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Squirrels with a 1935 lens


hhmrogers

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Here are a couple of shots taken this year with a IIIc and a 9cm Elmar. The serial number is 260066 which puts it somewhere in 1935. It's coated now but wasn't originally. Film was Ilford XP2 Super.

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An excellent pair. The lens seems to give you fine sharpness, tones and lovely bokeh.

 

Paul

 

Thanks Paul! Also I like squirrels and could watch them for hours, though I certainly don't want them breaking into my roof-space!

 

I haven't yet had a good try with this lens on either M8 or M-E. I've had it for a long time but as I have a 1960 equivalent I've been using that. My more modern lenses of other focal lengths give me much better contrast which isn't really surprising. I did have an 85mm Jupiter which was OK-ish but sold it on not long ago. Although it opened up to f2, which can be handy, it wasn't as sharp as the M-Elmar in mid range.

 

Righjt now it's a bit cold outside and waiting patiently to catch squirrel antics isn't my idea of fun! Those two were shot through the kitchen door.

 

Henry

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...........I too have a IIIc, serial number No 433740 which makes it May 1947, the year and month of my birth. My wife says it has weathered better than I have.

 

My IIIc is 514429 which puts it in 1950. But the 1935 Elmar, well that's the year my wife and I were born. We reckon it was a pretty good year of course, and the lens is OK too.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Pauledell - I'm not sure the bokeh totally arises from the lens. The "reticulated film" look of the oof areas is typical of Ilford chromogenic films. I was given a beta version of their first chromogenic film by an Ilford worker and put it in my Ig. I really disliked the bokeh areas and never used another one.

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Pauledell - I'm not sure the bokeh totally arises from the lens. The "reticulated film" look of the oof areas is typical of Ilford chromogenic films. I was given a beta version of their first chromogenic film by an Ilford worker and put it in my Ig. I really disliked the bokeh areas and never used another one.

 

Gosh, Ilford's first chromgenic film, that really was a few years back! According to the Harman site: "1980 worlds first chromogenic film introduced - XP1", "1991 XP2 replaces XP1", "1998 introduced third generation chromogenic film - XP2 Super" Particles of dye forming an image in the emulsion are bound to look different from particles of silver and we can't avoid that with colour film. I had some XP2 Super in the fridge and I'm using it up; I do prefer HP5S. I recently tried developing XP2 Super in Rodinal using the time suggested in the Massive Development Chart. It worked quite well.

Edited by hhmrogers
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