Jump to content

One shot one kill?


cheewai_m6
 Share

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Hi, I'm not sure if this has been discussed, but I've been around this forums for years and I've never seen a thread dedicated to this subject.

 

When you shoot film, are you in a 'one shot one kill' frame of mind? You really want to make that 1 shot be exactly what you want for that shot. In digital there's that lattitude of missing it and taking another 10 and you'll hit the shot out of elimination. Not everyone shoots that way in digital, and I don't, but I used to.

 

With film, obviously you got 36 in a roll, but not only because of the cost, but just because each exposure is like precious resource you don't want to waste. So you want that shot to be right. Personally, I tend be in the mentality to dedicate 1 exposure to 1 shot I want. Obviously if I know I missed it or got it wrong, I'll take another one. As a frame of mind though, I'm one shot one kill (so to speak).

 

There are times of course where digital has advantages and shooting a lot to catch that 1 shot is fine. But I don't make a living out of photography so there isn't pressure on me.

 

Are you in a similar state of mind when shooting film? Or do you just let yourself go and not even think about it?

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not about using film... or digital.

 

It's about using a rangefinder vs slr.

 

With my SLR's (film and digital) i know EXACTLY what my framing is. ZERO guessing, what i see is what i get.

 

With a rangefinder... not so (at least not as much).

 

So to answer your question, i make every picture count with my SLR. With my rangefinder i might take 2-3 picture to make sure i get the critical shot i want.

 

Edit: To add, i was taught to do as little post-processing. Get everything right IN camera (film/digital), and leave the post-processing for minute adjustments (colors/etc but not framing... especially not framing).

Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it feels like going through a yellow traffic light. Once I commit I shoot. But, I I do put thought into it before I ever load the film. Sleepless nights have led to endless possibilities for different projects. I really should place a composition book and pen in the nightstand.

 

I am not a machine gunner and I don't shoot sports. I like to really focus on the light, the subject, the composition and then quickly figure where to place the camera, what exposure based on film loaded etc ... It's very relaxing and exciting if that makes sense.

 

I think digital (personally) makes me lazy.

 

I'd be interested in reading about what other film users thinking process is on this topic. I find it interesting. Thanks for the topic!

Edited by SiMPLiFY
left out a word. oops!
Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the 1960s in college much of photography classes was about becoming proficient enough in taking the picture that post-processing was minimized. Darkroom work helped in that process as each time you printed you also saw how you could have done better. Our "final exam" was a photo assignment with a single 12-exposure roll of slide film to tell a story. You projected all 12 shots to the class (in whatever order you wanted) for critique.

That thinking still affects me, as I find a 36 exposure roll adequate for a day's outing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the 1960s in college much of photography classes was about becoming proficient enough in taking the picture that post-processing was minimized. Darkroom work helped in that process as each time you printed you also saw how you could have done better. Our "final exam" was a photo assignment with a single 12-exposure roll of slide film to tell a story. You projected all 12 shots to the class (in whatever order you wanted) for critique.

That thinking still affects me, as I find a 36 exposure roll adequate for a day's outing.

 

I tried getting a BA in photography.

 

They only take 25 students per year.

 

 

The classes aren't even offered for a minor or for general credits.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

... Our "final exam" was a photo assignment with a single 12-exposure roll of slide film to tell a story. You projected all 12 shots to the class (in whatever order you wanted) for critique.

That thinking still affects me, as I find a 36 exposure roll adequate for a day's outing.

 

This is almost exactly what I plan to do at a local event called street scenes coming up soon. I need to recondition my brain ... It's a great exercise and discipline. I will however be using a Leica M2 and a 36 exposure roll of TRi-X! Is that cheating?

:D

 

Anybody want to play? I have no idea how to get my film shots on a computer so ... I need to work on that if I want to ever participate ...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

ps. I am not buying an expensive scanner but am trying to find a way to shoot my negatives with a digital camera using the film holder of my Epson 2400 without a ton of time or effort!

 

If I figure it out I dare any one of you to fulfill this exam by the end of August!

Link to post
Share on other sites

ps. I am not buying an expensive scanner but am trying to find a way to shoot my negatives with a digital camera using the film holder of my Epson 2400 without a ton of time or effort!

 

If I figure it out I dare any one of you to fulfill this exam by the end of August!

 

You can buy a 35mm negative holder for DSLR's. It attaches to the front of the lens, put a negative in it, aim at a clean light source, take the pic and voila. Post-processing is done with Photoshop i believe.

 

Personally i would invest in a good scanner. Whats the point shooting Leica + good/great glass and cheap out on the scanning part...

 

Might as well shoot with a P&S

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Everybody,

 

Interestingly not that long ago 1 of the reasons 35mm was considered to be a good choice was because the 36 exposure cartridge allowed people the freedom to experiment w/ various exposures & techniques by taking a lot of pictures easily & inexpensively. Something which would have been much more difficult to do w/ the then popular single exposure sheet films & 120 roll film.

