting as prices have come way down.  I bought one but then sold it b/c I though it rendered too contrasty.  I really love my pre-aspherical elmarit.  There are 4 versions and I have the 4th (the last before the aspherical version) and really love how it renders on film.  It also won't break your bank. 

 

On 3/8/2019 at 5:19 PM, Steve Ricoh said:

Philip, I have the 35/2.0 asph and it's perfect in every regard on digital, and on film; hard to fault it if perfection is the criteria. However I wouldn't say it's a lens of character, the elusive something that's hard to describe. If choosing again I think I would choose character over perfection. Probably best to research by looking at images of several candidate lenses.

 

21 hours ago, atournas said:

Hi, Philip.

I have been using the 35mm f/2 ASPH for the last twenty plus years. No complaint at all: small, light, unobtrusive. There is a new model I think, but I see no reason why I should replace it. I'm also considering the 28mm f/2.8 ASPH for myself. I have decided to go for the previous model; it is said the new one is optimised for the digital M's, so the older one will be more flexible. Hope I was of help.

Paul

 

17 hours ago, stray cat said:

I guess you'll get as many answers as there are photographers to this one Philip. I can only add to that kerfuffle by recommending the lenses that I have in that focal length, which I absolutely would replace like for like if (horror of horrors) something was to happen to them: the 28mm Elmarit version IV (same as Adam recommended) and the 35mm Summicron version IV (the one immediately pre-aspherical). Sometimes I just look at the way these lenses translate light onto film and just smile away. It's all personal of course. I also have two Summaron 35mm f3.5s and these are outstanding, tiny lenses too, but the f2 Summicron is just that bit better in marginal light. Good luck with your search - whatever you choose you'll make beautiful pictures with.

Very nice Keith, and another 35mm lens for me to consider.

4 hours ago, Keith (M) said:

Two photos inside the NT's Avebury Manor.  MP, 35mm Summaron f2.8, Portra 400.

1) Snooker & Selfie!

 

2) Kitchen

Really sterling stuff Christoph. 

28 minutes ago, christoph_d said:

Phil, 

Here on this forum there are many people who post excellent pictures - I feel like a kid in front of a toyshop window every time I log in. There are fewer people, and you are one of them, who consistently post encouragement and critique and that is very welcoming. Thank you!

Rgds

Christoph

MP, 75, Adox100

 

Edited by philipus

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Posted (edited)

Thank you for this photo. I found it a very humbling experience to visit Tuol Sleng. It also surprised me how centrally located it was, right in the midst of housing blocks as I recall. I guess the benefit of a dictatorship is that one doesn't need to worry about public opinion but can commit atrocities in the open. I have a photo from the Killing Fields which is pretty disturbing. I'll see if I can find it.

9 hours ago, djmay said:

I met Chum Mey about ten years ago at the Tuol Sleng prison (S-21) in Phnom Penh, where he was one of only twelve people who survived torture and imprisonment there. All the other estimated 20,000 prisoners, who had not been killed by the torture, were taken to what were later known as the Killing Fields. I spoke with Chum, through an interpreter, as he told me his story. In 2009 Chum testified at the trial of the head of the prison.

In the photo Chum is standing outside the cell, in which he was imprisoned.

 

Edited by philipus

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Checking my archival black hole I found two to show what I meant earlier. It is very common to see human bone fragments and teeth when visiting the various "killing fields" sites. One is literally walking and standing in human remains. These two photos are from the Choeung Ek site. The stupa in the background houses around 5000 skulls (EOS 1N 17-40L unknown transparency film Coolscan V).

/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7882/46414030775_4036d417d2_b.jpg&key=e97318522952a9412a3ef4939b42d3408f93ca175889e7e03b70e591ce701b4b">
Flickr

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Two more from Avebury Manor.  Both with MP, 35mm Summaron f2.8, Portra 400. Both hand-held. Given the reliance on what light there was from the windows, I am impressed by the way the Portra handled the conditions.

/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7809/47276734652_05e2aa05d3_o.jpg&key=f6875b614a947014fa0853c591df48ec71e5aede6b2af478f95ac857562714ab">

/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7878/33453578598_935754898d_o.jpg&key=41380241845c87857c200655f52c4d589f8c0ca5cd23fff4ed9c5bdf5b374866">

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3 hours ago, philipus said:

Checking my archival black hole I found two to show what I meant earlier. It is very common to see human bone fragments and teeth when visiting the various "killing fields" sites. One is literally walking and standing in human remains. These two photos are from the Choeung Ek site. The stupa in the background houses around 5000 skulls (EOS 1N 17-40L unknown transparency film Coolscan V).


