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Jesus stripes

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Haven't seen these before: Vertical venetian-blind-like stripes. Virtually identical image made two sec earlier doesn't have them.

 

M8(.15) with WATE @ 21 mm. Bridge + ACR. Stripes present in DNG, though I boosted 'brightness' to +100 to make them more visible here.

 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks.

 

And Merry Christmas.

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Is it just me? I can't see any vertical artefacts?

 

Ed

 

Nope. I can't see any either. The closest thing to a stripe seems to be those almost horizontal lines in the far distance of the background.

 

 

edit: Oops! I took too long typing again. Now I can see them in Andy's version. Corrugated DNGs

Edited by Nicoleica

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Thanks, Luigi!

 

I've only seen the stripes with this one file. Am still looking.

 

 

On another thread I saw a mention of possible camera-generated artifacts, maybe related to electronic interference due to shutter wind etc. According to EXIF data, the previous file was still being written to card when I snapped this one.

 

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Corrugated DNGs

 

Nicole--Good term, but I kinda like "Jesus stripes" more, in honor of the sculpture's subject.

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The stripes in Howard's original post are easily visible on the two cheap and so far uncalibrated monitors on my PC.

 

What displays were people using on which they weren't visible? (Or is it a matter of operating systems or drivers?)

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Hmmm - haven't seen THAT before, although it looks a bit like the banding both Nikon and Canon had at one point with some SLRs (5Dmk1 and D200 - I think). They blamed it on electronic interference from the AF motors - but I guess that is not the issue with a Leica M (yet!).

 

Card errors usually have shown up as whole bits of the image (or another image) being replicated in a rectangle or diagonal parallelogram.

 

Any chance you were in the sights of an off-shore naval radar or other high-powered radio source? Cell-phone tower hidden in the trees overhead? Etc.

 

A few years ago a sister newspaper of my former workplace started getting scambled wire photos, received via satellite dish on the roof, every day around noon. It turned out the aircraft carriers in the nearby navy yard were testing their primary search radars at noon each day - frying any RF operations elsewhere in the town for a minute or so. Navy had to change procedures and point them out to sea.

 

(No, I don't wear a tinfoil hat, but maybe my M9 should?)

 

------------------

 

John: I could not see them in the original post on a calibrated monitor set to gamma 2.2. Generally calibration tends to darken monitors, especially if the white point is cut from the default of 7-9000°K to 5500-5000°K and the gamma is set to 2.2. Uncalibrated monitors ship brighter (and leave the blue cranked up for even more brightness) since the general, non-photo, public prefers "bright" to "accurate".

 

If I crank the gamma of my screen up to 1.2 or 1.0 (instead of 2.2), and turn off the calibration, the bands in the original are visible.

Edited by adan

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The stripes in Howard's original post are easily visible on the two cheap and so far uncalibrated monitors on my PC.

 

What displays were people using on which they weren't visible? (Or is it a matter of operating systems or drivers?)

 

They are not visible on my calibrated Mac screen, using Safari, which is a colour aware browser. That's why I had to enhance the image in PS to see them.

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Curious, the first stripes are obvious on the 10 yo studio monitor of my G4 Mac here. OS 10.4.11, Firefox 3.5.6 & Safari 4.0.4. Blind love syndrome?

Merry Xmas to all of you BTW.

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John: I could not see them in the original post on a calibrated monitor set to gamma 2.2. Generally calibration tends to darken monitors, especially if the white point is cut from the default of 7-9000°K to 5500-5000°K and the gamma is set to 2.2. Uncalibrated monitors ship brighter (and leave the blue cranked up for even more brightness) since the general, non-photo, public prefers "bright" to "accurate".

 

If I crank the gamma of my screen up to 1.2 or 1.0 (instead of 2.2), and turn off the calibration, the bands in the original are visible.

 

Thanks for the information. I had no idea that calibrating a monitor brought a loss of shadow detail.

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Thanks, Luigi!

 

I've only seen the stripes with this one file. Am still looking.

 

 

On another thread I saw a mention of possible camera-generated artifacts, maybe related to electronic interference due to shutter wind etc. According to EXIF data, the previous file was still being written to card when I snapped this one.

 

Hum... I remember to have obtained something "strange" (no stripes... I can't remember well, but it was something else) in exactly this situation... there must be something obscure glitch when one fires befoer the writing has ended... I always wait for blinking light to stop... even if the rather few times I shot in "continuous mode" nothing strange happened... mysteries of firmware and in-camera processing...

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... Any chance you were in the sights of an off-shore naval radar or other high-powered radio source? Cell-phone tower hidden in the trees overhead? Etc. ...

Andy--

Hmm. Maybe the associated Franciscan Church was in holy commun(icat)ion at the time?

 

Seriously, the statue is in Israel (on the Sea of Galilee), which I'm sure is a hotbed of signals and counter-signals. But I haven't (yet) found the effect on other shots from the same trip. And maybe someone else would have discovered the effect if it were military?

 

Certainly could be some kind of interference, internal or external.

 

 

Luigi--

The card is definitely a consideration, since it was the first use of a new card. But it seems to have recorded fine both before and after this shot.

 

 

 

 

All--

I'm aware of the near invisibility of the stripes. Opening the DNG in ACR, the pattern caught my attention as a set of parallel lines of under-exposed, no-detail black in the "Default" exposure mode.

 

Sorry to have annoyed and got you to comparing monitor settings.

 

I'm just curious what might have caused the pattern.

 

And no, it's an M8, not an M9.

Edited by ho_co

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