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martinkartin

Lens choices for the World Cup in SA

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I'm having quite a dilemma. I currently shoot with a Leica M8 and an M7 with a 35cron ASPH and a couple of screw mount lenses (pretty bad ones). I'm thinking of purchasing a lens/lenses for the summer. These are my options:

 

Option 1

 

Voigtlander Nokton 50mm f/1.1 and Voightlander Heliar 15mm f/4.5

 

Option 2

 

Leica Summilux 50mm f/1.4 (pre-asph/some older model)

 

Its the two lenses v.s. one dilemma. Does anyone have experiences with any of the lenses? and would it be wise to purchase 2 non-Leica lenses rather than one? I just have this feeling that using non-Leica lenses are just not right and defeats the purpose of using a Leica.. What do people think?

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;)The two outfits are equally unsuitable for shooting football, so take a Nikon D5000 with a 35mm f/1.8 and a 70-300mm VR zoom.

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With all that gear expect a) to be refused entry to the grounds and

targeted by hooligans and/or police, who think you're a journalist or police photographer.

 

Ask yourself are you going there for the sport and to take some snaps along the way, or just to take photos? If it's the latter then of course take all the gear, get good property and health insurance, and post your results here!

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Is it a possibility to be refused to the grounds? I expect thousands of cameras in the hands of people. I'm there for 1 match and the rest of the time im going to be traveling around the country.

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Is it a possibility to be refused to the grounds?<snip>
I would be surprised, there should be large masses of amateur photographers with more impressive (looking) kit entering without any problem. But presumably there are R&R concerning photography at this event??

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I'm not sure that urban South Africa is the right place to flash large cameras. I think the Leica way is far more safe than huge DSLRs. You could consider taking a Tele-Elmar 135 for in the stadium - you won't be able to get decent shots from amongst the crowd anyway, irrespective of the size of you zoom- and save the heavy gun for your excursion into Kruger.

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You're lucky I've got time on my hands tonight, well I haven't I should be sitting here typing up data for a mailshot tomorrow but that's another story.......

 

Anyway a quick google for the Fifa website and you can find all the info you need including .......

 

You might be an amateur but try explaining that to some security bod who only recognises camera phones or little P&S thingys.

 

Really I wouldn't bother with all that gear, take one small camera/lens for shots of supporters etc., and enjoy the event.

 

5.2 Ticket Holders may not record or transmit any sound, moving or still image or description of the Match (or any result or statistic of the Match) other than for private use. It is strictly forbidden to disseminate any sound, moving or still image, description, result or statistic of the Match, in whole or in part, for any sort of public access, irrespective of the transmission form, whether over the internet, radio, television, mobile phone, data accessory or any other current and/or future media (now known or hereinafter invented and/or devised). Ticket Holders may not assist any other person(s) to conduct such activities.

 

8.3 In the event of a violation of any terms of the GTCs, the Sales Regulations, the Stadium Code of Conduct or any other relevant laws or by-laws, in addition to the other rights and remedies that the FIFA World Cup™ Authorities may have, the FIFA World Cup™ Authorities will have the right to:

 

  • a) render null and void the Tickets of the Ticket Holder;
  • refuse entry into the Stadium to the Ticket Holder or eject the Ticket Holder from the Stadium;

3. Entry to the Stadium

Stadium Visitors and Accredited Persons shall cooperate with the FIFA World Cup Authorities, by:

 

  • a) producing a Ticket or an Accreditation and, as requested by the FIFA World Cup Stadium Authorities, proof of identity; and
  • submitting to inspections, body checks and removal of items that are prohibited to use, possess, hold or bring into the Stadium on Match days ("Prohibited Items").

Stadium Visitors and Accredited Persons agree and acknowledge to have restricted access to specified areas within the Stadium,

4. Prohibited Items

Unless otherwise authorized by the FIFA World Cup Authorities in writing, Stadium Visitors and Accredited Persons are not permitted to use, possess, hold or bring into the Stadium the following Prohibited Items:

 

  • a) weapons of any kind;
  • anything that could be used as a weapon or to cut, thrust or stab, or as a projectile, in particular long umbrellas and other unwieldy implements;
  • c) bottles, cups, jugs or cans of any kind as well as other objects made from PET, glass or any other fragile, non-shatterproof or especially tough material or Tetrapak packaging, hard cooler boxes;
  • d) fireworks, flares, smoke powder, smoke canisters, smoke bombs or other pyrotechnics;
  • e) alcoholic beverages of any kind, narcotics or stimulants;
  • f) racist, xenophobic cause, charity or ideological concern related materials, including but not limited to banners, signs, symbols and leaflets, objects or clothing, which could impair the enjoyment of the Event by other spectators, or detract from the sporting focus of the Event;
  • g) flagpoles or banner poles of any kind. Only flexible plastic poles and so-called double-poles that do not exceed 1 metre in length and 1 cm in diameter and which are not made of inflammable material are permitted;
  • h) banners or flags larger than 2m x 1m50. Smaller flags and banners are permitted provided that they are made from material which is deemed "of low flammability" and complies with national regulations and standards;
  • i) any sort of animals;
  • j) any promotional or commercial, materials, including but not limited to banners, signs, symbols and leaflets, or any kind of promotional or commercial objects, material and clothing;
  • k) gas spray cans, corrosive, flammable substances, dyes or receptacles containing substances which are harmful to health or are highly flammable. Standard pocket cigarette lighters are permitted;
  • l) unwieldy objects such as ladders, stools, (folding) chairs, boxes, paperboard containers, large bags, rucksacks, suitcases and sports bags. "Unwieldy" is given to mean all objects which are larger than 25cmx25cmx25cm and which cannot be stowed under the seat in the Stadium;
  • m) large quantities of paper and/or rolls of paper;
  • n) mechanically-operated instruments which produce an excessive volume of noise such as megaphones, hooters or gas-powered horns. Unbranded vuvuzelas are not considered Prohibited Items;
  • o) laser pointers;
  • p) cameras (except for private use and then only with one set of replacement or rechargeable batteries), video cameras or other sound or video recording equipment;
  • q) computers or other devices used for the purposes of transmitting or disseminating sound, pictures, descriptions or results of the events via the internet or other forms of media; and
  • r) other objects which could compromise public safety and/or harm the reputation of the Event as assessed at the sole discretion of the FIFA World Cup Authorities.

