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Highest iso you regularly use with M8?

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Almost no one using 2500? I use it quite a lot when fotographing people inside. I always shoot raw.

 

Rather than trying to beat sensor noise, I turn off noise reduction in Capture one, convert to B&W and enjoy grainy photos.

 

This way you can get M8 photo's to approximate push TRI-X.

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RotarySMP: You've replied to a very old thread. That said, I generally accept 160/320 for most shooting, with 640 in specific situations. I'd rather underexpose and push in post than accept the noise at above 640. In the rare cases a final photo won't ever need to be larger than 800x600, I can accept the noise at 1250. I don't use 2500 at all. Other people (in other threads) have used 2500 and 1250 on a regular basis. Most M8 shooters that have posted in the forum over the years consider the noise at 640 a bit much. Cheers! Will

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Sorry to wake a dead thread

 

I only got my M8 six weeks ago, so it is new to me. I agree with 640 being about a limit for decent color photos.

 

I'll have to try underexposing 640 and pushing the raw files in comparison. Thanks for the tip.

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RotarySMP,

 

Welcome to the forum and congratulations on your 'new' M8!

 

One thing that has changed regarding noise since the M8's release is how LightRoom handles noise, which is reputed to offer at least another stop in ISO; ie noise at ISO 1250 is similar to noise formerly at ISO 640 etc.

 

Pete.

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...I agree with 640 being about a limit for decent color photos...

Depends if grain/noise makes part of your photography. Here M8.2 at 2500 iso (8 MB file). Otherwise 640 iso is perfectly acceptable and 1250 is significantly noisy but is still usable with good raw converters like C1.

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I use up to 1250 and agree with the film grain approach, yes it is grainy, sometimes if you drop an EV in Lightroom the grain will reduce slightly.

 

It's filmic and not as digital with noise as other camera. I quite like it

 

A couple at night with my 28 Summicron at F2, the smaller the image the less grainy it appears. I never use LR noise reduction as it always makes images look less filmic, loses detail and can make faces and skin tones look a little plastic. Its interesting I thought it was amazing on my GF1, I guess the grain on that camera was more offensive.

Edited by IWC Doppel

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I try to use 160 outdoors for bright days, then drop to 320 for cloudy and bright indoor work.

 

For most indoors I use 640 and once in a while I drop to 1250 or 2500 if I want to do B+W conversions

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Personally, I would use any ISO in order to get an image with the desired look (including the factors such as shutter speed and depth of field). I've always lived by the philosophy that it is better to have a grainy image rather than one that has insufficient depth of field or too slow a shutter speed, hence resulting in unacceptable motion blur/ camera shake.

 

The fantastic part about modern Leica lenses is their excellent quality straight from wide open. With a 28mm lens at wide open on the M8 (for the commonly-used field of view of close to a 35mm lens), it is possible to get a high quality image with sufficient depth of field for candids and environmental portraits. This means that we can set the camera to Auto ISO, set the minimum shutter speed at say, 1/60s (or faster if we're going for a moving subject), and the camera will use ISO 160 all of the time outdoors, and even under many circumstances indoors.

 

This is what I did for a recent pre-wedding photo session for a cousin, and I was very happy with the results from the camera, not withstanding generally poor skill from myself!

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Thank you Rotary for awakening a dead thread. ISO is an area that with the M8 deserves revisiting from time to time.

 

I agree with Andrew/fWord's comments here and would only add that with practice and patience, our cameras also allow for use of very slow shutter speeds to facilitate work in low light. I usually opt for lower ISO coupled with slower shutter speed when I can get away with it. Of course depending on the type of photo I am taking; action, or shallow DOF for subject isolation etc.

 

David

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Thanks for pointing out the finer points of the auto ISO settings. I have been having too much fun taking photos, and hadn't bother to review all the different settings.

 

Those photos from JFK's election are pretty cool. Winogrand sure had a good eye.

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Here's a self-portrait from the M8 at ISO 640, f4 and 1/4 sec shot in DNG. I then converted it in Silver Efex for an antique plate look, hence the grain. Very usable.

 

Do any of you have suggestions of the best way to remove reflections in glasses in Photoshop CS3, (apart from not wearing them of course)?

 

Yup, using the exact set up, all you need to do is raise the glasses at the ear 5-7mm. It won't affect the picture visually and is a quicker fix than photoshop.

 

If memory serves me, this set of pics were shot between 1250 and maximum iso: Weekend Night, Cork City…

 

I feel content will always over-ride quality in a well composed shot. But I had sunk a few pints when I shot this set. I do tend to shoot at 160iso for the most part, unlike when I'm shooting with my Nikon's.

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I use up to 1250 and agree with the film grain approach, yes it is grainy, sometimes if you drop an EV in Lightroom the grain will reduce slightly.

 

It's filmic and not as digital with noise as other camera. I quite like it

 

A couple at night with my 28 Summicron at F2, the smaller the image the less grainy it appears. I never use LR noise reduction as it always makes images look less filmic, loses detail and can make faces and skin tones look a little plastic. Its interesting I thought it was amazing on my GF1, I guess the grain on that camera was more offensive.

 

It's the 'film verité' of the Leica lens which is so beautiful. Lovely pictures. I believe that regardless of how old the M8 is, it can document life precious moments beautifully with the right glass attached, regardless of iso.

 

I often think of Tim Hetherington's picture of an exhausted solider taken with a noctilux in the depth of night. It was out of focus and suffered motion blur. None of that mattered. He was a brave and insightful photographer. Never be afraid of using high iso on the M8, just use it knowingly. In dark light, the range finder will be in focus before anything other than a Nikon D4.

The set of pics below we're shot a 640iso and above. I prefer the Leica when going to gigs now as it it discreet, and security just think you are there for the gig, which is generally the case.

Acid Rock

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Situation dictates, but...

 

Color, to be printed or viewed large:

Never above 320

Black and white to be printed or viewed large:

Never above 640

 

For web size, will bump up one ISO

For certain subjects where fine detail, color accuracy or texture is less important, ok to bump up one ISO level

 

Always used an xrite color checker pro to create a color profile for each lens at each ISO level... unfortunately the noise and color accuracy of the M8 is pretty awful and requires careful attention in post many times.

 

But we learn to love our Leica's flaws and describe them as charming and special, so none of that matters.

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great at 2500, do you employ any special technique

I use aperture in pp though have p'shop cs5 but use rarely on my pics.

 

Steve

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exposure compensation +1 /+2

Then I use aperture to give more black and reduce the exposure again. It works well in many situations. You will get the feeling for the light and the compensation.

 

Thomas

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exposure compensation +1 /+2

Then I use aperture to give more black and reduce the exposure again. It works well in many situations. You will get the feeling for the light and the compensation.

 

Thomas

 

So you actually shoot at ISO 1250 / 640 and adjust the file from there …

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