Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Not sure if this has been covered here, but just got the M9 last night. In doing sample shots I noticed that a short little vertical line appears near center (see second photo) of image when zoomed in at 100%.

 

I first thought this was a pixel problem but then it goes away with different shots of same framing. Then comes back. Regardless of SD card or camera setting... almost random. Latest firmware.

 

Thoughts? Should I return camera for exchange? Thanks.

Edited by MvMaltese
clarification
Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael--it looks like you've decided to send in the M9 according to your blog. I guess I would have, too, if that line kept showing up. In one of my early images I noticed some purple pixels, but it has never returned, so I think I am OK.

 

Hope you get your camera and 35 cron back soon!

Link to post
Share on other sites

What SD card are you using? Also, have you checked the sensor for dust?

 

I'd follow some simple process of elimination tests before sending the camera back.

 

1/ check the sensor for dust (REALLY sensible to have a sensor loupe for this, but a bright light and a magnifying glass are fairly effective). If there's dust, at the least use a Rocket blower to clear it, or (better) DRY clean it with Visible Dust Arctic Butterfly. If there's any oil spot, the consensus on the forum seems to be to use Eclipse + Full size swabs. FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS!

 

2/ check that your card is compatible with the M9 (see the FAQ on the Leica site). If yes, then format it IN camera.

 

If the problem's still there, then certainly contact your dealer.

 

Hope this helps.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all. I am sending into Leica NJ this week as I registered it after I THOUGHT I discovered the problem (SD card). But alas, the problem came back.

 

Yes, tried a whole battery of tests with cards, settings, sensor cleaning via Arctic Butterfly and puffer. Oh well. Back in the box is goes.

 

On a positive note, the resolution (aside from line) is astounding!

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

Edited by MvMaltese
clarification
Link to post
Share on other sites
If there's any oil spot, the consensus on the forum seems to be to use Eclipse + Full size swabs.

 

Chris--I know you fortunately haven't experienced oil (if that's what some of us are seeing!) on the sensor, but I'm not sure the consensus is use of the full size swab--my earlier post on the cleaning thread addressed the possibility that full-width swabs actually exacerbate the oil (or mystery substance) problem. I finally cured my issues with the narrower swabs.

 

Kip

Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

What SD card are you using? Also, have you checked the sensor for dust?

 

I'd follow some simple process of elimination tests before sending the camera back.

 

1/ check the sensor for dust (REALLY sensible to have a sensor loupe for this, but a bright light and a magnifying glass are fairly effective). If there's dust, at the least use a Rocket blower to clear it, or (better) DRY clean it with Visible Dust Arctic Butterfly. If there's any oil spot, the consensus on the forum seems to be to use Eclipse + Full size swabs. FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS!

 

2/ check that your card is compatible with the M9 (see the FAQ on the Leica site). If yes, then format it IN camera.

 

If the problem's still there, then certainly contact your dealer.

 

Hope this helps.

I would advise NOT using a full-size swab; they tend to pull oil and dust from the well around the edges onto the sensor. A 1.33 or 1.5 size swab works better in my experience.
Link to post
Share on other sites
I would advise NOT using a full-size swab; they tend to pull oil and dust from the well around the edges onto the sensor. A 1.33 or 1.5 size swab works better in my experience.

 

 

Just curious...I use Type 1 swabs as recommended by Photographic Solutions for my M8.2. These are 20mm swabs. While I don't own an M9, I notice that they recommend Type 3 swabs for it, and these are 24 mm wide.

 

Do you use the same sized swabs for all your digital M's? Good for me to know when I eventually pick up a full frame version. I assumed the wider version was required to get the entire sensor with two strokes...back and forth.

 

Jeff

Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris--I know you fortunately haven't experienced oil (if that's what some of us are seeing!) on the sensor, but I'm not sure the consensus is use of the full size swab--my earlier post on the cleaning thread addressed the possibility that full-width swabs actually exacerbate the oil (or mystery substance) problem. I finally cured my issues with the narrower swabs.

 

Kip

 

Kip - sorry if I got the wrong end of the stick on this one!

