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due163

why do so many M8 users shoot......

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In black and white? I see a lot of m8 shots that are black and white , especially on flickr

 

is it a deficiency of the camera at a higher ISO (film like grain?) , or is it because the tonal range really suits the black and white format?

 

thanks

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Or, if you don't use a IR cut filter color can be awful. :(I only started enjoying shooting color with the M8 after getting my UV/IR cut filter.

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As an objective historical fact most significant photography was and for the most part still is black and white. One could discuss or even argue the nuances of B&W film vs. digital, wet darkroom vs.inkjet etc.--and this is absolutely not the same discussion that would apply to color. The fact is the best way to see or present many images is in B&W. It goes without saying there is a noble and venerable guild of Leica M photographers that have elegantly done this over many decades.

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As an objective historical fact most significant photography was and for the most part still is black and white. ....

You're going to need to back that statement up please (since you say it's "an objective historical fact").

And what do you class as "significant"?

 

Pete.

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The thinner IR cut filter over the M8 sensor is said to make it "better" for B+W than cameras with a thicker filter, including the M9. I have not tested this.

 

A B+W image strips out the complications/ enhancements of colour and is more graphic. The image works of fails by this "drawing with light" (the origins of the word photography).

 

That's all.

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Re: My comments regarding the statement that historically most significant photography was and for the most part still is B&W. I would state that collectibility based on values either in galleries or at auction overwhelmingly illustrates this. The "art photography" market is inarguably and predominantly B&W. A survey of gallery inventories and prices as well as auction results clearly supports this.In many galleries it is uncommon to see any color work at all. One could also use either presently available or out of print photography books which again are overwhelmingly B&W. If one were to compile a list of the worlds greatest photographers, both past and present, it would be dominated by those whose body of work was or is predominantly B&W. Is there great color work being done?---absolutely. but for the most part the marketplace does not value it to the degree it does significant B&W.

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Re: My comments regarding the statement that historically most significant photography was and for the most part still is B&W. I would state that collectibility based on values either in galleries or at auction overwhelmingly illustrates this. The "art photography" market is inarguably and predominantly B&W. A survey of gallery inventories and prices as well as auction results clearly supports this.In many galleries it is uncommon to see any color work at all. One could also use either presently available or out of print photography books which again are overwhelmingly B&W. If one were to compile a list of the worlds greatest photographers, both past and present, it would be dominated by those whose body of work was or is predominantly B&W. Is there great color work being done?---absolutely. but for the most part the marketplace does not value it to the degree it does significant B&W.

 

That's an awfully bold statement. Not sure if I agree with this. It's hard to take out the fact that B&W was so dominant for so long - simply because it was the only option. It got a huge head start on color - allowing it years of opportunity to capture significant moments in a way that had never been done before.

 

Still, I do love B&W. 90 percent or more of my digital shots are processed as B&W.

The m8 produces beautiful colors. Though, I do think B&W performance is more acceptable at higher ISO. I guess I'm just conditioned to think it's ok to have grain/noise in a B&W image - but not a color image.

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I've only just started using the M8, and I really like the B/W images it produces. The colour images are alright too, but the B/W is, to me at least, far more interesting to look at than the B/W shots I got on my previous cameras. I haven't got an IR filter on mine, but if that's going to improve the B/W even further I might have to get hold of one (not to mention solving the purple issue)

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Re: My comments regarding the statement that historically most significant photography was and for the most part still is B&W. I would state that collectibility based on values either in galleries or at auction overwhelmingly illustrates this. ...etc.

Regrettably this boils down to your opinion. This is not the "objective historical fact" that you would like it to be.

 

Pete.

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I'm not sure why you think it is just my opinion. Just off the top of my head I can't think of a group of color photographers who are as well regarded or whose work remotely brings the critical acclaim and prices of the likes of Adams, Atget, Weston(s),HCB, Kertez, Strand, Frank, Erwitt, P. Caponigro, Sexton, Eisenstadt, Callahan,White, Gilpin(s) Sommer, Tice, Smith, Bravo etc. Admittedly some of these photographers careers preceded the option to do color work, and some certainly had the option to work in color and in fact did so. At least in every instance that I am aware of it is their B&W work that is enduring and continues to be appreciated, collected and appreciate in value. This is fact and not opinion.

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Thanks for the replies people, Im just doing some extra research before dropping the cash

 

:confused:Why should an artistic preference of a group of users influence a buying decision?

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That must be it...

 

To come back to the original post, I think it may well be that photographers that are attracted to the rangefinder styly of photography are the type of photographers that are attracted to monochrome images. Having said that I have noticed a strong resurgence of black and white photography in general in the last few years.

Edited by jaapv

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Yes - when the M8 came out, one reviewer used the phrase "Leicachrome" I think it is the the Kodak sensor that does the trick. They know a thing or two about color in Rochester...

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