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Clever dicks and usual suspects please abstain.... this old friend and, arguably, piece of modern sculpture was resting at LM prior to doing what it was conceived to do. Designed in England, funded by America, built in England, improved by America, raced in France.....

 

Enjoyed by many................

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Too easy!

It's the yellow one in the painting, quite a history.

The Gurney bulge was just a trick of the light on this one (parked under striped awning), it did, of course have a Gurney flap though!

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All are correct, but it was not Gurney's car. I think it was a privateer who added the front spoilers to an original GT40; it is not the Mark II version, lacking the scoops on the top of the engine cover. Belgian racing yellow may be a clue, but that is probably a red herring in this case.

Regards

John W

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All are correct, but it was not Gurney's car. I think it was a privateer who added the front spoilers to an original GT40; it is not the Mark II version, lacking the scoops on the top of the engine cover. Belgian racing yellow may be a clue, but that is probably a red herring in this case.

Regards

John W

 

You mean we've been conned into thinking that this was something wot it isn't?! How unusual for that to happen in the olde car worlde.

:D:D

 

I've just bagged a copy of Ronnie Spain's GT40 bible but I've not had time to read it yet. As you can tell.

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OK, this one is less obvious unless, like me, you parked next to it this evening at the VSCC pub meeting.

Taken with the Digilux 2 in 2006, when I was still learning what digi-cams could/could not do.

 

btw, how about making this thread a long-runner? If you guess the car, you have to post the next subject?

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Guest suilvenman

 

btw, how about making this thread a long-runner? If you guess the car, you have to post the next subject?

 

Great idea, Pete - I was hoping that somebody would suggest this.

 

That radiator construction/shape is proving a challenge to identify and the thermometer mascot doesn't really help much. Classy two-tone paintwork. I'll suggest 1930s, British, roadster/coupé to start off with?

 

Cheers, Ken.

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