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I like film...(open thread)


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NYC dog for Gary...

Horribly underexposed yet salvaged to an extent

M-A, 28mm elmarit pre asph

Portra 400

That must be a New Yorkie [emoji3]

 

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Edited by gsgary
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This photo is from a series from some of my crazy, extreme photo adventures I  had photographing Mountains "Alpinists " and rock climbers. This is Alpes mountain range which is called   "Le Massive du Mont Blanc", Haût Savoir region  In France.  And this place is a White valley ( La Vallee Blanche - Chamonix ) the most beautiful region You must visit. I was very brave enough to carry my Medium format two lenses/ meters/ and a Canon EOS and a 50mm, a lot of films No tripod/ It is crazy when I thi

Bonjour Henri,   I still prefer black and white film (I use almost no colour). The advantages of digital don’t mean much to me. Seeing instant results is not so useful, since what comes out of a camera is always far from a final result, and the final result requires time and thought.   Film also continues to improve. The quality of available film and developers is as good as it has ever been, and it is still as competent as digital sensors of equivalent size.   I also much prefer silver g

On a week-long stay at the Faroe Islands, I took the ferry from Torshavn (the 'capital') to the southernmost island, Suduroy, and looked up potential shooting locations on the island. This image was taken a little before the sun was setting in the ocean, with wind from the west (left). With the uplift of the humid air at the cliffs, fog and clouds drifted over the island. A quite typical situation for the islands; the ocean can be more or less cloud free, but the islands are generally covered in

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I am typically not one to rush images on this thread without a careful HQ scan and edit in the comfort of my own home.

 

But i thought i'd break the rule just once to share some photos from the Dead Sea from this past weekend.

 

I shot them with my M7, 50 lux asph and CINESTILL 50 (no schmootz and rolls that the Wright Brothers sent me personally after the last debacle)

 

The scans are very basic untouched low res lab scans (which i never buy but thought my wife would have fun sharing them with family via Whatsapp) from Panda Labs in Tel Aviv, which is great in every way (e.g., they lent me a giant light table for a few days to study my slides at home).

 

Further, like an overexhausted idiot i opened the camera up before rewinding this particular roll of film, and I did this outside on 45C heat.

 

I will likely be able to improve on the results materials once i get home. But there is something about them that is just right the way they are.

 

Another note, due to the dark mud i opened up anothet half to full stop beyond my normal ETTR approach. The film handled this VERY well and i think it is worth reiterating that this film can handle a fair defree of overexposure very well but (based on past experiences) does NOT like to be underexposed.

 

Subjects are my family. We had a great time. Shot 13 rolls of velvia and provia with my sec, which i will share in the coming months.

 

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Nice, I can see a bit of Elliott Erwitt in these

 

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Hello Everyone,

Just black from a vacation in Greece, and here are some of the first photo I developed today.

M7, Summilux 50 v2, Rollei RPX 25 in R09 One Shot 1+50

 

 

Massimo

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M7, summicron-M 35 ASPH, RPX 25, SF 20

 

 

 

Massimo

Edited by MaDeVa
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I got to spend a couple of days in Denmark years ago while on another assignment.  I wish I had taken more and better photos, but I hope you enjoy these.  

 

 

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A couple from today, carrying two cameras!

Pentax K1000, 150/3.5, XP2, HC-110, X1 scan:

Vine leaves by chrism229, on Flickr

 

Nikon FM3a, 85/1.8, TMax 100, HC-110, X1 scan:

Bullrush by chrism229, on Flickr

 

Chris

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As above

Massimo

Massimo,

 

The mood on the boat is nicely captured. The RPX25 like the Pan-F, shows a very smooth greyscale, with a tendency to drown the blacks a bit, which gives these pictures a unique character.

 

Best regards

 

Christoph

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Thanks, Jean-Marc.  That hair style is in fashion no with young boys.  I have to bite my tongue every time I see him.  

 

Thanks, Kevin.  We were just after breakfast, which helps explain the jovial mood

 

 

good one, Philip!

 

 

 

Hi Philip -

 

My normal ETTR approach with C41 and family or junky photos is to take a reading of incident light that is more or less illuminating the subject that I want to shoot, and then open up another stop or stop and a half.  So on a perfectly sunny day with portra 400 if the meter says f16 (or close to it) at 1/500 I would probably shoot at f8.5 or 11 and 1/500.  There typically areas in the scene that don't have as much light coverage and so the extra bit of exposure will keep the strong detail in these areas and preserve the detail in the highlights.

 

In the cinestill scenes above, I think I was shooting a good 2 stops over what the meter reading said.

 

With landscapes and such where I want to be really careful, I will use my spot meter to take an average of the lightest and darkest areas that I want detail, and then I usually will increase the exposure by a half or even a full stop depending on the level of contrast.

 

With E6, it depends on what film I am shooting,.  I have just shot several dozen rolls of provia 100F and velvia 50.  I normally found that I could narrow down the correct exposure with my spot meter by:

-with Provia 100F, metering for the brightest part that I want detail (usually zone 7.3 or so); then I would take another shot with the exposure reduced by a half stop.  I have found that most of the time the slide that has been stopped down an extra half stop is the more correct exposure.

 

-with Velvia 50, metering for the highlights, as above, taking the shot and then taking another shot with a half stop increase in exposure.  I usually find that the slide with the extra half stop is the more correctly exposed shot.    This is consistent with what you hear on the internet about velvia 50 really being an ISO 40 film and how many people will rate it at 40 iso. 

