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I was going to wait a while, but it seems more than one have taken the time to pursue the story behind this fascinating and remarkable automobile & are aware of the identity of this thing so I think it's time to reveal all. It's the 1935 Hoffman 8X..............and as indicated, it's the only one ever made. The curious thing about this car is that even though it wasn't officially commissioned by one of the big manufacturers there seems to have been enough money available to develop a on

Not a 450, 150, 200 or 300 - rarer than those, with only two original factory cars made, although some have been cobbled together later. Given that you can't measure the engine size from my photo and John is going away I will disclose that it is a 250S. This was the first car to use the new (or at least much revised) four cylinder engine planned for the forthcoming T series birdcage models. The idea was to produce a car with the straight line performance of the 300S but with the lighter and torq

Thanks, Ronald. I found the 906 to be a delightful car, one you didn't so much drive, but rather would "think" around curves, so precise and light and predictable is the handling. It's pointless to try to debate whether it was wise to drive it on the street, since it was simply not made for 'grocery getting' and it's foolish to complain that it's  not suitable for that function, but take it on a brief, vigorous run on a beautiful Saturday morning and it'll change forever your outlook of what a s

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16 minutes ago, NigelG said:

But with hopefully a less maddeningly florid style than LJKS...

His "Long Lane with Turnings" was a rather disappointing book. I would like to acquire a copy of his "The Power to Fly" but they are now fetching silly prices. 

Wilson

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Thank you, UliWer. sorry for the delay - having some work done on the house with contractors swarming all over the place.

This next one should be fairly quick & painless - rare, and fast.

JZG

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Wilson - not from south of the alps.

Ronald - getting quite warm. Yes, British - "Maybe even smaller maker" pretty much sums it up. Piper's green is a non-metallic color, whereas this car is more Aston-Martin racing green. 28 cars produced from '65 to '68 with a variety of engines, with a further 50 or so 'kits' being sold, for clients to build and complete their own ideas. A few were even used as road cars.

Below, a further clue, which ought to clinch it.

JZG

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Not the correct green for David's cars. I did wonder if it was his P3/4 but the flying buttresses were solid on that. The colour is more Aston-Martin-ish but it is definitely not either one of the Gipfast or Nimrod cars. The bulge in the roof is the sort of thing one would expect to see from Marcos and the colour is the same as the later XP. 

Wilson

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6 hours ago, wlaidlaw said:

It might be a Ginetta G12? 

Wilson

You nailed it, Wilson....it is a Ginetta, a '68 G12.

Wonderful little rockets they are too, predictable, fast, very easy and nice to drive, and a solid selection of proven, top-rated /components to assure long life and reliability.

M240-P / 25mm Summilux FLE

JZG

 

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This little jewel desrves its own thread - instead, please allow me to feature a short series of images of the car here.

The GRP front body section as well as the rear section are easily removable for servicing - shown here the H20 radiator, Triumph based front suspension, rack & pinion steering. Unless requested otherwise, Minilite wheels were standard. It may look flimsy, but the welded chromemoly tubing steel frame holds the 900 kg car together rigidly and reliably.

JZG

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Side view. The reason the Ford GT-40 was called that is because the night before the unveiling to the press, someone realized that the car had no official name / designation. Since great effort had been expended to make it as low and aerodynamic as possible, it was quickly decided to name it the GT40 since the car , race-ready, was 40 inches tall. I didn't actually measure it, but I'm certain this thing is lower yet.

JZG

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A wide variety of engines could be specified, depending upon what the car was going to be used for, what class it was to compete in and how much HP the owner / driver was prepared to handle. Everything from 1000 cc to 4.7 Shelby-Cobra Fords were offered, but the majority were sold with 1100, 1600 & 2000cc four-cal. motors from Cowworth, BMW, BRM & Lotus. One was delivered with an Aston-Martin Vantage V-8 shoehorned into the rear !

JZG

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The Ginetta G12 only fetches about half what its contemporary and quite similar Chevron B8 fetches, why I don't know. The G12 is nicer to drive than the B8. Derek Bennett did not really get the handling of his GT cars sorted until the B16, which is a delight to drive. I will search for a new car today. 

Wilson

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vor 12 Stunden schrieb John Z. Goriup:

but the welded chromemoly tubing steel frame holds the 900 kg car together rigidly and reliably.

I was wondering where the 900 kg come from. Thought they were MUCH lighter. Massimo Guerra made a "hill climb" G12 with 580 kg (Lotus twin cam) and that I thought is heavy.

Even a street legal Alpine A110 was only 710 kg.

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