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Buffalo Herd


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Buffalo herd on the Kalispell Tribal Lands in northeast Washington State, U.S.A.

The Kalispell Tribe keeps a healthy herd of buffalo in respect to their historical connection with the animal.

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Bill,

What amazing animals they are, truly prehistoric.

We have had some young ones being imported to Australia over the last few

years for use in training horses for "campdrafting" (something along the lines of

your cutting competitions) the theory being that Buffalo tend to run in an undeviatingly straight line when chased, instead of ducking

and weaving as cattle do and this is beneficial for a novice horse. The sight of them wandering about our countryside causes great consternation

as you can imagine, cars screeching to a stop, people jumping out with cameras!

Dee.

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Bill,

 

A fine pair of shots of those magnificent animals. These remind me of the ones we seen in Yellowstone N.P. several years ago. They are huge animals and yet some tourists were approaching them as they were grazing in a pasture. Not a good idea.

 

Paul

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hanks Stuart,

 

The blue/green backdrop of the trees is interesting to me also. With the dampness, grayish aspens and general White Pine color it comes to look unnatural to people not familiar with this part of the northwest. The blue/green bump near the Buffalo's is something man made. I sure was not going to walk up to it to investigate. LOL

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Stuart,

 

Your mention of the blue cast in the evergreens made me stop and give it some thought. In my geographic area the blue cast is very common but a more green look would seem more natural to most people living elsewhere. I did a small adjustment in the color temperature value (Kelvin value) to adjust for more green.

 

Thanks for pointing it out to me.

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Thanks Ece &K-H,

 

The color correction is an interesting thing to me. During damp weather our pine forests take on a bluish cast. Living here it seems so natural but people in other areas may not find it so. That kind of creates an interesting situation. An image with the bluish cast would really connect well with viewers in the northwest but maybe not with someone say down in Florida. I did a minor color adjustment but I'm not sure I should have bothered as that does not really look natural to me. To the southwest of me just over in eastern Oregon are the Blue Mountains. I wonder how they got their name? LOL

 

 

At any rate, this color issue has been interesting to me.

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Bill,

 

truly very good pictures not only because of the animal but because of the combination with this type of colour. Although the hue seems not familiar to us it is a perfect match for the furry sturdy animals. It gives a touch of mystery and exotic character.

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Bill,

I think your original "blue" trees are correct, there is no colour cast

apparent anywhere else in the image, for example the tree in the

foreground or the animals themselves. They are obviously just blue

trees, strange as that may seem!

Dee.

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Thanks for the interesting comment Dee.

I took the image last weekend while in that area to take pictures of Tundra Swans. Didn't see any swans so I'm going back in a few days to try again. (that's part of the fun with photography). While there I'll re-shoot the buffalo just to see how the colors come out. I may have become overly focused on the blue look of the trees. Thinking more about it, I have an evergreen in my front yard that's called a Colorado Blue Spruce. I find that kind of funny after all my going on about the trees.

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Bill,

I think your original "blue" trees are correct, there is no colour cast

apparent anywhere else in the image, for example the tree in the

foreground or the animals themselves. They are obviously just blue

trees, strange as that may seem!

Dee.

 

I tend to agree (in the second version the grass i less "natural"... but this is a wonderful image that deserves a careful processing and a well tuned print : probably, a finely managed adjustement of the trees only (just to lose A BIT of blue) without impacting the terrain can give an excellent result also for print (I did observe that some blue casts that look "acceptable" on screen do result "annoying" on print...)

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Thanks Ece &K-H,

 

The color correction is an interesting thing to me. During damp weather our pine forests take on a bluish cast. Living here it seems so natural but people in other areas may not find it so. That kind of creates an interesting situation. An image with the bluish cast would really connect well with viewers in the northwest but maybe not with someone say down in Florida. I did a minor color adjustment but I'm not sure I should have bothered as that does not really look natural to me. To the southwest of me just over in eastern Oregon are the Blue Mountains. I wonder how they got their name? LOL

 

 

At any rate, this color issue has been interesting to me.

 

Bill is quite correct about the blue cast of the evergreen forest foliage in the Pacific Northwest under damp conditions. In dry conditions, that is in the summer and early fall, it is 100°F and around 10% humidity much of the time. Under these conditions the trees are green. EXCEPT the Tamarak trees that inspired me to take this photo at Troy northern Idaho in the fall of '75 on Agfachrome.

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Bill is quite correct about the blue cast of the evergreen forest foliage in the Pacific Northwest under damp conditions. In dry conditions, that is in the summer and early fall, it is 100°F and around 10% humidity much of the time. Under these conditions the trees are green. EXCEPT the Tamarak trees that inspired me to take this photo at Troy northern Idaho in the fall of '75 on Agfachrome.

 

Thanks Orient for reminding me about how the temperature and humidity levels effect the trees in the Pacific Northwest. It definitely effects the color of the evergreens The Tamarak (Western Larch) are always interesting with how the look like just another evergreen until Fall when they drop their needles and take on the look of a dead tree.

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