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Doc Henry

I like film...(open thread)

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Continuing my doggy theme, here are two of my earlier pooches (rescue dogs) shot in 1998.

Hasselblad+ 150mm Sonnar.

Film: Kodak VPH - 2 9029

 

Two ways of seeing the same thing!

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One of the islands I camped on after another day's paddling during a 10-day self supported canoe trek through Varmland in Sweden.

 

Aluminium canoes were originally made by the Grumman Aircraft Co. when they were looking for ways to use up stocks of aircraft alloy after WW2. Some paddlers make fun of Grumman/Inkas canoes, but many people, including me, think they are a great wilderness trekking canoe. Tough as old boots and very seaworthy, I was caught in a howling blizzard crossing Stora Gla a couple of days after making this image. 7 kilometres of hard paddling straight into the teeth of the storm with big, breaking swells. The boat was impeccable!

 

 

Fuji Superia 400

Canon Sureshot A-1 35mm fixed lens waterproof camera

 

Love the story behind the making of (and the photo too with it's lovely light) especially the tribute to your boat! Got any more photo's?

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Trio of nosy yearlings

2000FCW with 80 Planar

Tri-X 400 in R09 @ 1:50

Epson 4870

Gary

 

This photo pops up from time to time on "Favourite Images" I'm glad it does for it is a favourite (for me) the brave and successful cropping, the tones and especially the curious animals.

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This photograph is lovely Edward, the thoughtful composition, human interaction and the warm colours!

Thank you very much Charles. Greatly appreciate your comments.

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unbenannt-0001-265.jpg

 

M4-2 2/50IV portra400

 

Joachim

I like the fresh but muted,almost duotone gamut of this image, Joachim. I see so many similar woodland images where the colours are oversaturated, especially in the yellows & greens. Well done!

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Bollard Cadmium Yellow

M-A Thambar-M f/2.2 CS ND6 ADOX Color Implosion

 

The parentheses of paranoia
With the ghost of meta-data
The ubiquitous, overlooked bollard
And demarcations of the borders
Zones, no-go, yes-go, maybe-go
Watch it, wherever you go
The cadence of surveillance
The grays of face recognition

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Rog, you're a breath of fresh air. Where else would one get such insightful, personalized and considered commentary on their pictures? I love it that the conversation between you and Wayne has expanded to encompass all sorts of considerations of the nexus - the confluence as you call it - between painting and photography (I see a strong Rothko in "Vertical Orange"). Also the intuition you bring to looking at pictures. Looking at pictures - that's the key. It is like looking at "the next building" or "our backyard" or wherever else we may happen (if we're particularly sagacious and/or lucky) to find pictures in the oft-overlooked voids. Because once these pictures are appropriated into our cameras and, through a process of transformation via scanning/printing/processing are shared with our audience, we are all granted access to the uncovering of mystery and, hopefully, we are therein better armed to see these things ourselves. You have elucidated things about my pictures that I never imagined - thank you! - and that I feel really great about knowing. The mock fragment poem - who ever knew such a thing existed? - but, yes - once the association is made, the affiliation of my picture with that vogue is a source of immense pride.

 

It helps (a lot!) to have an online dictionary and Wikipedia at hand to read your posts, but I thoroughly enjoy both the learning and the consequence of being more aware of elements in photographs - even my own pictures - that you seem able to divine at will. Thank you.

 

Thank you for your generous comments and insightful dialogue. You’re absolutely right that this piece evokes Rothko, owing not only to the color fields but arranging them vertically.

 

For me, the big take away in our conversation is the realization that the status of photography has been elevated by painters who use photographs, whether their own or print media, as the starting point of their work, painters we all know, such as Richter, Bacon, Close, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Celmins, and more. They have in essence reversed the role of photography being the stepchild of painting.

 

As a result of the Forum discussion, I have taken a pause to rethink what I am doing. The scaffolding I am using in approaching color constructs is to remove the sense of history, the sense that the photograph is a memory, somehow evidence of the past. Eliminating the human figure from photograph and focusing instead on sensory impressions of color. Minimize the evidence of artifact. Divorce sentimentality by sublimation or the absence of objects. These are the ideas I am entertaining. As with street photography, I am capitalizing on chance discoveries.

