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Monitor Profiling in Mac OS X 10.7/Lion


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I have been using an X-Rite Eye One Display LT colorimeter and the Eye One Match software it came with, and was disappointed when cleaning out and replacing PowerPC apps from my system that it was one of them. As you may know, when Lion comes it will not have Rosetta support for PPC apps. Courtesy of Macintouch I came across a recommendation for an open source alternative that is a Universal app. It is based on the Argyll CMS binaries and you need to download both these binaries and the dispcalGUI app that lets you use them without some heavy use of Terminal. The Argyll CMS binaries can be downloaded here (make sure you pick the Intel version if you are in the same situation as me, not the PPC version):

Download Argyll OSX 10.3 executables

 

and dispcalGUI is here:

dispcalGUI—Open Source Display Calibration and Characterization powered by Argyll CMS

 

The second link has a list of supported colorimeters and spectrometers. I simply put the unzipped folder of binaries in the folder with the GUI app in it (you have to navigate to the binaries the first time you start up). I'm running 10.6.7 at present and it works fine. It isn't the simplest nor the most intuitive application, but its free and it works rather nicely. If you choose "Calibrate and Profile" it is done in less than 10 minutes, and the only input after selecting setting like white point and so on before pushing the button is when a console window half hidden behind the patch of changing color swathes requires a numerical input to proceed to finishing the calibration ("7" tells it to carry on). I think it's worth the experiment as the commercial alternatives are expensive and it seems like a shame to have to waste the instrument you have already bought. I'm not associated in any way with the software, other than as a rather pleased user who has just avoided having to buy another calibration/profiling system.

 

Chris

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nggalai

This is not unusual. Apple has a long track record of fundamental changes the way ColorSync (the OS X color management module) works with different releases. Profiling companies such as basICColor and XRite often need loads of additional testing apart from using beta releases of the operating system until they “get it right”. In the case of Snow Leopard and basICColor, it took (a few) weeks after release until a 10.6 compatible version of its Display 4 software was openly available. And it took

chrism

I have been using an X-Rite Eye One Display LT colorimeter and the Eye One Match software it came with, and was disappointed when cleaning out and replacing PowerPC apps from my system that it was one of them. As you may know, when Lion comes it will not have Rosetta support for PPC apps. Courtesy of Macintouch I came across a recommendation for an open source alternative that is a Universal app. It is based on the Argyll CMS binaries and you need to download both these binaries and the dispcalG

rob_w

Hi Beyder,   Calibrating your screen is a really good idea as no screens I have ever seen come properly calibrated from the factory -- they all have a strong blue cast. If you adjust your photos without calibration they will look wrong on a calibrated monitor and when you print them.   To calibrate the screen you buy a kit which consists of a hardware device which reads a series of colour patches off the screen and reports the results to calibration software which then builds a profile.

Hi Chris,

 

Argyll works really well with many colorimeters out there, so others in a similar situation might find your posting useful. Thanks for sharing.

 

Regarding i1 Match: X-Rite is one of the prime suppliers of colour management solutions and i1 Match is modular software. Its core also drives their spectrometer (i1 Pro), still regarded as the most affordable professional solution for proofing and printer calibration. So I would be very surprised should X-Rite not be working on an Intel / Universal Binary version of i1 Match.

 

Cheerio,

-Sascha

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Hmm. Good to know. But even that is specified to work up to OS X 10.6--no mention of 10.7.

 

This is not unusual. Apple has a long track record of fundamental changes the way ColorSync (the OS X color management module) works with different releases. Profiling companies such as basICColor and XRite often need loads of additional testing apart from using beta releases of the operating system until they “get it right”. In the case of Snow Leopard and basICColor, it took (a few) weeks after release until a 10.6 compatible version of its Display 4 software was openly available. And it took another iteration until it really worked as expected inside the QA margins customers expected. Same with Quato’s iColor (which uses the same code base as basICColor); XRite was a tad faster, but full Snow Leopard compatibility wasn’t publically available at launch.

 

I don’t know what Apple might have changed or has changed with 10.7, if anything, but after the 10.6 upgrade mini-fiasco I’m not too surprised should the color management providers hold their horses and wait for the Gold Master until publically stating full compatibility. Even if their software might work just fine right now.

 

Cheers,

-Sascha

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Chris, thanks very much for posting this. I downloaded the apps and installed them (your instructions were very clear) and everything operates as it should.

 

The only problem is the results are not quite right. The overall colour balance is good but the whites are not truly white but ever so slightly cream coloured. I wonder if this is to do with not having the right setting for white temperature and white point -- any thoughts?

