Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

vor 2 Stunden schrieb thomasstellwag:

sorry for the mislead, I was so fascinated by the geometry of my detail picture, that I didn´t think about false information 🙂

No problem, to keep it road legal it needs blinkers. The one on the side are quite common with the vehicle in question so not misleading a guess.

Aside that they were not coupled to a special maker, they are on tractors and sportscars.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 16.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • wlaidlaw

    2646

  • Rona!d

    2359

  • stuny

    1885

  • a.j.z

    859

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I was going to wait a while, but it seems more than one have taken the time to pursue the story behind this fascinating and remarkable automobile & are aware of the identity of this thing so I think it's time to reveal all. It's the 1935 Hoffman 8X..............and as indicated, it's the only one ever made. The curious thing about this car is that even though it wasn't officially commissioned by one of the big manufacturers there seems to have been enough money available to develop a on

Not a 450, 150, 200 or 300 - rarer than those, with only two original factory cars made, although some have been cobbled together later. Given that you can't measure the engine size from my photo and John is going away I will disclose that it is a 250S. This was the first car to use the new (or at least much revised) four cylinder engine planned for the forthcoming T series birdcage models. The idea was to produce a car with the straight line performance of the 300S but with the lighter and torq

Thanks, Ronald. I found the 906 to be a delightful car, one you didn't so much drive, but rather would "think" around curves, so precise and light and predictable is the handling. It's pointless to try to debate whether it was wise to drive it on the street, since it was simply not made for 'grocery getting' and it's foolish to complain that it's  not suitable for that function, but take it on a brief, vigorous run on a beautiful Saturday morning and it'll change forever your outlook of what a s

Posted Images

According to this threads system (maker and model), this vehicle is an FMR (maker) Messerschmitt KR200 (model).

FMR = „Fahrzeug- und Maschinenbau Regensburg“

Messerschmitt produced this vehicle in their Regensburg factory (RSM = „Regensburger Stahl- und Maschinenbau“) until 1956, FMR followed as maker from 1957 to 1964.

FMR logo shown on the vehicles front and hub cap.

Irrelevant nitpicking of course ;-)))

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A colleague at work, had one of the FMR Tg500 4 wheel models but with the 19 BHP Fichtel and Sachs engine replaced with a water cooled Suzuki 750 Triple tuned to give around 80 BHP. I am afraid I was never brave enough to accept the offer of a ride in in it. He claimed it was capable of well over 120MPH at which point I asked if that was before or after take off. Amazingly he never had an accident in it, even taking it round the Nordschleife on a Messerschmitt outing to Germany. 

Wilson

Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Wilson, you should have tried it. With the original small engine it could go 87 MPH which was pretty fast. There are Goggos which have a 200hp motorcycle engine. Scary!

I have a funny story to share. When my dad was young he and his friends put a Messerschmitt on the jumping-off point of a ski jump which was located directly in front of the winter hotels breakfast terrace. Imagine the face of the lady who owned that thing! I have to ask my dad about the punishment of my grandfather who owned the hotel. I guess one year shoe polishing of the guest shoes.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Rona!d said:

According to this threads system (maker and model), this vehicle is an FMR (maker) Messerschmitt KR200 (model)....FMR = „Fahrzeug- und Maschinenbau Regensburg“......Messerschmitt produced this vehicle in their Regensburg factory („Regensburger Stahl- und Maschinenbau“) until 1956, FMR followed as maker from 1957 to 1964......FMR logo shown on the vehicles front and hub cap......Irrelevant nitpicking of course ;-)))

Far from it, Ronald; that was very interesting to read! I've probably seen many more FMR-badged KR's than the original without once realising that they weren't 'Messerschmitt-Made'.

Thanks for that tid-bit of trivia!

Philip.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

when we are telling stories about this car- here is mine, told from a student friend from university.  In Saar area, he was living in an appartment house. One of his neigbors, an old man, had such a Kabinenroller. Those bad guys waited sometimes for him, when he came home from shopping and had parked the car. Before he could open the cabin, they pushed the car below a balcony of the house. Thus he could not get off the car as he could not drive backwards. His wife in short learnt it and always looked out of the window when he was missing too long. In those cases, she went down, pushed the car back and freed man and meal.

Edited by thomasstellwag
Link to post
Share on other sites

These used to be popular as were registered as motorbikes so cheaper tax & fees and lower minimum age of driver.

Have no proper access to my photo library for some days, so anybody please post the next one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, AZach said:

These used to be popular as were registered as motorbikes so cheaper tax & fees and lower minimum age of driver.

Have no proper access to my photo library for some days, so anybody please post the next one.

the old licence class 4 allowed to drive bikes and car up to 250ccm, therefore Goggo, etc. even many Fiat 500 or 126 and Honda 600 reduced to 250ccm were driven by elder people

Link to post
Share on other sites
vor 1 Stunde schrieb thomasstellwag:

the old licence class 4 allowed to drive bikes and car up to 250ccm, therefore Goggo, etc. even many Fiat 500 or 126 and Honda 600 reduced to 250ccm were driven by elder people

And those weren´t just traffic jam makers they made a hell of noise in high revs at the speed of maybe 40-60 km/h. Consumed more gasoline than the unlimited cars with larger engines too. "Natural selection by age" stopped most of them in the early 2000s.

Not sure if this had been shared here. Old Goggomobile driver with class 4 driving license anno 1985:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We still have the same semi-mobile traffic jams in France with the driver licence free microcars from the likes of Aixam and Ligier. There are a couple of these single cylinder diesel cement mixer engined horrors in the village, where in normal years I would be usually be at this time of year. The road up to this mountain village is quite narrow, steep and very twisty. I used to be able to get past them in my 911 Turbo on the couple of very short straights and sometimes still can in my Three Wheeler Morgan but in my Panamera, I need some cooperation from the micro car driver. As they appear blissfully unaware of other road users, you usually don't get that, so stuck behind them for the whole 7km at 20-30 KPH, breathing in their diesel fumes. I note they have obviously irritated others even more than me, as one of them got torched or maybe it just self-immolated in shame. 

Wilson

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, stuny said:

That suggests an Alfa before Ferrari managed their team

My mistake in wording. Yep Ferrari was managing the team when he raced this Alfa 1935 8C. I meant to imply "before he designed his own cars..." but indeed it has his prancing horse on the hood. This cockpit pic taken at the 2015 Lime Rock Historic weekend where the car was run on the track flat out with glorious sound. This is the Nuvolari car that sold for a record £5.9 million in 2013. Been lurking for years, my first post....

Link to post
Share on other sites

The 8C Alfas are IMHO the nicest of all pre-war cars to drive. The engine is wonderfully torquey, they handle well and the brakes, unlike most Bugattis, are about as good as drums get. The only let down is the standard very slow gearchange, where 2nd and 3rd gears are in different zip codes. However, many of these cars have been converted to use the P3 Alfa "dog" box, with permanently engaged gears and dog ring selection, which is a huge improvement. The earlier Monza 2300 cars feel quite fragile but the later 8C2600 Corsa and 8C2900 cars are pretty bulletproof. 

Wilson

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...