 

Best, Adam

Philip - i dont think i was clear on how i meter for the slide film. When i said that i metered for the highlights as a starting point and first of two exposures for both the provia and velvia, I meant that I place the 1 degree spot in my meter to the brightest Point that I want detail and then I press the "H" button which gives an exposure reading based on the highlights. I find that the reading that my meter gives will put the brightest part of the scene at exposure value 7.3 or so. I have read that exposing for the highlights should put this reading at exposure value seven. But The way my meter reads it seems OK to me as a reference point.

I am sure that this is obvious to everyone but i just wanted to correct what i said yesterday as in reading it again it did not make sense

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Under and Over the Elbe, Hamburg. Leica M1 with 35mm Biogon C, portra 400. Tony.

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Thank you for describing your process in such detail, Adam. It is very interesting to read about your process.

 

It's quite a bit more advanced than how I expose. I simply overexpose all colour negative film. The main reason is to deal with the absolutely horrible shadow noise that my Coolscan produces, which I hate with a vengeance. This is in fact a main reason that I consider another scanner or even going the digitizing route. Shadow noise, even when dealt with by ACR' or Photoshop's filters, often ruins my impression of my colour negative images. Perhaps I'm just odd to focus so much on this. I am truly impressed whenever I see beautiful scans of colour negative film that don't suffer from this terrible affliction.

 

I shoot my slide film at box speed and rely on the meter. That said, regardless of the film in the camera, I will of course point the camera's meter area at relevant parts of the image to prevent that the meter gets fooled by stronger points of light etc. It usually works, but not always.

 

Br

Philip

 

Philip - i dont think i was clear on how i meter for the slide film. When i said that i metered for the highlights as a starting point and first of two exposures for both the provia and velvia, I meant that I place the 1 degree spot in my meter to the brightest Point that I want detail and then I press the "H" button which gives an exposure reading based on the highlights. I find that the reading that my meter gives will put the brightest part of the scene at exposure value 7.3 or so. I have read that exposing for the highlights should put this reading at exposure value seven. But The way my meter reads it seems OK to me as a reference point.
I am sure that this is obvious to everyone but i just wanted to correct what i said yesterday as in reading it again it did not make sense

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Thank you for describing your process in such detail, Adam. It is very interesting to read about your process.

 

It's quite a bit more advanced than how I expose. I simply overexpose all colour negative film. The main reason is to deal with the absolutely horrible shadow noise that my Coolscan produces, which I hate with a vengeance. This is in fact a main reason that I consider another scanner or even going the digitizing route. Shadow noise, even when dealt with by ACR' or Photoshop's filters, often ruins my impression of my colour negative images. Perhaps I'm just odd to focus so much on this. I am truly impressed whenever I see beautiful scans of colour negative film that don't suffer from this terrible affliction.

 

I shoot my slide film at box speed and rely on the meter. That said, regardless of the film in the camera, I will of course point the camera's meter area at relevant parts of the image to prevent that the meter gets fooled by stronger points of light etc. It usually works, but not always.

 

Br

Philip

Interesting, Philip. That is the great thing about film, the ability to shoot the hell out of the highlights without killing them off. I find myself, though, hesitating to ettr too much out of fear that doing so with degrade the sharpness and color saturation. You seem to manage that concern quite well.

 

As for the slide film, i dont know how i could get along without the precise metering of the highlights. With the exampmes that i have even a mere half stop difference can affect the color saturation (and shifts) and of course kill the highlight detail. I have many examples that i will share in due course over the coming months!

Edited by A miller
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That must be a New Yorkie [emoji3]

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LOL, good one,Gary.

 

 

Nice, I can see a bit of Elliott Erwitt in these

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Thanks; my wife's family can be quite silly sometimes
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Thank you. Well unless I feel the highlights are necessary to keep intact, I just expose slide film for what I want the image to show. Like in the below shot. I had to hold the camera down and a bit to the right to ensure the brighter parts in the top and left parts wouldn't confuse the meter. 

 

I agree that highlights in scanned TIFFs quite easily begin to "pull" in various unwanted colour directions once one starts to edit. I mainly use Adobe Camera Raw for my editingn and the Highlights slider, which is often really amazing, can cause dull wrongly coloured highlights if overdone. But I will accept that on occasion if the rest, main part of the image looks OK. I'm not too picky to be honest as this is just a hobby.

 

Buza, Dubrovnik | Flickr

90 Elmarit-M

 

As a comparison, this shot is Fuji Superia 400 at EI100, inverted in Color Perfect. In one of the recent upgrades to CP, a new function was created whereby one can cycle through various "starting points" called things like Basic, Fresh start, Optimised etc. I can't find much rhyme, reason or logic in terms of how they function on different images - sometimes Optimised gives the best (most accurate) starting point for further editing, but other times it's the Basic option. Anyway, the image below shows pretty well how the light was on that exceptionally hot day. 

 

Sveti Stefan | Flickr

90 Elmarit-M

 

 

Interesting, Philip. That is the great thing about film, the ability to shoot the hell out of the highlights without killing them off. I find myself, though, hesitating to ettr too much out of fear that doing so with degrade the sharpness and color saturation. You seem to manage that concern quite well.

As for the slide film, i dont know how i could get along without the precise metering of the highlights. With the exampmes that i have even a mere half stop difference can affect the color saturation (and shifts) and of course kill the highlight detail. I have many examples that i will share in due course over the coming months!

 

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