Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Olof

Radioaktive optische Gläser...

Recommended Posts

Guest Olof

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Wird Leitz/Leica ja wohl auch verbaut haben. Geschieht das auch noch heute, gibt es Objektive die für solche Gläser bekannt sind/waren. Welche besonderen Eigenschaften hatte diese und wie erreicht man diese Eigenschaften heute (wenn man sie erreicht) ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest lll

Wurden meines Wissens nach im Fotobereich nur bei den allerersten Summicronen verbaut. War ein thoriumhaltiges Spezialglas aus den Kodak Glaslaboratorien, das dann sehr bald durch ein eigenes ersetzt worden ist. Diese Summicrone sollen mit der Zeit einen deutlichen Gelbstich bekommen haben. Auf Fotopapier gelegt, sei nach 24 Stunden eine leichte Schwärzung zu erkennen gewesen.

 

Gruß Friedhelm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hallo Jan diese Merkmale errreicht man heute nicht mehr, aber übertrifft sie durch neue Rezepturen.

Leica verwendet seit der ISO-Zertifizierung ab 1996 keine radioaktiven Substanzen bzw. auch keine bleihaltigen Gläser.

Die ersten waren übrigens nach Kriegsende von den Amerikanern in Wetzlar zur Herstellung von Objektivlinsen verboten worden.

Übrigens gilt dies auch für alle anderen renommierten Hersteller wir Nikon, Canon, Sigma, Tamron, Zeiss, etc. etc.

Die Äußerung von III entspricht nicht den historischen Tatsachen, da radioaktive Gläser von den Amis verboten wurden.

Ich habe ein Summicron aus der ersten Serie und das ist garantiert strahlungsfrei!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Es ist hier vor kurzem schon festgestellt worden, daß für die erste Summicron-Serie

sicherlich kein thoriumhaltiges Glas verwendet worden ist, danach eine zeitlang sehr

wohl, dann wiederum nicht mehr. Hans Gerd Heuser hat dabei hilfreicherweise darauf

aufmerksam gemacht, in welch relativ unaufregender Weise Thorium radiaktiv ist.

 

str.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hallo,

ich hatte noch vor kurzer Zeit eine Thorium Oxyd (ThO2) haltige Summicron (SOOIC) die nicht ganz der erste Serie angehören sollte (Nr. 1009510).

Die Beta Strahlung ist jedoch gering (ca. 12 micro-Sievert/h direkt auf der Linse) im Vergleich zu manche Emaille die, zu der Zeit, im Schmuck Bereich ab und zu gebraucht waren.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest lll

Hi,

 

ich hatte meine Infos aus dem Gedächtnis von einem LHSA -Artikel, den ich versuche, hier auszugsweise einzustellen:

 

During World War II three new factors entered the lens

design arena:

1) Kodak had developed a new extremely high

refraction, low dispersion glass for aerial camera lenses.

This new glass used so-called “rare earth” elements and

had some thorium oxide in the mix, which was slightly

radioactive, but more about this shortly. One of these

lenses was the well known 178mm f/2.5 Aero-Ektar,

which had a relatively high speed and short focal length

for an aerial camera lens. It was designed to allow higher

shutter speeds with the films of the day so that sharp

photographs could be made from low flying high speed

reconnaissance aircraft in poor light, as well as by the

light of flares at night. The performance of this lens was

exceptional, even wide open, which I can attest to

having used one of these lenses for a number of years

adapted to a 4x5 inch Graflex camera. This new glass

from Kodak and other sources became available to Leitz

soon after the war, and Leitz started their own glass

works in 1949 to refine these glass types further. (Leitz

brochure “Oskar Barnack Centenary”, 1980, p.25)

2) A new process of coating lens surfaces with a thin film

of magnesium fluoride was developed, which diminished

the reflections of rays entering a glass surface by

substantial margins. This coating reduced internal

reflections within the lens, thus increasing light

transmission and contrast while reducing flare. This

made it possible for a lens to be designed with more air

to glass interfaces yet outperform a simpler uncoated

design in both contrast and light gathering power. This

coating probably made its first appearance in Leitz

camera lenses with the 85mm f/1.5 Summarex of 1943,

but all Leitz lenses were reportedly being coated by the

end of 1945.