 

Thanks for the clarification - as someone who's only ever used one of the little swabs that Visible Dust provide when I had to clean a smear on a Canon 20D sensor, I'm not an authority.

 

Best

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just curious...I use Type 1 swabs as recommended by Photographic Solutions for my M8.2. These are 20mm swabs. While I don't own an M9, I notice that they recommend Type 3 swabs for it, and these are 24 mm wide.

 

Do you use the same sized swabs for all your digital M's? Good for me to know when I eventually pick up a full frame version. I assumed the wider version was required to get the entire sensor with two strokes...back and forth.

 

Jeff

I use a number of tools not generally available, like laboratory-grade q-tips and microbrushes. But "on the road" I will use swabs one size down. I use the Giotto Rocket Blower to blow all potentially harmful grit of the sensor and I don't regard the rule of " one stroke and throw away" I will use a swab for a couple of passes. But then, I am lucky enough to be able to inspect the sensor under a microscope.
Link to post
Share on other sites
I would advise NOT using a full-size swab; they tend to pull oil and dust from the well around the edges onto the sensor. A 1.33 or 1.5 size swab works better in my experience.

 

I'll second this. Very successful with the smaller swabs.

 

Jeff

Link to post
Share on other sites
I use a number of tools not generally available, like laboratory-grade q-tips and microbrushes. But "on the road" I will use swabs one size down. I use the Giotto Rocket Blower to blow all potentially harmful grit of the sensor and I don't regard the rule of " one stroke and throw away" I will use a swab for a couple of passes. But then, I am lucky enough to be able to inspect the sensor under a microscope.

 

This is actually a good recommendation. I find that the Giottos will often blow some additional fine bits of dust onto the sensor, but its very good for getting the coarse grit off before you start swabbing away. For the swabs I use a small plastic spatula and I wrap it with PEC pads and use Eclipse. Works great. I tape the swab up all the way down almost to the tip so it doesn't leave bits of fiber or dust in the camera or pull anything in from the edges of the camera.

 

Like you, I also do a couple swabs with one. I typically find that it takes two runs to really get it clean. I have a binocular microscope, but I've never used it. I'm going to have to do that next time!

 

Jeff

Link to post
Share on other sites
This is actually a good recommendation. I find that the Giottos will often blow some additional fine bits of dust onto the sensor, but its very good for getting the coarse grit off before you start swabbing away...............

 

When I bought a new rocket type blower I had that problem. Suspected the rubber bulb contained foreign particles, perhaps mold release agent. I cured the problem by washing the inside of the bulb with water to which a few drops of washing up liquid had been added. Since then I've bought two more blowers, washed them and not had a problem. Just make sure the inside is throughly dry before use.

 

Bob.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I use a number of tools not generally available, like laboratory-grade q-tips and microbrushes. But "on the road" I will use swabs one size down. I use the Giotto Rocket Blower to blow all potentially harmful grit of the sensor and I don't regard the rule of " one stroke and throw away" I will use a swab for a couple of passes. But then, I am lucky enough to be able to inspect the sensor under a microscope.

 

Thanks. I've followed the posts discussing William's and your impressive inspection equipment, but didn't know about the lowly swab aspects.

 

I also always use a rocket blower first. Nothing else usually needed.

 

Jeff

Link to post
Share on other sites
When I bought a new rocket type blower I had that problem. Suspected the rubber bulb contained foreign particles, perhaps mold release agent. I cured the problem by washing the inside of the bulb with water to which a few drops of washing up liquid had been added. Since then I've bought two more blowers, washed them and not had a problem. Just make sure the inside is throughly dry before use.

 

Bob.

 

Ahh, good idea. I shall have to do that. Thanks!

 

Jeff

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kip - sorry if I got the wrong end of the stick on this one!

 

Thanks for the clarification - as someone who's only ever used one of the little swabs that Visible Dust provide when I had to clean a smear on a Canon 20D sensor, I'm not an authority.

 

Best

 

No apology needed, and one thing is for sure--you are an amazing photographer! I will strive over the ensuing years to improve my images with my M9, and you serve as an inspiration.