 

For me, the color construct exists in the now. It is not sentimental directly, but there is the push and pull in the color fields; viewing from a distance, the colors dominate in an abstract sense of color, but on closer scrutiny, details of the construct become apparent, the texture of color surfaces, details that betray evidence of the actuality of the surface, the interplay of reflections at times as opposed to absorption, glass or polished steel in counterpoint to non-reflective surfaces. Most importantly, though, is the tension or harmony of one color contrasted with another. The emotional tone, rhythm in the orchestration. I have been kind of consciously running this awareness through my head as a result of conversations on the Forum, instead of navigating on instinct alone.

 

Ironically, one element I have become more aware of is perspective, even though these photographs reduce the playing field to two dimensions. For the most part, perspective has been eliminated, which emphasizes the nuances of the color field alone, yet, in a way, redefines the notion of perspective in the Renaissance sense of providing a window “to see through.” Durer’s definition of perspective. Creating the dimensional view of the world through a window, which gives the illusion of a three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. In “seeing through a window” constructed by the artist, the viewer enjoys the perspective, the vision, of the artist. The “vision” can be not only literal but metaphoric or allegorical which poses responses to the question of the subtext or the meaning of the work.  On the flipside of this is the concept that the work is a mirror. We do not have to be restricted to an either/or definition, either, since the work can be simultaneously both a window and a mirror. It is ironic that the first photograph from nature was taken by Niepce in 1826 of “A View from a Window at Le Gras.”

 

As I amble along, I want to explore color “without color”, which is what Gerhard Richter has done with his painting using the source material of black-and-white photographs. I realize there’s no such thing as color without color, but that is the name of Richter’s book, Ohne Farbe (Without Color), that catalogs some of his “without color” paintings. What I will try are monochromatic gray color fields shot in color and that luckily I can punctuate with some other narrow line of color, like Barnett Newman’s “zips”.  I am thinking of Adam’s very cool blur photograph of Stormy, Foggy Morning, all gray tones accented with yellow, green, and one red bokeh.

 

There goes that painter’s influence! It’s a problem to unthink what you’ve been thinking. Dostoevsky said it best in his 1863 account "Winter Notes on Summer Impressions": “Try to pose for yourself this task: not to think of a polar bear, and you will see that the cursed thing will come to mind every minute."

 

Plum Veridian Diptych

M-A Thambar-M f/2.2 CS ND6 ADOX Color Implosion

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Really beautiful panorama.  Love that Velvia, too!

Thanks, Charles. I do have some which need to be scanned.

Looking down from the summit of Great Gable onto the flat top of Kirk Fell (my campsite for the night), with Pillar, Ennerdale, High Stile and a hint of Buttermere on the far right. The Irish Sea beyond.

Hasselblad XPan 2 with 45mm lens
Fuji Velvia 50

 

Wow, Ernest, your Adox is so clean and balanced.  You have tamed the beast!!

 

Bollard Cadmium Yellow

M-A Thambar-M f/2.2 CS ND6 ADOX Color Implosion

 

The parentheses of paranoia
With the ghost of meta-data
The ubiquitous, overlooked bollard
And demarcations of the borders
Zones, no-go, yes-go, maybe-go
Watch it, wherever you go
The cadence of surveillance
The grays of face recognition

 

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My attempt at taming the Adox Color Implosion beast

London Tube

Edited by A miller

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My attempt at taming the Adox Color Implosion beast

London Tube

 

Super-amped with your ADOX blurs and your OOF skylines/bridges; totally rattling the Richter scale. Composition of London Tube is dialed in with the little sign upper left, main focus looking left, closest blurred figure adding perspective dimension, swoosh tube horizontal contrasted with the stationary tube advertising for ". . . from the Director of Dark Knight. . . ." I'm hearing SFX, but I suppose that's circus in the head. Applause, applause. Throw some more OOF on the table, the roulette wheel is spinning.

 

CORRECTION:

My bad: Bollard Red and Plum Viridian Diptych are ADOX, BUT I double-checked and Bollard Cadmium Yellow is that really tamed ADOX beast that goes by PORTRA 400!

 

Rog

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As a distraction from the Implosions here, I'm back to Cinque Terre.