3) During the war years the development of the

computer was accelerated. IBM punch-card machines

became available which were able compute ray paths in

lenses in hours and days rather than the months it used

to take a team of mathematicians using pencil and paper

and slide rules. Leitz was an early user of this new

technology, and is reported to have installed their own

computer as early as 1951 (Rogliatti, Leica and Leicaflex

Lenses 2nd edition with additions, 1984, p.8).

The new 50mm f/1.5 Summarit, first marketed in 1949,

was based on the design of the Xenon, but made good use

of coating and modification of the glass in some elements for

improved performance. It outperformed the f/2 Summitar

in both field flatness and evenness of resolution across the

frame, and work was soon begun to design a new 50mm f/2

to replace the Summitar. The new f/2 lens would require

fewer design compromises than the f/1.5 Summarit due to

its more conservative speed, and therefore was intended to

equal or surpass the performance of the Summarit by as

much as possible. It was perhaps a shipment of the new

Kodak high refractive thorium oxide glass that made this

improvement possible. But from whatever source, the new

glass enabled greater image quality. Prototypes of the new

f/2 lens design, marked Summitar* were made in 1950 and

given to selected photographers for testing. Randol Hooper

(VF #3, 1985) reports that serial numbers of the Summitar*

lie between 812242 and 812320 in 1950. A photograph of

Summitar* No. 812275 appears in G. Rogliatti’s Leica and

Leicaflex Lenses (first edition, 1978, on page 142; and in

second edition, 1984, on page 148). This lens is engraved

“Dumur” on the side, for Henri Dumur. Jim Lager’s Leica

Illustrated Guide II (1978) shows lens No. 812276 on page

35, and it also appears in his Leica Illustrated Guide Volume

II—Lenses, 1994, pp. 46 and 47. According to Dr. Cyril T.

Blood (Leica Historical Society of Britain Newsletter No.40)

the earliest trial Summitar* lenses may have had a somewhat

different optical design than the production Summicrons,

including minor differences in the mount such as a slightly

thinner aperture ring and non-click stops to f/22. It is

possible that this earlier lens was designed without the aid of

computer ray tracing, but it is reasonable to surmise that the

computer installed at Leitz in 1951 might have been used to

finalize the design of the lens first designated “Summicron”.

Radioactivity?

As I’m sure readers of Viewfinder are aware, the new

glass containing thorium oxide from Kodak, or elsewhere,

which was used in the early Summitar* (and in early

production Summicron lenses made before 1953) was

slightly radioactive. The three “hot” elements were shielded

from the film by a rear element made of relatively dense flint

glass which contained lead oxide (Dr. Cyril T. Blood, LHS

Newsletter No. 40). This element protected the film from

any fogging, even with the lens retracted. However there

were three adverse side effects of the hot glass in these early

lenses. First, the hot glass was somewhat yellow, and became

more yellow over the years (see Bill Gordon’s article in VF

1996 #3 for a very complete survey of radioactivity in the

early Summicron lenses). Second, since the high refraction

glass could not be used in the rear element close to the film,

large aperture correction of the lens could not be carried out

quite as completely as might have been possible. And, third,

the word “radioactive” had a sinister connotation in the

marketplace so soon after WW II, and Leitz was most likely

very reluctant to have this word attached to any of their

products. Nevertheless, small quantities of the new lens were

produced under the Summicron name starting in late 1951,

making this year of 2001 the 50th anniversary of one of the

most significant lenses in the history of the Leica camera.

As soon as Leitz was able to develop a new lanthanum

oxide LaK9 glass in their glass research department—a

replacement glass with the same specifications but which

emitted no radiation—the new lens could be manufactured

without any danger of this stigma. It was evidently not until

late 1952 or early 1953 that the LaK9 glass became available

in sufficient quantities to start full-scale production of the

new lens, however. So, even though there were small

numbers of Summicron lenses manufactured before this

using glass with varying amounts of thorium content, it

wasn’t until 1953 that the factory could go to large quantity

production, an announcement could be made, and the lens

formally listed in the catalog. Leitz made a point of

advertising the new Summicron as “thorium free”, and these

later lenses did not emit any detectable radiation.

