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MRJohn

New M: how about sensor dust and shutter implementation?

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Sensor dust:

I really like my M9P but it is a magnet for sensor dust. With the new M I can imagine it can get even worse with liveview. Any information if there is a dust-removal function? Any ideas how much we will have to deal with dust with this camera?

 

Which brings me to my second question, how is the shutter implemented:

Is there no mechanical shutter blade and the sensor is always visible? Is the shutter implemented fully via the COMSIS sensor, or will a blade shutter kick in with very short shutter speeds? According to the website of COMSIS, the sensor itself must have a shutter function as it can take several hundred images per second for the movie function.

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Sensor dust:

I really like my M9P but it is a magnet for sensor dust. With the new M I can imagine it can get even worse with liveview. Any information if there is a dust-removal function? Any ideas how much we will have to deal with dust with this camera?

 

Which brings me to my second question, how is the shutter implemented:

Is there no mechanical shutter blade and the sensor is always visible? Is the shutter implemented fully via the COMSIS sensor, or will a blade shutter kick in with very short shutter speeds? According to the website of COMSIS, the sensor itself must have a shutter function as it can take several hundred images per second for the movie function.

 

1. Dust where detected is interpolated out by software (says the specs).

2. There is a metal shutter which is open for live view.

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Watch Thorsten Overgaard's interview with Stefan Daniel...they go thru these details, including comparing shutter noises, the different ways the shutter works depending on whether live view is on, even the new tripod mount in the bottom (no longer part of the plate but part of the body itself), etc. it doesn't answer all of our questions, but is a pretty good overview and practical. We'll only be able to really know all answers once they start shipping the final products.

 

It's on Thorsten's website.

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1. Dust where detected is interpolated out by software (says the specs).

 

I see 'Dust detection' in the PDF 'technical data' sheet - no mention of 'interpolated out by software'.

 

My M9 does dust detection quite well - when there is dust on the sensor, it puts big blotches in my photo to help me locate the dust.

 

-robert

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Thanks for pointing out the video from Thorsten, indeed there is a lot of information in there.

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