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Found 7 results

  1. Leica Camera today introduces the Leica Q2 Monochrom - a digital full-frame camera with a fixed Summilux 28 mm F/1.7 ASPH lens. It is based on the Leica Q2, but has no Bayer filter in front of the sensor, so that the images have a significantly better resolution, dynamic range and image quality at high ISO values. » Jono Slack Leica Q2 Monochrom Review The Leica Q2 Monochrome is now available in stores at $5,995 / £4,995. The Leica Q2 Monochrome at a glance 47 MP CMOS full-format black & white sensor Fixed Summilux 28mm 1:1.7 ASPH. lens Optical setup of 11 lines in 9 groups, 3 aspheres Digital zoom for 35, 50 and 75 mm Electronic viewfinder with 3,68 MP ISO Sensitivity 50 - 100.000 Contrast range 13 EV Shutter speed (mechanical) 60 - 1/2.000 sec Electronic shutter 1 - 1/40.000 sec 4k 30 fps video , FullHD up to 120 fps Dust and splash water protection Dimensions (W x H x D): 130 x 80 x 92 mm Weight 734g (with battery) » Full Leica Q2 Monochrom Specs Leica Q2 Monochrom: The only full frame compact camera with dedicated monochrome sensor. Wetzlar, 10th November 2020. Leica Camera AG presents the Leica Q2 Monochrom – the next-generation model of the Leica Q line of cameras. With a newly developed full-frame monochrome sensor, a fast Leica Summilux 28 mm f/1.7 ASPH. prime lens, fast and precise autofocus and OLED viewfinder technology, the new model not only continues the performance features of the Q2, but also defines new quality standards in black and white photography. The monochrome design of the camera with a new leather covering, matt black paint, gray and white engravings and MONOCHROM lettering on the top is elegant and unobtrusive. The red Leica logo was intentionally omitted on this camera. Like the Leica Q2 the Q2 Monochrom comes with a protective sealing against dust and water spray compiling to the IP52 Standard. The Leica Q2 Monochrom features a exclusively developed 47.3 megapixel full frame monochrome sensor that captures both highly-detailed still pictures and 4K video at ISO sensitivities up to 100,000 and, together with its Leica Summilux 28 mm f/1.7 ASPH. lens, ensures exceptional imaging performance. The fast initial aperture of f/1.7 guarantees optimum picture quality in even the most difficult lighting situations. This all makes the Leica Q2 Monochrom the perfect companion for fans of black and white photography and those who want to become one. The practical locking element for the choice of manual or automatic focusing and simple switching to macro mode with a close focus distance of 17 cm is located on the lens and highlights the greatest possible creative freedom in composing exceptional black-and-white images. Thanks to the extension of the integrated digital zoom function up to 75 mm, users now enjoy even more flexibility for composing their pictures. In addition to the uncropped 28 mm focal length of the camera lens, a crop factor can be chosen to simulate exposures made with focal lengths of 35, 50 or 75 millimetres. The selected crop is displayed as a bright-line frame in the viewfinder and on the rear display panel. The cropped image from the framing selected is saved in JPEG format with correspondingly reduced resolutions of 47.3, 30, 14.7, or 6.6 megapixels. The uncropped image is always saved simultaneously as a DNG file with the full resolution of 47.3 megapixels. The Leica Q2 Monochrom also features an OLED viewfinder with a resolution of 3.68 megapixels. The high resolution provides complete control over the motif at all times and also leads to considerably improved image depth and higher contrast. In contrast to LCD technology, in which only whole sectors of the viewing image can be darkened, the brightness of each individual pixel in the viewfinder of the Q2 is adapted. Despite the high resolution, power consumption remains low. The viewfinder is activated as soon as the camera is brought up to the eye and shows the motif reliably and without any perceptible delay at all times. The autofocus system of the Leica Q2 Monochrom focuses precisely on the subject in less than 0.15 seconds, and makes it one of the fastest cameras in its class. Ongoing improvements to the processor from the Maestro family have enabled a higher sequential shooting rate with an impressive 10 frames per second at the full resolution of 47.3 MP that ensures that the truly wonderful moments in life will never be missed. The range of creative options has been further expanded by the new video mode with 4K resolution. Brilliant, black- and-white video recordings can be made with 3840 x 2160 pixels and frame rates of 30 or 24 fps or, alternatively, in the familiar full HD format with 120, 60, 30 or 24 frames per second. In combination with the Leica FOTOS App, the camera’s integrated Wi-Fi module makes it possible to quickly and easily share pictures via social media, change numerous camera settings from a smartphone or even or even remotely control the shutter release of the Leica Q2 Monochrom. Thanks to Bluetooth LE (Low Energy), a permanent connection is established between camera and smartphone. In its design, the Leica Q2 Monochrom sticks more consequently than almost any other camera to Leica's typical tradition of reduction to the essentials. The ‘Made in Germany’ seal of quality guarantees that only the finest and most resilient materials are employed in its construction. The monochrome design of the new Leica Q2 Monochrom and its classically structured leatherette ensure an optimal interplay of form and functionality. Also new is the camera’s uniquely intuitive handling concept. This is complemented by a unique, intuitive operating concept. The menu structure has been streamlined and adapted to the special features of a monochrome camera. Naturally, all color settings for image and video recording have been omitted and the menu has only been supplemented with settings for tinting black- and-white images (blue, sepia, selenium). A comprehensive range of optional accessories is also available for the Leica Q2 Monochrom. These include, for example, Protectors and carrying straps in premium-quality leather in different colours, as well as bags and wrist straps in various designs. The range also includes technical equipment for the Leica Q2 Monochrom such as the Leica SF 40, SF 60 flash units, the SF C1 remote flash control unit, an additional thumb rest and a handgrip with matching leatherette. Perfectly matched to the camera, three new, specially calculated E49 color filters in yellow, green and orange are available. The Leica Q2 Monochrom is on sale from today at authorised Leica dealers.
