Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rob3rt5

Leica Universal Pol. vs. Kenko settup?

Recommended Posts

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Which is better and why?- The Leica Universal Polarizer at a whopping $490.00 or Kenko C-PL w/ finder for $89.00. Will I see a difference and is the Leica filter worth the difference?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best justification I can find for the Leica Universal is peerless optics. In a polarizer shoot out, the number one ranked polarizer was a Slim B+W MRC Kaesemann. It should be noted that this filter is commonly available in 77mm filter thread and not 60mm or smaller for Leica. One could use it with a step-up but it would ultimately get in the way of the rangefinder view. Leica wasn't asked to participate in the shootout but we all know Leica is known for superior lenses and might be considered by most, if not all, to be peerless in this respect. I imagine another victor might have been crowned if B+W's best went up against Lieca's Polarizer.

All Hail the Would BE King!...the Leica Universal Polarizer- Wonderful glass, simple design, easy to use and, if you shop around, available for about half price used. Perfection without compromise- almost. There is one small detail which sort of sucks (just a tiny bit...) the filter is rather large and ungainly when it comes to packing it in a small kit bag for the day.

I guess even perfection has it's price.

Edited by rob3rt5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest imported_torben
Which is better and why?- The Leica Universal Polarizer at a whopping $490.00 or Kenko C-PL w/ finder for $89.00. Will I see a difference and is the Leica filter worth the difference?

Arent you comparing apple and orange? linear vs. circular

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, you should of course buy a linear filter. There is no advantage at all to circular filters on the M camera, as there are no semi-silvered mirrors in the ray path.

 

Second, you should use an ordinary screw-in filter to fit your lens(es). You must learn to use a polarizer of course, but you should do that in any case in order to get the full benefit of it. With the Universal or Kenko outfit -- or with a SLR camera -- you won't learn, because you just twirl the filter until you see something that pleases you. You never know the actual orientation of the filter's polarization, which is crucial.

 

I have already written here about how to ascertain a filter's orientation, and how that relates to the effects you want. You may already know those things, so I won't repeat it all here (being boring is the eighth deadly sin). But If you don't, just let me know.

 

The old man from the Age of the POOMA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have already written here about how to ascertain a filter's orientation, and how that relates to the effects you want.

Could you pls give a link?

Thx ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used both. The Leica Universal-Polfilter is a pain to use, and it does not work with the larger lenses (52mm and above). It is true that Kenko is not the same level as any Leica filters, on the other hand it's not as bad as many would say. The Kenko System works pretty well. Get the filters that fit your lens (or adapt the odd 60mm to 67mm), select your viewer and go. You have the choice of flash mount or hand held viewers, so you don't have to give up your 21mm viewfinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertisement (gone after registration)

Could you pls give a link?

Thx ;-)

Just copy and paste:

 

All right, here we go again. You must first ascertain the direction of polarization. The easiest way to do that is to observe reflected skylight in a pane of glass (stand at c.25 degrees from the plane of the pane, for best effect). Now rotate the filter until the reflection is at a minimum. If the pane was a vertical windowpane, mark the rotating ring at 9 or 3 o'clock. If horizontal, mark it at 12 or 6 o'clock. Make the mark permanent any way you like (I used an engraving point on a Dremel tool).

 

Now, if you want to extinguish or modify reflexes, again orient the filter so that the mark points at 90 degrees from the reflecting surface. E.g. water: 12 'o clock. The same if you want to intensify colours on foliage: they are contaminated by reflected skylight on mostly horizontal surfaces, so the case is similar to water. Want to darken the sky? Point the mark in the direction of the sun. Experiment a bit when holding the filter, and you will soon understand how the filter works. Then you can just slap it on, orient it right, and off you go.

 

Now the filter does not just absorb polarized light, but much other light too. A pola filter can in fact double as a c. 1.5 x neutral density filter! If you meter the exposure through the filter, the resulting exposure will normally be somewhat over. This will destroy expecially a shot with a darkened sky. Bracket, or set exposure without the filter, then adding some 1 1/3 of a stop.

 

The old man from the Age of Mr. Land

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...The Leica Universal-Polfilter is a pain to use, and it does not work with the larger lenses (52mm and above)...