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I dont plan on taking my Leica into the stadium. I'm there for the game.

I'm just trying to find opinions on the right lens choice for my vacation. I should be shooting South Africa since it would be my first time there and the experience of the world cup is just something I should document.

 

The nation will be football crazy for the duration of the event and I'm looking for the right lenses that would suit the situation. Should I purchase 2 voightlanders or 1 Leica? Anyone with any suggestions?

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Well your last two posts suggested that you were taking photos specifically of the world cup, not a general trip to SA.

 

Lens choices are very personal, only you know what subjects you like to shoot, what style you prefer etc etc. Other people can tell you what they would take, but that isn't going to help you too much.

 

The 35mm is a good all rounder though.

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I do love my 35 but i just recently purchased an m8 and i'm not content with the Canon screw mount lenses + adaptor that I have. I just need a second lens and im wondering if it would be better to invest in an older summilux or the newer voigtlander f/1.1.

 

So lets change the question. Older Leica 50mm Summilux or Voigtlander 50mm Nokton f/1.1?

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I'm not sure that urban South Africa is the right place to flash large cameras. I think the Leica way is far more safe than huge DSLRs. You could consider taking a Tele-Elmar 135 for in the stadium - you won't be able to get decent shots from amongst the crowd anyway, irrespective of the size of you zoom- and save the heavy gun for your excursion into Kruger.

 

Jaapv, what a load of bollocks (excuse the french). Being based in South Africa, I've yet to experience any issues with the locals and using big kit. This includes setting up a Sinar inside a informal settlement, working with street kids addicted to solvents and generally walking around with a Rollei 6008 Integral 2.

 

Yes, there are some areas you'd be asking for trouble, as there are in London, Paris and indeed Holland, but to generalise like this, is well, rather uninformed.

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Umm.. I can understand your post, as the bad rep of SA is undeserved to some degree- but I would give the same advice for urban areas in Europe. (Ps. I visit your country regularly and I rarely feel unsafe.)

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_South_Africa

Edited by jaapv

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Yup, SA does have a bad rep and in some cases there are bad areas where one wouldn't go. I'm a Londoner and I'd feel unsafe south of the river at night, it all depends how street wise you are.

 

walking around with 5 months worth of food and living on your neck won't make you popular with the locals if you treat them like a circus act and snap away as many do when they arrive here.

 

A please and a thank you goes a long way. I spent 12 months on the streets shooting a project looking at those who live, work and play on the streets and not once did I have any issues, just a smile here and there.

 

Going back to the lens question, the two I use the most are the 50mm and the 24mm. Shooting in a stadium with a Leica will be hard work, FIFA are strict on who has access beyond the stands and to be honest, unless you are going for landscape shots, the lens choices will be limited.

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I've watched this post with some interest and have stayed out of it up until now. I felt it necessary to throw my 10 cents in following Jaap's and Dcuthbert’s comments.

 

I've lived in South Africa for 35 years. I now spend only half the year here and the rest in Europe, the unacceptable level of violent crime being one reason. When I'm in SA I'm fortunate to have my own place in the bush which is far safer than being in the cities, only lions, aggressive spitting cobras and elephants to deal with.

 

South Africa unfortunately does have a bad reputation for crime, not all of it is unfair or unwarranted. We have one of the highest levels of crime in the world, in many instances very violent and aggressive crime. And yes it's like anywhere in the world, you have to be streetwise, and know where you're going, and in SA even more so. I do a great deal of street photography with my M8 & M9 on my necessary forays into the cities, however I do know my around after 35 years. Touch wood I've never had any serious issues, other than having had a cocked and loaded gun shoved in my face while unknowingly walking into a holdup in the post office. It was a rather close shave, fortunately my cameras were in the car.

 

The majority of the people in SA are very friendly, good humored and fun loving, however I would not flash expensive cameras, jewelry or be conspicuous in the cities. My advice is take a decent point and shoot- DLUX4 or similar for the cities. If you're heading out of the cities into the country take your bigger equipment with you and depending on whether you're doing any wildlife photography take a wide and a longer lens with you.

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