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A bit more about Bentley from a friend since we were in 4th grade, Spencer Siverbach: 

Thanks. My own personal favorite is B45FC, really the progenitor, but some might argue that B67AE is the original as it is the 1st fastback. There are at least 3 other MBAs - Simon Taylor has a coupe and there is a saloon but not certain of the body builder - maybe Gurney Nutting which have more traditional style since the Embiricos car has no Bentley grille and the 3rd, since it too has no B grille is the Corniche which was rebuilt by Ken Lea over a decade. As to the drophead, a southern Cal Bentley aficionado did it over the course of 4 years and the bits he didn't use including the bonnet (hood), grille, headlamps and pillars and lots of odds and bods is in my shed and will be used on B39HM, the boat tail speedster we're building. That drophead is a G series. AS to performance, it is my opinion that the top speed achieved by that car was ~ 114 mph. Sorry for that pedantic rant.
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I was going to wait a while, but it seems more than one have taken the time to pursue the story behind this fascinating and remarkable automobile & are aware of the identity of this thing so I think it's time to reveal all. It's the 1935 Hoffman 8X..............and as indicated, it's the only one ever made. The curious thing about this car is that even though it wasn't officially commissioned by one of the big manufacturers there seems to have been enough money available to develop a on

Not a 450, 150, 200 or 300 - rarer than those, with only two original factory cars made, although some have been cobbled together later. Given that you can't measure the engine size from my photo and John is going away I will disclose that it is a 250S. This was the first car to use the new (or at least much revised) four cylinder engine planned for the forthcoming T series birdcage models. The idea was to produce a car with the straight line performance of the 300S but with the lighter and torq

Thanks, Ronald. I found the 906 to be a delightful car, one you didn't so much drive, but rather would "think" around curves, so precise and light and predictable is the handling. It's pointless to try to debate whether it was wise to drive it on the street, since it was simply not made for 'grocery getting' and it's foolish to complain that it's  not suitable for that function, but take it on a brief, vigorous run on a beautiful Saturday morning and it'll change forever your outlook of what a s

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16 hours ago, hektor said:

Close enough Nigel,  In fact this wheel was fitted to the 1959-1967 W111 and W112 series cars with 13" wheels.  Unfortunately the tyre size is no longer available whereby the "Heckflosse" series not only look silly but have heavy steering.

Hektor

Have you tried contacting Julian Majzub of The Blockley Tyre Co. to see if he can help?

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1 hour ago, NigelG said:

Hektor

Have you tried contacting Julian Majzub of The Blockley Tyre Co. to see if he can help?

Thank-you Nigel,  I did discuss 13" tyres with him last year when buying two sets of 14".  I sold my Ponton Cabriolet some years ago.

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While on the subject of 4¼litre Derby Bentleys, does anyone know what happened to the Garthwaite car from New York?  It had a not dissimilar body to the Embiricos, but with a traditional Bentley radiator grille.

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12 minutes ago, hektor said:

Thank-you Nigel,  I did discuss 13" tyres with him last year when buying two sets of 14".  I sold my Ponton Cabriolet some years ago.

Well he seemed like the most likely source if there was one - and he probably could have knocked up some whitewalls...

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1 hour ago, NigelG said:

Well he seemed like the most likely source if there was one - and he probably could have knocked up some whitewalls...

 

Mazjub can source and supply 13" tyres, but the sidewalls are not the correct height whereby the rolling radius is too small.  Furthermore I have an aversion to "whitewalls" !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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54 minutes ago, hektor said:

 

Mazjub can source and supply 13" tyres, but the sidewalls are not the correct height whereby the rolling radius is too small.  Furthermore I have an aversion to "whitewalls" !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Me too! but I was thinking re the ponton where a “stripe” rather than a full whitewall seems period...

Julian offered me some of his radials for my Bristol to try out gratis vs my stubbornly “period-correct” crossplys and I will try them once I am back in the uk. A friend felt the period-correct radial alternative Michelin  Xs made the (unassisted) steering on his 409 ser 1  too heavy and tbh I quite like the fact that the “vagaries” of crossply tyres  mean I don’t “push-on” despite a (large) V8 overbore and brake upgrade.

I will put his radials on my pending rebuilt 383cu 411 ser 1

 

 

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Coker make a lot of period size tyres as well under both their own brand and Excelsior (using the old Michelin racing tyre moulds). I use Excelsior Competition H 4.00 x 19 cross ply tyres, which are made for Bugatti 37 race cars, on the front of my Morgan Three Wheeler and they are excellent. They don't suffer from flat spots to the same extent as Julian's three stud equivalent and I think are a bit more progressive.

