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Name this car....

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I have nothing to post as I have been shielding for the past 2 months and have not taken a single photo of note as yet with my new M10-R. I was looking at Mark V prices just now and they are quite high. The other prices that astonished me was the XK150S Coupé prices, which I think is a horrible car. Some are asking over £100k for these cars. They flex so much that it is not uncommon for the doors to fly open in bumpy corners. I sold my near perfect BRG 3.8 XK150S with a factory wide angle D type head engine for just £800 in 1972 and I was very glad to see the back of it. 

Wilson

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Beautiful. In 1947 when we lived in Vienna, my father managed to obtain one of these in the same color with camel-hair color interior  from an American general whom he had befriended. Even though I was only eight years old at the time, I still remember how smooth the V-12 motor was & how much my Dad used to enjoy taking the family for brief drives.............when we could find suitable gasoline for it.

I'll 'hold my fire' & give someone else the opportunity to solve this.

JZG

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On 9/12/2020 at 3:16 AM, John Z. Goriup said:

I submit that in this case ugly is only as ugly does..................meaning that we have to bear in mind that the GT1 was designed primarily to compete in the FIA GT1 class, which mandated that the race cars built by a manufacturer in that class had to have a specified ( 20, I believe)  number of road-legal counterparts that could be purchased by the public. The race car was a highly researched and wind tunnel developed Weissach combination of Porsche 993, 911 and 962 elements which, during its lifetime was entered in a total of 133 races, winning 47 of them - not at all ugly.

The FIA further specified that the road versions could not deviate significantly from the racing version, which goes a long way to explain why they perhaps looked a little awkward at a useful and acceptable riding height, and with all the legal acoutrements required for licensing for the street. 

A good friends 1997 GT1, class winner of that years Daytona 24 Hours.

SL /  16-35 S.V.E.

JZG

John,

That colour scheme breaks up the lines nicely - looks a lot better than the single white colour of the road car!

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18 hours ago, John Z. Goriup said:

Beautiful. In 1947 when we lived in Vienna, my father managed to obtain one of these in the same color with camel-hair color interior  from an American general whom he had befriended. Even though I was only eight years old at the time, I still remember how smooth the V-12 motor was & how much my Dad used to enjoy taking the family for brief drives..JZG

Yes, those flathead V-12's were smooth and sounded great (had a weak crankshaft however).  My family had a '39 four-door convertible phaeton bodied version, green with a ox blood leather interior.

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On 9/14/2020 at 11:52 AM, stuny said:

Thank you, John.

Briggs Cunningham and Lake Underwood raced a Porsche 904 at Sebring, taking first in class.  Lake kept that little beauty in the window of his Air Cooled Motors VW/Porsche dealership in South Orange, New Jersey for several months.  I loved passing there, and stopping to ogle the car.  Years later Lake tried to solve a problem on my Audi 100 LS himself, rolling up his custom shirtsleeves to go at it.

Let's try something a bit less exotic:

Stuart, it appears we're at an impasse, therefore to keep this thread going, I'll venture a gues that what we've got here is a 1939 Lincoln Zephyr three-window Coupe.

I sincerely hope I identified it correctly, otherwise I will have made a bigger ass of myself than usually.

JZG

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8 hours ago, John Z. Goriup said:

Stuart, it appears we're at an impasse, therefore to keep this thread going, I'll venture a gues that what we've got here is a 1939 Lincoln Zephyr three-window Coupe.

I sincerely hope I identified it correctly, otherwise I will have made a bigger ass of myself than usually.

JZG

Were some produced with chrome window surrounds and others without?

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John -

Plenty close enough - Actually a 1940, and it has a V12 engine.  Now and then Lincoln recycles the basic theme of the grill, which is why I cropped it from the previous image  Your turn, and you've not made an ass of yourself.

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I think I finally may have found a car that I'm fairly confident not even Hektor will be able to identify immediately.............(famous last words).

The name of this car, please.

JZG

 

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6 hours ago, m410 said:

Worlds fastest cat.

Without requiring you to actually spell out the name of this thing, I will accept this as the correct identification.

It's a '63  Cheetah.

JZG

 

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Cheetahs were built by Bill Thomas, a southern California hot-rod shop owner who had specialized in modifying and racing Chevrolet Corvettes and was quite succesful with many victories chalked up by his modified cars.When Shelby Cobras started to dominate US sportscar racing in the early sixties, he approached General Motors, who had just issued their infamous "No Racing" edict to obtain support to build a car to take on the Cobras, even poroviding a couple of aluminum bodied samples for their evaluation. Little is known about the machinations between Thomas and GM. There was a contract, and all Cheetahs utilized  370+ cu.in. Chevrolet V8s.In any event, it is estimated that about a dozen or so cars were built altogether during '63 & 64, with the rest of them after the two alloy bodied examples having Fiberglass bodies. If I recall correctly, Thomas passed on in the late sixties, and there were attempts to keep things going with 'continuations', but no significant volume was ever achieved.

As for the cars themselves, they were, frankly speaking, a real mess. The frames were made of small-diameter steel tubing lacking triangulation,  it was a mid-front engined layout with dreadful weight distribution - the engine was so far back the transmission tailshaft connected directly to the differential flange via a U-joint - creating huge heating problems for the suffering driver whose legs were millimeters away from a 475HP motor which had inadequate airflow, the car was very light, under 1600 lbs. dry, and some very capable drivers of the day achieved scarcely believable top speeds ( 200 mph + ), but achieved little in major races, scoring some victories in minor events. 

I succumbed to a challenge back in '64 or '65 and drag-raced a Cheetah while out on a date in Chicago with my wife-to be - it may very well have been the car shown here- and he trounced my '60 Ferrari 250GT SWB thoroughly, but when we talked afterwards at a local drive-in the owner confessed that the car was a real 'one-trick pony'. It accelerated like Hell, but that was absolutely all it could do. 

This is only the second Chettah I've ever seen - Pebble Beach '08.

Leica M-8

JZG

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One more, from the rear. Magnesium American Racing Equipment wheels, 'gullwing' doors, no usable trunk space to speak of.............this was basically an amateurishly designed race car, barely housebroken for legal street use.

I recall seeing one for sale at auction recently for an estimated US$ 875,000, but I think it failed to meet reserve

Your turn, M410 - thanks for playing along.

JZG

 

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Stuart, 

I think they are old Firestone race tyres. When we raced a Martin F2 engined tubular space-frame Morgan 4/4 in late 1960's, we were tempted by the very cheap price of Firestone race tyres, especially as unlike European tyres, the 15" diameter were cheaper than the 13". They were less than half the price of the equivalent Dunlop race tyres but not very good in the dry and awful in the wet. We fairly quickly swapped to 13" wheels and Dunlop CR65 tyres in the soft white spot compound. 

Wilson

 

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Okay, thank you.  I'll see what I can submit for an i.d. question.

The added information on the Cheetah was interesting.  I do remember the Cheetahs were a pretty rowdy car and I did see them race at Riverside Raceway in 1964 and 65.  They were great in a straight line but handling on a road course was a challenge as you pointed out.  What threw me a bit was the single top mounted windshield wiper as I did not know any Cheetahs were ever legally licensed to be driven on the street.  jDD

Edited by m410

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Indeed hector. 
 

Porsche 356B Karmann  “Notchback” coupe.  
Couldn’t help myself. One of few rarer models with which I am actually familiar ... 

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