 

If you look @ hunters in the field whether they are a lion, hawk or person you will find they generally pick 1 subject & concentrate on that. There are very few differences between photography & hunting.

 

Best Regards,

 

Michael

Link to post
Share on other sites

]

If you look @ hunters in the field whether they are a lion, hawk or person you will find they generally pick 1 subject & concentrate on that. There are very few differences between photography & huntingl

 

Haven't killed anyone I shot with a camera yet. Nor have come home with 36 carcases in various degree of wounded. Not even during war.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is almost exactly what I plan to do at a local event called street scenes coming up soon. I need to recondition my brain ... It's a great exercise and discipline. I will however be using a Leica M2 and a 36 exposure roll of TRi-X! Is that cheating? :D

 

Anybody want to play? I have no idea how to get my film shots on a computer so ... I need to work on that if I want to ever participate ...

 

You should look into Forum's "One Challenge" that will be held again in October.

 

We meet in a particular city (this year it's Palermo) and we have to use one body, one film (or 36 digital shots), one lens and then have two hours to shoot these frames, from which we choose the one best shot which is then judged by anyone interested on the forum against everyone else's one shot.

 

It's not easy, especially in a strange city when you are trying to capture a shot that sums up that city.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to shoot just once - even with digital. But sometimes I do two or three - if I'm for example taking a picture of a person and he/she blinks right when I take the shot I usually take another one. That's easier to see with a rangefinder, although the only slr I use is digital so I can chimp.

 

And if I'm in very low light and have to use long exposures hand-held I usually do a couple and hope at least one of them is sharp.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I'm not sure if this has been discussed, but I've been around this forums for years and I've never seen a thread dedicated to this subject.

 

When you shoot film, are you in a 'one shot one kill' frame of mind? You really want to make that 1 shot be exactly what you want for that shot. In digital there's that lattitude of missing it and taking another 10 and you'll hit the shot out of elimination. Not everyone shoots that way in digital, and I don't, but I used to.

 

With film, obviously you got 36 in a roll, but not only because of the cost, but just because each exposure is like precious resource you don't want to waste. So you want that shot to be right. Personally, I tend be in the mentality to dedicate 1 exposure to 1 shot I want. Obviously if I know I missed it or got it wrong, I'll take another one. As a frame of mind though, I'm one shot one kill (so to speak).

 

There are times of course where digital has advantages and shooting a lot to catch that 1 shot is fine. But I don't make a living out of photography so there isn't pressure on me.

 

Are you in a similar state of mind when shooting film? Or do you just let yourself go and not even think about it?

 

Yes. I try to at least. I want to shoot one shot to get what I want, because I'll never be able to replicate that exact moment. Sometimes, few times, I bracket, that is the only time where I shoot more than one exposure for each "scene/moment". And it does affect my work. I can say I am a lot more comfortable behind a film camera than a digital camera, and that comfort translates through my work, where a lot of people have said that my film shots are WAY better than my digital shots, both in terms of quality, exposure, composition, and quantity. It does make a difference. When you have only 36 shots to capture ten good pictures as opposed to 4000 shots (low quality, small JPEG 16 megapixel dSLR). Anyone who asks me how to get seriously into photography, a lot of people ask me actually now that I think about it, I always tell them if they're serious about it, that they should start learning the basics of composition and exposure with film first, and then move to digital if they want.

 

At that point a lot of people get hesitant and ignore my advice. The point being, one shot one kill because an important skill, especially for street photography. In the studio, you have a lot of leeway, as you have time to shoot your models, a lot more time than on the street, where you have to chase the scene.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You should look into Forum's "One Challenge" that will be held again in October.

 

We meet in a particular city (this year it's Palermo) and we have to use one body, one film (or 36 digital shots), one lens and then have two hours to shoot these frames, from which we choose the one best shot which is then judged by anyone interested on the forum against everyone else's one shot.

 

It's not easy, especially in a strange city when you are trying to capture a shot that sums up that city.

 

That sounds very interesting and challenging!

Link to post
Share on other sites

One 'kill' as it seems to be called, is all that matters. Every situation is different. I'm constantly discovering new ones. Do what is necessary to get what you want. Don't count the shots, count the result.

 

Last night I shot a stage production rehearsal. There was no stopping. I shot 350 images in two hours, with an expectation of about half that. That's what the client expected. I came away with in excess of 300 useable 'kills'.

 

Earlier today, I went out to shoot precisely 12 nominated images. I came back with 12 images, spread over one roll of 12 exposure film. All 'perfect'.

 

Two shooting methods, both adapted to the need. Locking into a fixed technique is doomed to fall short all or most of the time. A photographer must always be adaptable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to make every shot count, much like everyone else. At the same time, I don't pressure myself in to "one shot one kill" I just care about the art I am trying to make.

 

It's a fun idea though

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...