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Pentax O-ICK1 sensor cleaning kit

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Hi

I was wondering if someone used the PENTAX O-ICK1 cleaning kit on M9 and with what result.

Any advice on how to use it properly?

Thanks

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Is that the stick with a squidgy tip and sticky cleaning pads? If so, I've tried it on my M8 but haven't quite got the hang of it yet. I get the impression that it's good at picking up debris (especially if you can use a dissecting microscope or similar to see what you're doing) but useless with grease spots and other crud that is stuck to the sensor.

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Thanks

I use Artic Butterfly and it seams that is just moving the dust from one place to another.

Every time I check the spots shows up in a different part than before.

I was hoping to grab them out.

I was watching the Leica video with the lady using the orange lolipop.

The sound of pulling out the stick was preaty scary.

Is that sticky? How much pressure should one apply?

I don't want to pull out the glass of the sensor

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The Green Clean vacuum cleaner should be just your thing.

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I used a different version of the "sticky lollipop" - and found that it left some square residue outlines itself. Not permanent - easily removed with a wet cleaning. But kinda pointless if you have to clean again after each cleaning.

 

My Arctic Butterfly is also beginning to leave streaks of a greasy nature - not sure how to clean it itself. So I'm veering away from "reusable" cleaning tools to one-time-use materials: dry cotton-tipped swabs, air puffers, and as a last resort for the really sticky stuff, wet-cleaning swabs.

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Andy the replacement model brushes come with a pre-moistened swab for a first pre-use wipe. With that one they then they suggest a PEC pad and Eclipse fluid.

 

It's inevitable that the brushes will pick up some residue from touching the chamber. Just like brushes used to clean lenses/filters start leaving streaks, sometimes from skin oils.

I feel safer with brush and wet clean as needed than with anything sticky. We've had rare reports of problems as you know and the sensor cover glass is thin of course.

Edited by hoppyman

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I used a different version of the "sticky lollipop" - and found that it left some square residue outlines itself. Not permanent - easily removed with a wet cleaning. But kinda pointless if you have to clean again after each cleaning.

 

My Arctic Butterfly is also beginning to leave streaks of a greasy nature - not sure how to clean it itself. So I'm veering away from "reusable" cleaning tools to one-time-use materials: dry cotton-tipped swabs, air puffers, and as a last resort for the really sticky stuff, wet-cleaning swabs.

 

My arctic butterfly also started leaving streaks and I ended up abandoning it in favor of wet cleaning w/ swabs.

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Thanks guys

I solved the problem

I pulled out the sensor, washed with warm water, rinsed in vodka and at the end I've used a bit of sandpaper the make the sensor shiny.

Now the pictures are fine

A bit of noise maybe

You know what. I can wait. Let the dust collect. I should be busy taking pics then wooing about the sensor.

I'm wondering if Henry Cartier Bresson would have had a digital camera how many wonderful pics would have left behind. In era of technology we spilt the pixels in half use zoom on monitors like crazy but pictures...?

Let't shoot the crap out of this fine machines and flood this forum with cool pics.

When I was shooting my MP I wasn't worried about all thees issues and sensors and I have nice pictures.

At the end of the day I wouldn't even see the dust speck on a 5x7 print.

Maybe I would clean it after 1 year. Same as the engine oil.

Have fun guys and lets post Leica pictures.

Thanks a lot

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dust is a pain: recently I did some very large prints (more than a meter long). Even though I de-spotted them in LR dust spots were visible in dark areas of the image when printed at that size. It would have been extremely difficult to remove those spots as they are almost invisible on a monitor.

 

I am trying to do like Thorsten: and shoot wide open more often.

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My arctic butterfly also started leaving streaks and I ended up abandoning it in favor of wet cleaning w/ swabs.

 

My arctic butterfly started leaving streaks when I tried cleaning spots which were 'oil on sensor' problems on my M8 (before that problem was widely known). However, VD do supply brush cleaning tablets specifically for the purpose of removing contaminents from the brush fibres, and the tablets worked fine on my brush.

 

That said, I don't use the AB much. I don't seem to get much dust on the M9 sensor and I don't stress about it unless there is an obvious, annoying and persistent spot visible at wider apertures.

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I tried the Pentax lollipop, scratched the IR filter and had to get the sensor assembly replaced. I expect an abrasive particle embedded in the lollipop, didn't come off when cleaning it on the cleaning paper, then scratched the filter during the next application.

 

If you've got filtered compressed air and some clean soft brushes, you can use your swipes to move the dust from the edges to the centre of the filter. Blowing the brush with compressed air gives it electrostatic charge which attracts the dust away from the filter onto the bristles. Make sure to clean the brush with compressed air after each application.

 

Its also a good idea to clean the mount and chamber with a "charged" brush before starting on the filter, otherwise you'll be back to where you started. The sensor gets charged when in use so dust tends to migrate to (and stay on) the IR filter.

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That is very usefull info.

Thank you. Good to know

I'm woried of using the same brush on the chamber and on sensor after that.

Isn't possible of getting oil from rangefinder couple system onto the brush and pass it to sensor?

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Isn't possible of getting oil from rangefinder couple system onto the brush and pass it to sensor?

 

You really need separate brushes for cleaning each area (mount, chamber and sensor). I'd be inclined to leaving the rangefinder coupling alone but if its contaminated there are probably better ways to clean it than with a brush.

 

Once you're done petrol is very effective for cleaning the brushes (providing the bristles are not synthetic). You're right to be concerned about ensuring the brushes are clean and dry, particularly when using them on the IR filter.

 

As for Cartier-Bresson each exposure he took was on a brand new sensor =).

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I strongly suggest that you do not use petrol on anything that may come into contact with your sensor assembly

Antistatic brushes such as the Arctic Butterfly are certainly made from synthetic fibres too.

 

Don't take my word for it... ask Leica Camera!

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I use the Pentax O-ICK1, the orange sticky rubber thing on the end of a stick, which comes with special paper that pulls the dust off the sticky orange part.

 

This is the same tool that Leica use at the factory to clean the M9 sensor. It works very well on all but the most stubborn spots. I use the following:

Rocket blower

-if that doesn't work-

Arctic butterfly brush

-if that doesn't work-

Pentax O-ICK1

-if that doesn't work-

Wet clean with eclipse E2, spatula and pec-pad.

 

If I have to do a wet clean, I will follow it up with the O-ICK1 again anyway.

I never have problems with residue or anything, but then I have been cleaning my own sensors for a long time.

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there are probably better ways to clean it than with a brush.

 

Isopropyl alcohol 99% and a cotton tip for cleaning the cam roller. If there is tons of scum and it requires cleaning of the arm etc, send it to a technician.

 

You can also use isopropyl alcohol to clean synthetic brushes.

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