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My daughter with her favorite horse, Rumba.

Photo not perfect, but I like the movement

Edited by nicolaspinel
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My niece rides as well and it's always tough to get a shot of the pair when you're standing behind a gate so far away from the action, but you seem to manage it quite well in that first shot! I really like the movement too

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When shooting horse riding then it's essential to capture the right phases—especially in gallop. In both pictures, you caught the moment when the inner fore leg is on the ground. This does not look very good. The most favourable phases include those where all four legs are in mid-air (in trot and gallop) or where the outer hind leg is just forcing off the ground (in gallop). Unfortunately, these phases are short, so when just snapping away, it's unlikely to capture them by chance. Instead, you'll need to deliberately go for them. Try it next time when you're photographing your daughter on horseback ... but it will take some practice to get it right every time (or, well, most of the time). It's pretty hard to get it all right in one frame—the feel of the motion, the rider's expression, the picture's background, and the phase of the horse's movement. That's why horse riding is a fairly difficult subject for a photographer.

 

Furthermore, in pictures meant for formal purposes (so everything must be absolutely perfect), the fore leg closer to the beholder always should be the one that is reaching out. Look at the illustrations in horse-riding books or the photos in high-class riding magazines (not those about reining or western riding), and you'll see what I mean.

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Thanks 01 !

 

A quick search on google to find horse riding pictures and I see perfectly what you mean. Most of pictures I found have exactly the caracteristics that you explained.

And I understant too the challenge it is to capture the moment !

By chance for me ( or not ! lol ) my daughter has a jumping competition this sunday...

I know what I have to do !

Hope to be able to come back here sunday evening or monday with a good result.

Thanks again for this very good advise

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By chance for me (or not! lol) my daughter has a jumping competition this Sunday ... I know what I have to do!

Fence jumping is slightly different. Here, choosing a good viewpoint and focusing on the spot is easy because you'll precisely know beforehand where the action is going to take place—over the fence. However, again it's important to catch the best moment. Usually, that's the moment just before the culmination point of the jump, when the horse is over the fence but still in the ascending part of the curve. The landing phase usually does not look so nice ... of course, exceptions to the rule may happen (as with any rule).

 

And oh, by the way—forgot to mention that I really like your first picture above (the second, not so much). You got a dense composition and a dynamic capture of the motion. Well done! Still there's some room for improvement ... it's always the details that separate the good from the exceptional ...

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01af...

 

....how many challenges do you intend to give me in the week-end ?!

 

joke !

 

I'm just a very very young padawan in the prestigious Leica community and to be honest I still have difficulties to make a basic portrait !

 

Thanks again for this other very good advice

 

My eyes will not watch the scene this week-end as they would have done before your posts.

Clearly I appreciate very much the time you take to explain and to coach me in this topic.

Thanks +++

Edited by nicolaspinel
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My tests of this week-end

The only ones acceptables, not for the photos of course I know the pics have nothing special !

It was not possible to be nearest and clearly at this distance it's not for the X2.

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  • 2 months later...
Nice to see some horse and rider images showing motion. Most enjoyable.

 

I agree with Bill. So just keep at it and keep taking lots of shots, that's the best way to insure that you end up with something you are pleased with.

This is a very difficult photo genre. It is so easy to get the horse and/or the rider looking awkward and unbalanced. The photographer's eye is always behind

the action, so it's mostly a matter of luck if you get the "perfect" shot, which is why you need to keep clicking, lots.

When photographing a horse and rider over jumps you will find that it becomes easier to get a pretty shot when the jumps are a lot higher than those in your photographs,

the horse remains in the air longer and the whole procedure is more graceful, plus competitors jumping higher courses tend to be more experienced riders and so present a

more balanced combination of horse and rider for the camera.

Dee.

Edited by platypus
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When shooting horse riding then it's essential to capture the right phases—especially in gallop. In both pictures, you caught the moment when the inner fore leg is on the ground. This does not look very good. The most favourable phases include those where all four legs are in mid-air (in trot and gallop) or where the outer hind leg is just forcing off the ground (in gallop). Unfortunately, these phases are short, so when just snapping away, it's unlikely to capture them by chance. Instead, you'll need to deliberately go for them. Try it next time when you're photographing your daughter on horseback ... but it will take some practice to get it right every time (or, well, most of the time). It's pretty hard to get it all right in one frame—the feel of the motion, the rider's expression, the picture's background, and the phase of the horse's movement. That's why horse riding is a fairly difficult subject for a photographer.

 

Furthermore, in pictures meant for formal purposes (so everything must be absolutely perfect), the fore leg closer to the beholder always should be the one that is reaching out. Look at the illustrations in horse-riding books or the photos in high-class riding magazines (not those about reining or western riding), and you'll see what I mean.

 

This is excellent, thanks!

 

As for the photos, now looking at them I see what O1af is saying, but I still like the movement in the first one!

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