(Note: soon after the availability of sufficient stocks of

the new LaK9 glass became available, Walter Mandler

undertook a redesign of the Summicron to take full

advantage of the new glass, without the design

constraints involved in keeping the mount as short as

possible or in keeping the new glass away from the rear

elements. The result was the “rigid” Summicron of

1956, which had increased correction at the widest

apertures, as well as in the close-up range. This lens will

be the subject of a future article).

Production

The beginning of production of the first lenses marked

“Summicron” seems to have occurred at approximately

920001 (Gordon) during 1951, going by the serial

numbers. A 1951 production lens No. 922001 is shown in

the ELNY announcement of the Summicron dated

May,1953. Jim Lager shows a photo of No. 922072 in his

Illustrated History, Vol. II, 1994, on page 55. These...

 

Fröhliches Lesen!

Friedhelm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Vielen Dank, Friedhelm, für die Mühe, diese ausführliche Darstellung wiederzufinden

und uns zum Lesen zu geben.

 

Wenn ich es recht verstehe, ist der Verfasser des Artikels der Überzeugung, daß

alle ersten Summicrone mit thoriumhaltigem Glas versehen waren. Meines mit der

Nummer 993 098 scheint aber nicht thoriumhaltig zu sein.

 

Übrigens ist die Vergütung mit Metalldampf, wenn ich recht weiß, früher schon als

beim Summarex von 1943 von Zeiss verwendet (und entwickelt?) worden. Ich

erinnere mich, sie an Sonnaren 1.5/50 vom Jahr 1941 gesehen zu haben.

 

Der hellgelbe Schimmer der Summicrone könnte auch ein Reflex der Vergütung

sein?

 

Freundlichst

str.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest lll

Hallo Stefan,

 

der Artikel widerspricht nicht Deiner Auffassung. Übersetzt heißt es dort: bei einem Leitz-Kameraobjektiv taucht die Vergütung wohl erstmals...

 

Und was die Radioaktivität der Gläser angeht, so spricht er ja von Chargen unterschiedlicher Radioaktivität. Könnte es nicht sein, dass Deine Optik nur sehr schwach strahlt?

 

Wie auch immer, ich bin kein Historiker, der hier die Quellen geprüft hätte und auch der journalistischen Seriositätspflicht, eine zweite Quelle hinzuzuziehen habe ich mich nicht unterworfen - schließlich ist es Hobby, nicht mehr.

 

Gruß Friedhelm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Der hellgelbe Schimmer der Summicrone könnte auch ein Reflex der Vergütung

sein?

 

Den Gelbstich, auf den in Verbindung mit frühen Summicronen immer wieder verwiesen wird, sieht man beim Durchschauen durch ein solches Objektiv (z.B. gegen eine weiße Fläche) recht deutlich. Es hat sich da tatsächlich das Glas selbst mit der Zeit ins gelbliche verfärbt. Allerdings war auch die Vergütung der ersten Summicrone gelblich, später dann blau-lila.

 

Andreas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest lll

Die Vergütung meines ältesten Summicrons (11533xx) zeigt sogar Spuren einer Mehrschichtvergütung. Die Reflexe sind violett und gelb. Eine Vergilbung des Glases ist zum Glück bisher auch nicht ansatzweise eingetreten. Aber selbst mein ältestes Nickel-Elmar, nicht vergütet und ohne Seriennummer, ist noch unvergilbt und fast ohne Schleier.

 

Gruß Friedhelm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

«der Artikel widerspricht nicht Deiner Auffassung. Übersetzt heißt es dort: bei einem

Leitz-Kameraobjektiv taucht die Vergütung wohl erstmals...»

 

Friedhelm, das war schon deutlich, deutlicher noch, daß alles richtig, aber nicht alles gesagt,

sondern etwas geschickt nicht dargestellt wird. Das wollte ich ergänzen. Soweit ich weiß,

waren die vergüteten Objektive bei Leitz und Zeiss währen des Krieges nicht für den allgemeinen

Erwerb zugänglich, sondern nur für militärische Zwecke einschließlich der Berichterstattung.