Flickr


Flickr

Truly haunting, in plain sight.

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On ‎3‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 4:01 PM, A miller said:

Wow, back-lit brilliance, Rog.  That is some killer red.

 

On ‎3‎/‎8‎/‎2019 at 2:27 AM, philipus said:

Wow man, stop! You're giving me vertigo. The shadow play here is truly terrific and extremely effective, Rog, and I keep wondering what lies beneath the murky darkness down below. A clown perhaps?

Thanks for the encouragement, Adam and Philip. And, yes, you've got my "clowning around" perfectly pegged, Philip. Bring on the circus.

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On ‎3‎/‎6‎/‎2019 at 7:21 PM, MT0227 said:

One of my favorites to date Ernest...the colors, the patterns, the transitions...

Thanks, Marc, it's one that gives me justification for another Starbucks! Second thought, maybe I'm redlining already. Ha, ha. LUF is such a kick.

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On ‎3‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 9:50 PM, stray cat said:

Rog, I feel you have entered ever new territory with these latest three assemblages. I am particularly taken with "Gray Mean" and its trompe-l'œil virtuosity. Brilliant work.

Thanks so much, Phil. The hazard of "new territory" is like looking at all the signatures scratched into the glass windows of Shakespeare's birthplace and realizing the countless visitors have been here already. Yes, "Gray Mean" is a slight homage to Barnack's "golden mean" 2:3 aspect ratio as I was thinking of 17th century Dutch perspective boxes.

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On ‎3‎/‎8‎/‎2019 at 7:43 AM, A miller said:

Coming back to this one, Rog.  Some freshly tarred crosswalk awesomeness, me thinks... 👏

Absolutely, tarred, feathered, and . . . wait, I was thinking about the townspeople's response to one of my photographs. Yes, the blackest street pavement after a fresh rain I've seen. Click, gotcha for the black palette bin.

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On 3/8/2019 at 3:30 PM, joergel said:

Congrats, Adam!

Regards Joerg

 

On 3/8/2019 at 3:39 PM, christoph_d said:

Adam, 

Well done, and an excellent picture it is.

Many thanks, Joerg and Christoph.  Marco at Eyeshot initially asked for my OctMan photo but I really don't favor that one and so I steered toward this one :)

13 hours ago, Keith (M) said:

Two photos inside the NT's Avebury Manor.  MP, 35mm Summaron f2.8, Portra 400.

1) Snooker & Selfie!

 

 

2) Kitchen

 

Keith - Love these indoor photos, especially the top one with your image in the mirror.  I love the details of the room, such as the picture with the horse, and, of course, the film aesthetic.  

9 hours ago, Sparkassenkunde said:

My answer to all the stunning work in this thread: WOW!

Ricoh GR1 - Portra 160

 

Love it, James  That is one really long selfie stick!

8 hours ago, christoph_d said:

Phil, 

Here on this forum there are many people who post excellent pictures - I feel like a kid in front of a toyshop window every time I log in. There are fewer people, and you are one of them, who consistently post encouragement and critique and that is very welcoming. Thank you!

Rgds

Christoph

 

MP, 75, Adox100

 This one is great, Christoph.  Congrats.

8 hours ago, Kleinkamera said:

 

Denver, Colorado

Fuji Provia 100

Wow, love the colors, James.  That deep blue is sublime

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Posted (edited)

Adam, the great Polish film director Krzysztof Kieślowski made, as his last series of films, what came to be known as the Three Colors Trilogy. The three colors, and the names of the three films in order, were Blue, White and Red in honour of the tricolore, the French flag. Each film was art directed so that the colour of the title was dominant. Your picture above reminds me so much of the style he used - in this case it would have been in "Three Colors: White". The films are incredibly moving and just beautiful to look at - as is your photograph. If you haven't seen the films (and apologies if I'm preaching to the converted) I highly recommend them.

Edited by stray cat

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1 hour ago, stray cat said:

Adam, the great Polish film director Krzysztof Kieślowski made, as his last series of films, what came to be known as the Three Colors Trilogy. The three colors, and the names of the three films in order, were Blue, White and Red in honour of the tricolore, the French flag. Each film was art directed so that the colour of the title was dominant. Your picture above reminds me so much of the style he used - in this case it would have been in "Three Colors: White". The films are incredibly moving and just beautiful to look at - as is your photograph. If you haven't seen the films (and apologies if I'm preaching to the converted) I highly recommend them.

wow, that's pretty cool, Phil.  I have looked this up and will add these films to my list to watch with my wife in the coming weeks.  Thanks for the very kind remarks and for the very interesting insights!

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