Jump to content

Brief M post on LuLa by Sean Reid


Jeff S

Recommended Posts

I don't know how many LUF members read Sean's work, but you can get a good sense of his clear writing and sensibility. He's well protected here what he charges for, but as a general conveyance of how the M performs, this should be as helpful to all as what Michael Hussmann and Holgar Spar published in LFI, what Ming Thein has published, and what Jono and Chris have given us.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know how many LUF members read Sean's work, but you can get a good sense of his clear writing and sensibility. He's well protected here what he charges for, but as a general conveyance of how the M performs, this should be as helpful to all as what Michael Hussmann and Holgar Spar published in LFI, what Ming Thein has published, and what Jono and Chris have given us.

 

I agree, Sean Reid's writing style is certainly clear and sensible. But the same cannot be said for the design of his website which is downright awful. Content is delivered via a little flash window. It is also not possible to view his site using an iPad.

Link to post
Share on other sites

His suggestion that one needs to stop down the aperture after focussing in live-view mode, in addition to the increased shutter lag and 1 second post-exposure blackout makes the M240 sound like some sluggish 1960s relic, when it is not being used in its natural mode as a rangefinder camera with optical viewfinder. Clearly this is an area where future M upgrades are going to make this camera look like a dinosaur, as the EVF and live-view features eventually start to approximate their SLR counterparts in terms of latency.

 

Nick

Link to post
Share on other sites

His suggestion that one needs to stop down the aperture after focussing in live-view mode, in addition to the increased shutter lag and 1 second post-exposure blackout makes the M240 sound like some sluggish 1960s relic, when it is not being used in its natural mode as a rangefinder camera with optical viewfinder. Clearly this is an area where future M upgrades are going to make this camera look like a dinosaur, as the EVF and live-view features eventually start to approximate their SLR counterparts in terms of latency.

 

Nick

 

Nick - I think Sean makes it seem worse than it is. I shot two music gigs and a corporate event with the M-240 and used the EVF and Live View all the time when I had 135 or 90 on the body. I also shot with Viso macro equipment and with a Nikon Shift PC 28 lens. In all circumstances the experience was very positive and I didn't need to open up to focus accurately (I was fully open in the concert setting anyway :)) apart from in macro practice (when this really isn't an issue). The M isn't a substitute for a fast modern DSLR when it comes to working with long lenses, but it's a remarkable tool for those times when long lenses are only an occasional need...

 

While I recognise that there will be future iterations of the M, I'm happy to be putting my money on this first version, and see a good life span. I had 4 years with M9 and could have continued to work with them VERY happily if I weren't persuaded by the benefits of the M. As it is, IMHO, the 240 is an absolutely spectacular DRF which has some really useful additional facilities through its built in live view functionality... NOT a dinosaur...

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

His suggestion that one needs to stop down the aperture after focussing in live-view mode, in addition to the increased shutter lag and 1 second post-exposure blackout makes the M240 sound like some sluggish 1960s relic, when it is not being used in its natural mode as a rangefinder camera with optical viewfinder. Clearly this is an area where future M upgrades are going to make this camera look like a dinosaur, as the EVF and live-view features eventually start to approximate their SLR counterparts in terms of latency.

 

Nick

 

HI There Nick

I had a long and vigorous conversation with Sean about this (and friendly I might add).

 

We don't agree! Sean's point is that (unless you have focus shift) you get more accurate focus if you focus wide open and stop down. Which is probably correct. However!

 

My point was that you still get excellent focus with the M if you focus at the shooting aperture, and as an added bonus your subject hasn't gone off to have a cup of tea whilst they're wating!

 

Of course, you have the added bonus that the EVF gains up if the aperture is small, so its much easier to focus than an SLR when stopped down. Sometimes the best is the enemy of the good. I wouldn't dream of focusing open aperture with the EVF and the M unless I was shooting a static subject with the camera on a tripod.

 

All the best

Edited by jonoslack
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

added bonus that the EVF gains up if the aperture is small' date=' so its much easier to focus than an SLR when stopped down. Sometimes the best is the enemy of the good. I wouldn't dream of focusing open aperture with the EVF and the M unless I was shooting a static subject with the camera on a tripod.

 

All the best[/quote']

 

Hi Jono what are you referring to with SLRs? They focus with aperture wide open and only stop down the iris immediately before exposure...unless you are talking about older mechanically fixed lenses.

 

Anyway I'd be curious how many folks buying the new M have used live view with focus peaking on a camera before? To me, the experience of EVF and focus peaking was not near as enjoyable as RF focusing but valuable in certain situations.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having shot with quite a few EVF based cameras I have to agree with Sean. It can be almost impossible to tell where focus is even in magnified view with the lens stopped down. This was a big problem in trying to manual focus the X100. It has been fixed on the X100s per Sean's just released review of the X100s today. The long blackout is a major problem in shooting with the cameras that have the slower refresh rate. If you are trying to follow events and take shots, in 1 sec a lot can change and when you are looking through the EVF and suddenly all you see it blck and then when the image returns things have moved it is very disconcerting and throws off any rhythm you might be trying to develop. The OMD and the RX1 are the first two that I have used that have blackouts approaching what you see when using a DSLR with a mirror. It is just a blink. Compare the blink of an eye to closing your eyes and counting 1001 with no view of the world to see the effect.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...