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Thank you, Philip...............for a change of pace, I think this one should be exceedingly easy to solve, since this puzzle car is so very distinctive and ( I think ) quite unmistakable.

I do ask however that whoever identifies it correctly does so by providing the exact, full name / designation of the car, not just a generic model name.

JZG

Edited by John Z. Goriup
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I was going to wait a while, but it seems more than one have taken the time to pursue the story behind this fascinating and remarkable automobile & are aware of the identity of this thing so I think it's time to reveal all. It's the 1935 Hoffman 8X..............and as indicated, it's the only one ever made. The curious thing about this car is that even though it wasn't officially commissioned by one of the big manufacturers there seems to have been enough money available to develop a on

Not a 450, 150, 200 or 300 - rarer than those, with only two original factory cars made, although some have been cobbled together later. Given that you can't measure the engine size from my photo and John is going away I will disclose that it is a 250S. This was the first car to use the new (or at least much revised) four cylinder engine planned for the forthcoming T series birdcage models. The idea was to produce a car with the straight line performance of the 300S but with the lighter and torq

I have several and will search... but here's a really unrecognizable one... 😎 because my dad had some normal cars... but HIS dad even BUILT its own !! he had a small workshop for agri gear... and put some pieces together in 1900, as recorded time ago in our local newspaper (dirty scan hereunder) ... after that (1902)  he was approached by a gentleman from Turin who easily convinced him that making cars needed organization... 😁... and capital... and that was better to sell FIATs instead of making

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1 hour ago, Rona!d said:

Perhaps too easy so nobody takes it ;-))) Personally I have NO CLUE. Could be anything.

Not quite, Ronald; John did say "puzzle car" so that rules out my initial thought which was a London Double-Decker Bus...

:)

Philip.

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Maybe a larger crop will make it easier...................no, not American, and much smaller & more exotic than a Double-Decker bus. Here I thought that the red paint and the carbon-fiber egg- crate grill would immediately give away its identity.

JZG

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Philip, the original design of the car that this very limited-number modified edition is heavily based on was indeed by Pininfarina, although the actual execution of the five 'production'  examples and one prototype was carried out by Michelotto.

Hope to hear from more of the usual suspects.

JZG

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We were following a badly driven clapped out one of those on the Coupe des Alpes in 2010 in my 1977 911 RSR and the huge trail of oil smoke (maybe turbo seals) was making us feel ill. Of course it was considerably faster than us down the few short straights on one of the mountain passes around Isola 2000, so when we got to some road work traffic lights, I pushed past and rolled down my window to apologise for pushing past explaining that his oil smoke was making us feel ill. Once past him, we disappeared off into the distance. When we got to the sea front at Cannes for the finish of the rally about 90 minutes later, he came storming up to me shouting the odds and threatening me. What he didn't realise was that my much larger and younger co-driver was right behind him and he picked him up by the scruff of his neck and seat of his trousers and dumped him in a fountain to cool off. Not an improvement on the pretty original. 

Wilson

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Posted (edited)

OK; didn't know what it was so in the end, once more, I donned the Deerstalker. I sort-of wish I hadn't......Aaaaggggghhhhhhh! My EYES!!!!.....

:o

I had absolutely no idea some lunatic had taken one of my favourite Ferrari designs of that period - the 288 GTO - and created such a hideous monster. Unbelievable. To quote Billy Connoly; "Hangin's too good for some people; it's a good kick up the arse they need!"...

I'm guessing it is a Ferrari 288 Evoluzione?

Oddly enough before John posted the second crop (showing the lights) I was reminded of such Ferraris as the Mondial and the '80s Testarossa but, of course, the grille pictured simply had to come from something far uglier. So I was on the right track only I didn't know it!

Philip.

Edited by pippy
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vor 1 Stunde schrieb pippy:

Oddly enough before John posted the second crop (showing the lights) I was reminded of such Ferraris as the Mondial and the '80s Testarossa but, of course, the grille pictured simply had to come from something far uglier. So I was on the right track only I didn't know it!

Philip.

Walked the same path (Testarossa, Mondial, F40 etc.) 😉 Back in these days I didn´t like Ferraris design and the Evo was the car I IGNORED most because of it´s weird front design (which made sense technically).

Chassis was a masterpiece with being 3x stiffer but 40% lighter than the serial model. With the latest engine around 650 hp (they started with 400 hp) it must have been a monster to drive.

I´m with Wilson, the basic 288 GTO looks much nicer except the weird rear mirrors.

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Even the factory uprated 288GTO's (500HP) are very tricky to drive in the wet. After a very noticeable lag, the turbos then hit very hard and suddenly. With the stiff limited slip diff, you are instantly travelling sideways, with the lightly loaded front wheels having insufficient bite for opposite lock to have much effect. The one I drove (in the dry), sometime later, had a huge accident and was written off, when it hit a wet patch while overtaking. I hate to think what those EVO's must have been like in the wet. Of course there was no such thing on the 288, as electronic stability or traction control, whose reaction time is a fraction of that of the most skilled and experienced driver. 

Wilson

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, John Z. Goriup said:

Here I thought that the red paint and the carbon-fiber egg- crate grill would immediately give away its identity.

The first crop was I think quite clever as for me it’s the lights that give it away not the grille...and I much prefer what it begat  - the F40

Edited by NigelG
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It appears four of you gentlemen ( Ronald, a.j.z., Wilson, and Philip ) have identified this thing by indirectly but unambiguosly describing the puzzle car correctly, however I think Philip should get this one since he actually spelled out what it is............. Ferrari 288 GTO Evoluzione.

Brutal, with a 'controversial' front design  derived from extensive wind-tunnel testing to correct the 288 GTO's road version tendency to lift, it must be remembered that this car eveloved into one of Ferrari's greatest designs, the F-40 in an astonishingly short 13 month, and became the development mule and prelude to the F-40, the ultimate ( and first ) Ferrari 'supercar' and the very last Maranello product to have Enzo's direct input and imprimatur., and initiaing a long line of successes, - F 40, F50, ENZO & La Ferrari. The outward design was handled by Leonardo Fioravanti ( Pininfarina) assisted by Aldo Brovarone. During its truncated development as a true race car, the 288 EVO became the prototype for the F-40, which went on to become the most popular road Ferrari ever while it was in production, at 1336 units built from 1988 through 1992, displacing the Daytona. Powertrain and chassis design was handled and designed by Ermano Bonfiglioli, who created  the mechanical portion of the 2100 lbs. F-40 consisting of a longitudinally mounted 478 HP twin turbo-charged V-8 with many major parts made from magnesium, and a small-diameter steel tube space frame  reinforced with Kevlar composite panels for a 3x improvement in torsional rigidity over all its competitors.

Good Luck, Philip

JZG

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For refernece purposes only, I have taken the liberty of posting a couple of similar images of some F-40s......from the 25th anniversary celebration of the model at the annual Ferrari Club of America gathering.

JZG

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