  2. Gestern wurde die Leica Q2 Monochrom vorgestellt: Hier sind alle Informationen zur Leica Q2 Monochrom Technische Daten Leica Q2 Monochrom Review von Jono Slack (englisch) Jetzt die Frage an euch: Ist die Leica Q2 Monochrom interessiert für dich? Bitte oben abstimmen und gerne unten weiter kommentieren. Bin auf die Ergebnisse gespannt! Andreas
  3. Bill Claff has published data for Q2 Monochrom: https://www.photonstophotos.net/Charts/PDR.htm#Leica Q2 MONOCHROM
  4. Technische Daten Leica Q2 Monochrom Kameratyp Digitale Kleinbild-Kompaktkamera, Festbrennweite Aufnahmeformat / Seitenverhältnis 24 x 36 mm / 3:2 Objektiv Leica Summilux 1:1,7/28 mm ASPH., 11 Linsen in 9 Gruppen, 3 asphärische Linsen Digitalzoom 28 mm, 35 mm, 50 mm, 75 mm Bildstabilisierung Optisches Ausgleichssystem für Foto- und Video- Aufnahmen Blendenbereich 1,7 bis 16 in 1⁄3 EV-Stufen Bildsensor/Auflösung Vollformat Monochrom CMOS-Sensor, 50,4/47,3 Mio. Pixel (total/effektiv) Dynamikumfang 13 Blendenstufen bei Basis ISO 200 Farbtiefe 14 Bit Foto-Aufnahmeformat Wählbar: DNG, DNG + JPEG, JPEG. DNG-/JPEG-Auflösung Video-Aufnahmen MP4 (C4K/4K/Full HD) Video-Auflösung/ Bildfolgerate 4K: 30 oder 24 B/s. C4K: 24 B/s. Full-HD: 24, 30, 60 oder 120 B/s Ton-Aufnahmeformat AAC Mikrofon Stereo Lautsprecher Mono Speichermedien SD-/SDHC-/SDXC-Speicherkarten. Empfehlung: UHS II Speicherkarten ISO Bereich Automatisch, ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800, ISO 1600, ISO 3200, ISO 6400, ISO 12500, ISO 25000, ISO 50000, ISO 100000 Weißabgleich Automatisch, Voreinstellungen für: Tageslicht, bewölkt, Schatten, Kunstlicht, elektronischer Blitz, Graukarte Farbraum sRGB JPG-Einstellung Kontrast, Schärfe (in jeweils 5 Stufen), Tönung: Sepia, Blau, Selen (in jeweils 2 Stufen schwach / stark) / OFF Scharfeinstellung Arbeitsbereich 30 cm bis ∞, bei Makro-Einstellung ab 17 cm Einstellung Automatische- (Autofokus) oder manuelle Entfernungseinstellung. Bei manueller Einstellung wahlweise Lupenfunktion und Kantenmarkierung (peaking) als Einstellhilfen verfügbar Autofokus-Betriebsarten AFS (Auslösung nur bei erfolgreicher Scharfstellung), AFC (Auslösung jederzeit möglich), AF-Einstellung speicherbar Autofokus- Messmethoden 1-Feld (verschiebbar), Mehrfeld (49 Felder), Gesichtserkennung, wahlweise Einstellung/Auslösung durch Berührung des Monitors. Belichtungs-Betriebsarten Programmautomatik, Zeitautomatik, Blendenautomatik und manuelle Einstellung Belichtungs-Messmethoden Mehrfeld, mittenbetont, Spot Belichtungskorrektur ±3 EV in 1⁄3 EV-Stufen Automatische Belichtungsreihen 3 oder 5 Aufnahmen in Abstufungen bis 3 EV, einstellbar in 1⁄3 EV-Stufen Verschlusstyp Wahlweise mechanisch, elektronisch oder Hybrid Verschlusszeiten 60 s bis 1⁄2000 s mit mechanischem Verschluss, 1 s bis 1⁄40000 s mit elektronischem Verschluss, in 1/3 Stufen, Blitz-Synchronisation bis 1⁄500 s, Linear-Blitzen mit allen kürzeren Verschlusszeiten als 1⁄ 500 s möglich (mit HSS-fähigen, SCA 3002-Standard-Blitzgeräten). Serienaufnahmen Wahlweise 10/5/3 