 

Gerade habe ich den früheren Physiklehrer meiner Kinder getroffen und nochmals

befragt: Er erklärte mir, daß bei einem hauptsächlichen Alphastrahler wie Thorium und

bei dessen geringer Strahlenmenge an einem Objektiv eine Strahlung nicht unbedingt

von außen mit Messen erkennbar sein müsse. Meine Aussage, daß mein frühes

Summicron kein Thorium enthalte, ist also entsprechend zu relativieren. Seltsam

ist dann, daß ein späteres Summicron mit einer Nummer von 1953 meßbar gestrahlt

hat, als der Physiker es mit dem Geigerzähler überprüft hat.

 

Daß die Summicrone allmählich gelber werden, halte ich aber noch wie vor für eher

unwahrscheinlich, es sei denn jemand habe eine chemische oder physikalische

Erklärung dafür. Der sehr gemütliche Zerfall des Thorium kann es ja wohl nicht

bewirken.

 

Freundlichst

str.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Daß die Summicrone allmählich gelber werden, halte ich aber noch wie vor für eher unwahrscheinlich, es sei denn jemand habe eine chemische oder physikalische Erklärung dafür. Der sehr gemütliche Zerfall des Thorium kann es ja wohl nicht bewirken.

 

Nun, Bruder Stefan, vielleicht waren diese frühen Summicrone auch schon immer so gelblich im Glas. Da ich zur Zeit der Enstehung dieser Objektive noch nicht auf dieser Welt weilte, kann ich diesbezüglich keine Erfahrungen aus erster Hand beitragen. Jedenfalls sind spätere Summicrone nicht so gelblich im Glas, das kann natürlich an einer anderen Glassorte liegen und muß auch nicht zwangsläufig bedeuten, dass das ältere Glas radioaktiv war und das neuere nicht.

 

Grüße,

 

Andreas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Ja, Bruder Andreas, das mag sein, daß einige immer so gelblich waren, mein

frühes ist es nicht richtig, ein wieder verkauftes war es.

 

Freundelichst

Br. Stefan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liebe Miterkrankten,

 

an anderer Stelle wird gerne einmal die Verwendung des Kodak Aero Ektar Luftbildobjektives an Grossformatkameras disskutiert.

Die hohe Lichtstärke von 2,5 wirkt in der der Welt der düsteren Mattscheiben sehr anziehend... Auch dieses Objektiv ist mit thoriumhaltigen Gläsern bestückt und neigt zu gelb-bräunlichen Verfärbungen. In diesem Link wird u.a. eine Theorie dazu aufgestellt.

 

Aero-Ektar Lenses

 

Ob diese dem Leica-Historica-Peer-Review-Board standhält wird sich zeigen;

mir, mit meinen bescheidenen physikalischen Grundkenntnissen, erscheint sie wenigstens nicht unplausibel.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüssen

 

Sebastian Brandt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Vielen Dank für den Hinweis. Die Frage nach der Verfärbung wird durch den Hinweis

auf Radioaktivität zwar behauptet, aber nicht plausibel gemacht, wenn ich es recht

verstanden habe.

 

Freundlichst

str.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Das Thema Gelbverfärbung von thoriumhaltigen Gläsern ist auch Pentax- und Canon-Besitzern bei ganz bestimmten Objektiven bekannt. Die genaue Ursache kenne ich auch nicht, jedoch scheint längere direkte Sonnenbestrahlung bei offener Blende, wenn möglich mit in Alufolie eingewickelter Fassung (damit keine Schmierstoffe unter Hitzeinwirkung austrocknen) die Gelbverfärbung rückgängig zu machen oder wesentlich zu verringern. Auch UV-Bestrahlung soll helfen.

 

Gruß, Frank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also mit dem Beitrag über Aero-Ektar Objektive kann man wenig anfangen.

Das einzige, was der gute Mann erkennen läßt, ist daß er Gammaspektroskopiker ist und deshalb wohl mit einem Impulshöhenanalysator umgehen kann. Dann hat er Thorium festgestellt, was nicht verwunderlich ist, denn vor den Lanthanidenzumischungen in den Gläsern hat man Thoriumoxid wegen seiner sehr hohen Brechzahl verwendet.

Er sagt nun überhaupt nichts quantitativ aus über die Intensität der Strahlung, ich wage aber zu postulieren, daß sie nachweisbar, aber nicht von Bedeutung ist, was er ja indirekt auch schreibt. Die Gefährdung der Soldaten, um den Krieg zu gewinnen sei höher als die Gefährdung durch Ektare ist ja äußerst präzise.