Monterosso

R6 wirth 35 and 50 Summicron

Portra 400

Plustek 8100

Gary

 

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Thank you for your generous comments and insightful dialogue. You’re absolutely right that this piece evokes Rothko, owing not only to the color fields but arranging them vertically.

 

For me, the big take away in our conversation is the realization that the status of photography has been elevated by painters who use photographs, whether their own or print media, as the starting point of their work, painters we all know, such as Richter, Bacon, Close, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Celmins, and more. They have in essence reversed the role of photography being the stepchild of painting.

 

As a result of the Forum discussion, I have taken a pause to rethink what I am doing. The scaffolding I am using in approaching color constructs is to remove the sense of history, the sense that the photograph is a memory, somehow evidence of the past. Eliminating the human figure from photograph and focusing instead on sensory impressions of color. Minimize the evidence of artifact. Divorce sentimentality by sublimation or the absence of objects. These are the ideas I am entertaining. As with street photography, I am capitalizing on chance discoveries.

 

For me, the color construct exists in the now. It is not sentimental directly, but there is the push and pull in the color fields; viewing from a distance, the colors dominate in an abstract sense of color, but on closer scrutiny, details of the construct become apparent, the texture of color surfaces, details that betray evidence of the actuality of the surface, the interplay of reflections at times as opposed to absorption, glass or polished steel in counterpoint to non-reflective surfaces. Most importantly, though, is the tension or harmony of one color contrasted with another. The emotional tone, rhythm in the orchestration. I have been kind of consciously running this awareness through my head as a result of conversations on the Forum, instead of navigating on instinct alone.

 

Ironically, one element I have become more aware of is perspective, even though these photographs reduce the playing field to two dimensions. For the most part, perspective has been eliminated, which emphasizes the nuances of the color field alone, yet, in a way, redefines the notion of perspective in the Renaissance sense of providing a window “to see through.” Durer’s definition of perspective. Creating the dimensional view of the world through a window, which gives the illusion of a three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. In “seeing through a window” constructed by the artist, the viewer enjoys the perspective, the vision, of the artist. The “vision” can be not only literal but metaphoric or allegorical which poses responses to the question of the subtext or the meaning of the work.  On the flipside of this is the concept that the work is a mirror. We do not have to be restricted to an either/or definition, either, since the work can be simultaneously both a window and a mirror. It is ironic that the first photograph from nature was taken by Niepce in 1826 of “A View from a Window at Le Gras.”

 

As I amble along, I want to explore color “without color”, which is what Gerhard Richter has done with his painting using the source material of black-and-white photographs. I realize there’s no such thing as color without color, but that is the name of Richter’s book, Ohne Farbe (Without Color), that catalogs some of his “without color” paintings. What I will try are monochromatic gray color fields shot in color and that luckily I can punctuate with some other narrow line of color, like Barnett Newman’s “zips”.  I am thinking of Adam’s very cool blur photograph of Stormy, Foggy Morning, all gray tones accented with yellow, green, and one red bokeh.

 

There goes that painter’s influence! It’s a problem to unthink what you’ve been thinking. Dostoevsky said it best in his 1863 account "Winter Notes on Summer Impressions": “Try to pose for yourself this task: not to think of a polar bear, and you will see that the cursed thing will come to mind every minute."

 

Plum Veridian Diptych

M-A Thambar-M f/2.2 CS ND6 ADOX Color Implosion

 

The more, I guess, we see our photography (our art) as a stylistic construct, the simpler it is to find photographs everywhere - at will. We might therefore think that there is no great art in it (because it's everywhere), but there is.

 

In the great movie (to my mind, the greatest I've seen) Lawrence of Arabia, In a quiet moment with a few soldiers in a room Lawrence extinguishes a match with his fingers without flinching. One of the soldiers looking on tries the same thing and exclaims "Oooh! It damn well 'urts". Lawrence replies "Certainly it hurts". The soldier then asks him "So what's the trick then?" to which Lawrence replies "The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts.".

 

This of course has nothing to do with the discussion at hand.

 

Or does it?

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I seem to like "torture testing" my little Canon ltm 50mm lens by constantly shooting it into the sun. Objectively it doesn't really handle it all that well, but then there's the visceral judgement:

 

 

Tootgarook 2018

M6TTL, Canon ltm 50mm f1.4, Agfa Vista 400

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