 

Not at all. I have the Leica setup and find it very easy to use. You can flip it up to dial in the effect either over the camera body or through the VF and swing it back down to meter and shoot. There's no lining up numbers/marks on two different filters like with the Kenko.

 

The Leica unit DOES work with 52mm lenses; I use it with my 1,2/35 Nokton! I just leave off the adapter ring and bolt it right onto my UV/IR filter. It's perhaps not as secure as when using the rings since there's no "lip" but it hasn't been a problem for me.

 

It comes down to your lenses. If most have a 39mm, 43mm or 46mm thread then you should be just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all so very much for participating in this thread. I appreciate your input.

It was very nice of you Lars to repost those wonderful instructions on the use of a polarizing filter. I've been using them for some 20 years now but others have not. It's always good to get a refresher- instruct the eye, as it were.

 

It should be noted here that redundant questions posted on this forum are not always due to lack of searching the forum for previous posts- they do not always just pop up when a search is done. I've discovered that it is very crucial that one searches properly for what one wants to know- not always the most intuitive action.

Edited by rob3rt5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not at all. I have the Leica setup and find it very easy to use. You can flip it up to dial in the effect either over the camera body or through the VF and swing it back down to meter and shoot. There's no lining up numbers/marks on two different filters like with the Kenko.

 

The Leica unit DOES work with 52mm lenses; I use it with my 1,2/35 Nokton! I just leave off the adapter ring and bolt it right onto my UV/IR filter. It's perhaps not as secure as when using the rings since there's no "lip" but it hasn't been a problem for me.

 

It comes down to your lenses. If most have a 39mm, 43mm or 46mm thread then you should be just fine.

 

Thats an interesting workaround, but it's not supported by Leica, and it certainly does not fit my Nocti nor my 75mm Lux, Nor my WATE Nor my MATE (49mm adapter will cause vignetting at 28mm).

 

I found it a pain because you first install the adapter, then mount the filter, then flip it up, do your adjusting through the viewfinder, then flip down the filter and then take your picture. Besides it being oversized and cumbersome, it really draws attention, much like the FrankenFinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Either use "Lars Exellent" method with a quality filter or the kenko system. I don't believe the universal will work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, the diameter of the Universal is too small, so no adapter is available. Your best bet is to 'do it my way' (sorry, no audio attachments possible)

 

The old man from the Age of the POOMA, and of Frankie Boy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone know of a solution to use a polarizing filter on the apo-summicron 90mm or first version MATE? Both are 55mm.

 

Yes:

 

I made my own from a step-up ring. It cost me 7.50$ for the ring.15 min. DIY. Not bad

 

Sorry if you saw this before, I did post it sometime ago.

 

/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e32/jaapv/filter.jpg&key=f93fc99b7a64ecf5c4b15878a1f82fa3c0c449b1aabb72df176d0a049b04221d">

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got back from Africa with my MP. Used a B&W 46 mm Kaesemann Linear pol on my 50mm Lux ASPH. Very simply, and I will get my slides back today, I simply rotated it to the point where the left diode in the finder lit up a bit after setting exposure accurately for scene. I imagine at that point the filter was doing its thing. Don't know whether this is a valid procedure but I will find out today. This method is surely a lot simpler than using the universal pol from Leica, and the B&W is always on the lens as protection, too. I wonder if anyone else has tried using a pol this way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tried it that way and found it too inaccurate. The range of maximum polarization is very narrow and the viewfinder LED too twitchy to rely on for that purpose. Just looking through the filter and then screwing it on works best for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just got back from Africa with my MP. Used a B&W 46 mm Kaesemann Linear pol on my 50mm Lux ASPH. Very simply, and I will get my slides back today, I simply rotated it to the point where the left diode in the finder lit up a bit after setting exposure accurately for scene. I imagine at that point the filter was doing its thing. Don't know whether this is a valid procedure but I will find out today. This method is surely a lot simpler than using the universal pol from Leica, and the B&W is always on the lens as protection, too. I wonder if anyone else has tried using a pol this way?

I have, but I found it less than exact. The best way is to orient the polarization at a right angle to the reflecting surface (12 o'clock if it is water) or with the mark pointing in the direction of the sun, if you want to darken a blue sky.

 

The outlook for your slides is nevertheless fairly good.

 

The old man from the Age of POOMA (Pumbah's half brother)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue., Read more about our Privacy Policy