 

Take care--

 

Kip

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you...I sent my camera into Leica New Jersey and they replaced the sensor chip. Seems to work well now, although I see (especially in very dark images – faster ISO) what looks like a single RED pixel blob, in the same place on all photos (at 50-100% in viewfinder). But when I open in CO5 or Lightroom, it rasterizes itself out in final image, like a noise removal. Otherwise, camera seems to be fine after warranty repair. M

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By farnz
      Thank you to everyone who took part in last month's 143rd Barnack's Monthly theme, which was filled with more than 1,650 pictures, excellent ideas and interpretations of the theme.  Also, thank you to everyone who helped to make it another successful month by generously posting their pictures and in particular to those people who posted for the first time - I hope you found it an interesting and rewarding experience and I hope it encourages you to share more of your pictures with us!  
       The 144th Barnack's Monthly theme for September 2020 is:
       Parallel lines.
      This month's theme is any picture that includes parallel lines but they must remain equidistant over their length.  It could be one pair of parallel lines, many parallel lines, straight parallel lines, curved parallel lines, short parallel lines, long parallel lines, railway lines, lines on a wardrobe, leaded window panes, lines on a sports pitch, parallel lines on the side of an ocean liner, parallel lines formed by paving slabs, aircraft launch lines on an aircraft carrier, twin vapour trails in the sky, parking bay lines in a carpark, rugby goal posts, swimming lanes, double yellow lines following a curved kerb, the bars in a Rolls Royce grill, the parallel circular lines around a porthole, the rungs in a ladder, the styles in a ladder, the steps in a staircase, a run of flagpoles outside a large hotel, the fountain display outside the Bellagio in Las Vegas, shelving in a supermarket, an album by Blondie, a line of poplar trees beside a country lane, the furrows in a ploughed meadow, lines of Lavender bushes in Provence - it's entirely your choice so let your imagination run free!  
      It would be a help if you give your picture a title so to help us understand your point of view. Members have asked if we'd very kindly name the camera and lens used - if you can remember - because it's interesting to know but, again, it's just helpful.
      The rules are deliberately loose so go out and shoot with this month's theme in mind or start searching back through those pictures you took oh-so long ago that you'd forgotten about and start posting! It doesn't have to be your best ever shot and it's not a competition so you might surprise the rest of us and yourself - it's just about sharing some pictures, seeing others' take on the topic, and enjoying it!

      Everybody's welcome to contribute, any interpretation, any number of posts, pictures that have been posted on the forum before, any equipment as long as it and the photo complies with the forum's rules of either camera or lens or both made by Leica. Please post freely - especially newcomers and please remember there's no judging or criticism (good or bad) in this thread. So, if you'd like to show your acknowledgement or appreciation that someone has posted their picture then instead of posting a comment please use the "Thanks" button that you can find at the bottom right of every post.

      Please post away and I look forward to seeing your interesting interpretations of this month's theme.
      Note: Moderator Pop has very kindly assembled links to all of the past Barnack's Monthly threads as a single archive that can be found here: Barnack's Monthly Index.  Thank you, Pop!   Pete.
    • By farnz
      Thank you to everyone who took part in January's Barnack's Monthly theme, which was the 100th Barnack's Monthly thread! and was filled with a wonderful array of almost 300 pictures and excellent ideas and interpretations of the theme! Thank you to everyone who helped to make it another successful month by generously posting their pictures and in particular to those people who posted for the first time - I hope you found it an interesting and rewarding experience and I hope it encourages you to share more of your pictures with us!
       