For rallies and track use on my 1977 911 RSR, I use Michelin Racing TB15 in 20-53 (225/50) x 15 on the front and 23-62 (270/45) x15 on the rear. They are brilliant tyres but very expensive and only last around 1000 to 1500 miles for the back pair. For regular road use, there were until quite recently, no tyres made in the correct size or anything near correct. Good old Michelin agreed to help us RSR owners and upped the carcass strength of the MXW 255/45 x 15 that they already made for Alpine cars, from 87 load rating to 93 load rating, which was then suitable for the 911 RSR's. These don't have the grip of the TB15's but are far longer lasting. Good thing too as they £450 each. I would fit R16 or R17 wheels, where there is a far larger selection of tyres available plus, as made in larger numbers, cheaper as well but they are not homologated for the 76-78 cars, so a fussy FIA scrutineer could fail me on those. I had a scrutineer get niggly because I have 6 piston brake callipers on the front and he felt I should only have 4 piston ones (he was wrong, the 1976-78 cars had 917 spec brakes from new, with 6 piston callipers). 

Wilson

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10 hours ago, hektor said:

While on the subject of 4¼litre Derby Bentleys, does anyone know what happened to the Garthwaite car from New York?  It had a not dissimilar body to the Embiricos, but with a traditional Bentley radiator grille.

I think Simon Taylor in the UK may now own this car. He certainly has a streamline 4¼. 

Wilson

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Not to stir the pot, but as long as we're talking Bentley, here's another interesting specimen we could spend hour upon hour arguing about & debating.....the famous 'Blue Train Bentley', with which Woolf Barnato supposedly won a wager that he could beat the Blue train from the Riviera to Calais, a feat that a Rover had just accomplished in January of 1930.

It's a murky story, ( if interested you can find it easily on the interweb ) one where there does not seem to exist one definitive version of all the events that actually took place, but the 1930 Bentley Speed Six 3-seat Gurney - Nutting Coupe shown below ( as entered at Pebble Beach a few years back after a thorough period of research and restoration ) is the very car that the media 'went with' back in the day to romanticize the whole adventure, egged on by Barnato himself, who was chairman of Bentley at the time, just prior to their financial collapse & purchase by Rolls-Royce. Turns out Barnato actually drove another Speed Six, a saloon, to beat the train but felt that as long as the press had the Coupe winning the contest it added more glamour and mystiquye to the story and jsimply allowed the press have it their way.  

I spoke to the owner of the Blue Train coupe at the Pebble Beach showing, where he revealed ( not for the first time)  that in order to be able to ensure that he could honestly claim to own the real Blue Train Bentley, he initiated more than two years of research, with the result that he had to buy three Bentley Speed Six sedans from various corners of the world to retrieve all the original components of the real race winner, which 'donated' bits & pieces to other Bentley collectors in components for the Speed Six...........all according to his lengthy and costly research. He also mentioned that those are the two cars in his collection he will never sell............and it's one Hell of a collection.

And even if the whole episode is all hype and legend, the specs of a Speed Six Bentley are impressive enough on their own: 6 1/2 liter in-line six cylinder motor, integrated block & head to eliminate head gaket problems, twin plug ignition, 4 valves per cylinder and a very intersting OHC drive system......not to mention that this particular car is damned attractive.

Probably would not have made a good subject for  the 'name this car' thread, since there are so many fables and anecdotes floating around and there appearantly is no one single car which was the actual, definitive, certified car used in the whole Blue Train adventure. 

M-9P / 50mm Summilux Asph FLE.

JZG

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One of the joint designers of the Bisiluro (literally “twin torpedo”) was architect Carlo Mollino who was also a rather “dedicated” photographer having an entire apartment/studio set up just to photograph women selected on the street - for a long time shot with a Leica IIIb. 
His museum foundation has a section...

https://www.carlomollino.org/photography

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The Nardi was sadly and literally blown away by the wake of the very non-aerodynamic 375MM Ferraris at Le Mans, finally right into a ditch. It was never raced again. 

Wilson

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Concerning the bentley Blue Train, here's a bit more form my frient Spencer Silverbach:

 

Hi Stu
What is known is that the fine imposed by France was much larger than the wager, which he won. As to the actual Blue Train 6 1/2 is that it was certainly a saloon (sedan) and that the current coupe was restored from a breaker's yard (junk yard) by Hugh Harben in ~1968. It was bought to USA ~ 1985 and was at that time the most costly WO Bentley ever sold -~ $350,000! It was in the hands of a SF Bay area car dealer and was sat in by me!
Cheers mate
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