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Hey guys,

 

I have been procrastinating about calibrating my monitor and now feel it is time to actually DO IT. I am using an iMac (Intel Core 2 Dou) running OSX Lion 10.7. Can someone recommend what would be the best route for me to do this. I have no knowledge in this field. I read about you guys talking about two different software applications that are necessary and don't have a clue why. Can someone help?

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Ok, here is a real low tech work around until X-Rite up-dates my software for my hardware. I bought a new MacAir and it has Lion installed. So, I just moved the monitor profile file over from my old MacAir to the new one. It is pretty close and a lot better than what came with the new MacAir. And, this is not my primary computer for editing.

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Hey guys,

 

I have been procrastinating about calibrating my monitor and now feel it is time to actually DO IT. I am using an iMac (Intel Core 2 Dou) running OSX Lion 10.7. Can someone recommend what would be the best route for me to do this. I have no knowledge in this field. I read about you guys talking about two different software applications that are necessary and don't have a clue why. Can someone help?

 

Hi Beyder,

 

Calibrating your screen is a really good idea as no screens I have ever seen come properly calibrated from the factory -- they all have a strong blue cast. If you adjust your photos without calibration they will look wrong on a calibrated monitor and when you print them.

 

To calibrate the screen you buy a kit which consists of a hardware device which reads a series of colour patches off the screen and reports the results to calibration software which then builds a profile. The profile is stored on the computer and loads each time the computer is started up. Pretty simple, really.

 

Typical devices come from X-Rite and Colorvision. This thread is about the fact that the software used by the device has not been updated for Lion. Most of us are unwilling to shell out for a new device simply because a relatively simple software upgrade is required. Just check that anything you buy is compatible with Lion before you hand over your money.

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Hi Beyder,

 

Calibrating your screen is a really good idea as no screens I have ever seen come properly calibrated from the factory -- they all have a strong blue cast. If you adjust your photos without calibration they will look wrong on a calibrated monitor and when you print them.

 

To calibrate the screen you buy a kit which consists of a hardware device which reads a series of colour patches off the screen and reports the results to calibration software which then builds a profile. The profile is stored on the computer and loads each time the computer is started up. Pretty simple, really.

 

Typical devices come from X-Rite and Colorvision. This thread is about the fact that the software used by the device has not been updated for Lion. Most of us are unwilling to shell out for a new device simply because a relatively simple software upgrade is required. Just check that anything you buy is compatible with Lion before you hand over your money.

 

Thank you so much for clarifying. But my main question is what would be recommended for my iMac running Lion if I go with X-Rite? Do I also need another program alongside that?

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For those using Datacolor Spyders, there is a Lion update here: Support - Datacolor - Global Leader in Color Management Solutions Datacolor admit it is a bit of a temporary "bodge", makes profiles for one user only and does not correct for lighting levels at the moment. I thought my iMac screen was looking strange and realised it was not using the profiles I had made in SL.

 

Wilson

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My old Monaco Optix is no longer supported by X-rite so I am considering the colormunki display, which works on Lion.

 

Jeff

 

I downloaded the software mentioned in the original post, I downloaded the dmg file for dispcalGUI and the executables which I unzipped using archive app.

 

I plugged in my old Monaco Optix XR and started up dispalGUI, (directed it towards the location of the executables) which recognised it as DTP94 and ran a profile for my i-mac, and when prompted installed it. Seems to work fine and be very similar to the original Apple supplied i-mac profile.

 

Early days but it might have saved me a wasted colorimeter and some cash.

 

Jeff

 

PS I'm running Snow Leopard 10.6.8

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The original Monaco Optix software which is Power PC, should run in Snow Leopard anyway through the Rosetta emulator. From memory, Rosetta was not installed as standard on Snow Leopard (unlike Leopard) but was a free download from Apple. I now have a screed of useless programs which will not run in Lion, the most important of which is Acrobat 7 Pro, which I used to use all the time.

 

Wilson

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Trouble is Wilson I lost my CD that came with the Monaco Optix. I often wonder that when people claim lost CD they have some sort of pirate copy but in my case it is true I've hunted high and low for it!

 

Anyway this dispCAL works fine and is ready for Lion.

 

I understand that companies cant support hardware for ever but my Optix is like new and it would seem such a shame to throw it away. All these software changes they are a game aren't they, they almost always cost the consumer either cash or hassle.

 

Jeff

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Jeff,

 

I have PM'd you about the CRT sucker for the Monaco Optix. If it is of any use, when I get back to the UK, I can run off a copy of the original Monaco software for you, but you would need to reacquire a serial number, which now may be difficult. It sounds as you are sorted anyway with the Argyll software. I will look at this as well, since I feel the Monaco profiles were more to my taste than the Spyder ones, which look a touch too green to my eyes.

 

Wilson

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