      The Barnack's Monthly theme for February 2017 is: "Lines"
       
      This month's theme is "Lines", which is connected points that form a line in some way.   This could be the lines in a face, the lines up the face of a skyscraper, the lines left by a tractor ploughing a field, fishing lines, lines of unmentionable illegal substances, the lines of a well-cut suit, the centre line on a road, a starting line, lines of people waiting to enter an auditorium, washing lines, lines across the sky left by aircraft, the wash left by a jet-ski, forehead lines, ley-lines, lines on the palm of a hand, lines of lavender gracefully stretching into the distance in Provence horizons, lines on a chessboard, frame lines, chalk lines on pavement for a game of hopscotch, tram lines, railway lines, lines for motorway lanes, lines for swimming lanes, lines for supermarket checkouts, baselines, sidelines, top lines, bottom lines on balance sheets, lines from a script, the Maginot Line, a fine line, a newspaper byline, a genetic line, a telephone line, a camera line (marque), a production line, aa bucket line to extinguish a fire - it's entirely your choice so let your imagination run free!  It would be a help if you give your picture a title so to help us understand your point of view but it's not compulsory. Members have asked if we'd very kindly name the camera and lens used - if you can remember - because it's interesting to know but, again, it's not compulsory just helpful.
       
      The rules are deliberately loose so go out and shoot with this month's theme in mind or start searching back through those pictures you took oh-so long ago that you'd forgotten about and start posting! It doesn't have to be your best ever shot and it's not a competition so you might surprise the rest of us and yourself - it's just about sharing some pictures, seeing others' take on the topic, and enjoying it!

      Everybody's welcome to contribute, any interpretation, any number of posts, pictures that have been posted on the forum before, any equipment as long as it and the photo complies with the forum's rules of either camera or lens or both made by Leica. Please post freely - especially newcomers and please remember there's no judging or criticism (good or bad) in this thread. So, if you'd like to show your acknowledgement or appreciation that someone has posted their picture then instead of posting a comment please use the "Thanks" button that you can find at the bottom right of every post.

      Please post away and I look forward to seeing your interesting interpretations of this month's theme.
       
      Note: Moderator Pop has very kindly assembled links to all of the past Barnack's Monthly threads as a single archive that can be found here: Barnack's Monthly Index.  Thank you, Pop!  
      Pete
       
    • By bab
      Just an FYI.....
       
      I find my M240 when set to Classic and Center Weighted shooting in the vertical position exposes +1/3 to +2/3 to the right. And when in the Horizontal position it exposes -1/3 to -2/3 to the left underexposed.
       
      While reviewing 150 images from a street shoot it was my first time using Lightroom 5 in the library mode, I thought I would correct all of the exposures with the exposure panel.
       
      As I'm going thru the exposures I notice that only a few images are perfect exposure and 90% of the horizontal images are under exposed by -1/3 to -2/3 of a stop (to the left). So I'm going thru clicking on the right arrow to increase the exposure and every time I get to some vertically shot images they are too bright HUH! All of the vertical images except for one are overexposed by +1/3-+2/3 of a stop.
       
      So you ask did I check for the Red exposure dot and verify every image was metered correctly for the most part but that would not result in the majority of consistency's I now see.
       
      I also see that with the background being mostly white or a lot of the background white the image tends to overexpose from the meter reading when shooting with my 50 lux but when I'm shooting with my 21mm its still underexposed by -1/3 to -2/3 of a stop.
    • By Iduna
      I watched something moving in front of me, did my shot and than ran forward to find out about what made it move. Near Brooklyn Bride - NYC
       
      All with X1
       
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! 
       
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden!
    • By Iduna
      These are the first pictures from our visit in April to the Great Canyon.
      I am still busy processing the other half of my 2.000 shots from NYC,Las Vegas,Grand Canyon and Valley of Fire. I will post more if you like.
      My MKII was mounted mostly with Elmarit 60mm+2xApo Converter, the X1 had also a very busy time.
      The MKII was tweaked down to 50 ISO, polarizer and tripod (for the early morning and evening shots.)
      The shots were all taken from the Rimtrail.
       
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! 
      MKII with Telyt 250 mm - 7:00 a.m. Mathar Point
       
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! 
      MKII with Telyt 250 mm 7:15 a.m, Mathar Point
       
       
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! 
      X1, morning 11:00 a.m.
       
       
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! 
      MK 60 mm+2x Apo Concerter, 18:30 Hopi Point
       
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in to view the hidden content. Hallo Gast! Du willst die Bilder sehen? Einfach registrieren oder anmelden! 
      X1 11:00
×
×
  • Create New...