 

Nochmals: Die Alpha-Strahlung des Thorium 232 kann man getrost ignorieren. Die Gammastrahlung der angeregten Zerfallsprodukte auch - bei der extrem langen Halbwertszeit des Thorium kommt da bei den geringen Mengen in den Gläsern wohl wenig rüber. Die Energie der Gammastrahlen liegt im Gegensatz zu der der Alphastrahlen (MeV) im keV-Bereich. Sie wird noch nicht mal Filme beeinträchtigen, denn der Wirkungsquerschnitt in AgX für Gammastrahlen ist niedrig, d.h. es findet wenig Absorption statt und gebildete Silberkeime zerfallen wieder ehe ein stabiler, entwickelbarer Keim entsteht. Da müßte schon eine Szintillationsschicht am Film angebracht sein.

Also Strahlung: am besten vergessen.

Bleibt die Verfärbung: Ich weiß es nicht, tendiere aber eher zu der Meinung, daß die Glasmatrix mit der Beimengung des Thoriumoxid sich rein chemisch derart verändert, daß die Lichtabsorption sich im gleichen Maße ändert. Wie Frank schreibt, könnte es ja ein reversibler Vorgang sein, der schon von Energien im Bereich der Lichtenergie verursacht wird und das spricht eher nicht für Strahlenschäden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Leicas Freund
, könnte es ja ein reversibler Vorgang sein, .

Daß Du ein guter Physiker bist - das glaube ich.

Doch warum dieses rumwerfen mit banalen Fremdworten - die nicht banalen sind für mich als Unkundigen schon Hindernis genug, um Dich zu verstehen.

Du bist doch ein netter Mensch - nimm bitte Rücksicht auf die Unmenschen, die "nicht Humanisten".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Leicas Freund, gern würde ich fragen, welches der Fremdwörter nicht sofort

per google gefunden werden kann, wie man Alphastrahlung übersetzen soll,

was es hilft, wenn das Wort «Halbwertszeit» auf gut Deutsch dasteht und

man es doch nicht ohne Kenntnisse deuten kann, und warum wir blumige

Umschreibungen lesen sollen, wenn es klar und eindeutig geht? Physik

wenigsten ist nicht Lyrik.

 

Nichts für ungut

str.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Leicas Freund
Leicas Freund, gern würde ich fragen, welches der Fremdwörter nicht sofort per google gefunden werden kann, wie man Alphastrahlung übersetzen soll, was es hilft, wenn das Wort «Halbwertszeit» auf gut Deutsch dasteht und

man es doch nicht ohne Kenntnisse deuten kann, und warum wir blumige Umschreibungen lesen sollen, wenn es klar und eindeutig geht? Physik wenigsten ist nicht Lyrik.

Du magst Dich zu Fragen der Sprache mit google orientieren - jeder so wie er es für sinnvoll erachtet. Für Lyrik mag es angehen, für Pysik halte ich dieses Verfahren für ungeeignet.

 

Grundsätzlich ist ein zusammenklauben von Begriffen für das Verständnis eines fachlich orientierten Textes wenig förderlich.

Der Zusammenhang geht für den fachlich nicht versierten Leser verloren.

Außerdem gewinnen Begriffe zumeist im Zusammenhang von Theorien (die man kennen müßte) ihre Bedeutung.

 

Zudem - es gibt für das von mir genannten Zitat

" reversibler Vorgang "

wohl eine auch einem Nicht-Phsiker verständliche Formulierung. Dazu würde dann vermutlich auch eine kurze eingeschobene Erläuterung gehören.

Eine eindeutige Übersetzung dieser Formulierung ist mit meinen einfachen Sprachlexikönnern nicht möglich(eines für Physiker habe ich nicht) - und so bin ich auf Vermutung angewiesen, wo doch Klarheit schön wäre.

Wie sähe denn so ein "Reversibler Vorgang" aus?

Beide Möglichkeiten der sinnvollen Übersetzung sind mit normalem gesunden menschlichen Verstand nicht auszuschließen.

- beide würde ich aber als physikalische Vorgänge gern unterschieden sehen. Wie sähe denn so ein "Reversibler Vorgang aus?

von wegen die Genauigkeit und so..

LG

LF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue., Read more about our Privacy Policy