B/s (H/M/L) Selbstauslöser Vorlaufzeit wahlweise 2 s oder 12 s OLED Sucher Auflösung: 1280 x 960 Pixel mal 3 Farben (=3.68 Millionen Bildpunkte). Bildfeld: ca. 100 %, Seitenverhältnis: 4:3, Augenabstand: 21 mm. Einstellbar -4 - +3 Dioptrien, mit Augensensor für automatische Umschaltung zwischen Sucher und Monitor Monitor 3"-TFT-LCD-Monitor mit ca. 1.040.000 Bildpunkte, Berührungssteuerung möglich WLAN Erfüllt Norm IEEE 802.11b/g/n (Standard-WLAN- Protokoll), Kanal 1-11, Verschlüsselungsmethode: WLAN-kompatible WPATM/ WPA2TM, Zugriffsmethode: Infrastrukturbetrieb Bluetooth Bluetooth LE Stromversorgung Leica BP-SCL4 Lithium-Ionen-Akku, Nennspannung: 7.2V Kapazität: 1860mAh Ladegerät Nennspannung 8,4 V; Kapazität mind. 1860 mAh (nach CIPA-Standard): ca. 400 Aufnahmen; Ladezeit: ca. 180 min.; Akku-Ladegerät: 100–240 V 50/60 Hz 0,25 A mit Adaptern Aufnahmen /Akkuladung Ca. 370 Gehäuse Aus leichter und robuster Magnesiumkonstruktion Objektiv-Filtergewinde E49 Stativgewinde A 1/4 DIN 4503 (1/4"). Maße ( B x H x T) 130 mm x 80 mm x 91.9 mm Gewicht 734g / 637g (mit / ohne Akku) Lieferumfang Kameragehäuse, Tragriemen, Gegenlichtblende, Objektivdeckel, Zubehörschuh-Abdeckung, Akku, Ladegerät, Netzkabel (EU, US, lokales Netzkabel), USB- Kabel Software Leica FOTOS App
  5. Technical Specifications Leica Q2 Monochrome Camera type 35 mm digital compact camera, fixed prime lens Format / aspect ratio 24 x 36 mm / 3:2 Lens Leica Summilux 28 mm f/1.7 ASPH., 11 elements in 9 groups, 3 aspherical elements Digital zoom 28 mm, 35 mm, 50 mm, 75 mm Image stabilisation Optical shake compensation system for still picture and video exposures Aperture range 1.7 to 16 in 1⁄3 EV increments Image sensor/resolution Full frame monochrome CMOS sensor, 50.4/47.3 million pixels (total/effective) Dynamic range 13 stops at base ISO 200 Colour depth 14-bit Photo file formats Selectable: DNG, DNG + JPEG, JPEG. DNG/JPEG resolution Video recording formats MP4 (C4K/4K/Full HD) Video resolution/ frame rate 4K:30or24fps.C4K:24fps.FullHD24,30,60or 120 fps Audio recording format AAC Microphone Stereo Speaker Mono Storage media SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards Recommended: UHS II memory cards ISO settings Automatic, ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800, ISO 1600, ISO 3200, ISO 6400, ISO 12500, ISO 25000, ISO 50000, ISO 100000 White balance Automatic, presets for: daylight, cloudy, shade, incandescent, electronic flash, grey card, manual colour temperature selection Colour spaces sRGB JPG settings Contrast, sharpness (in 5 steps each) Tint: sepia, blue, selen (high/low/off) Focusing Working range 30 cm to ∞, close focus distance 17 cm in macro mode Settings Automatic (autofocus) or manual focusing. Loupe function and edge highlighting (focus peaking) in four colours available as focusing aids in manual focusing mode. Autofocus modes AFS (shutter release only after successful focusing), AFC (shutter release possible at any time), AF setting can be saved. Autofocus metering modes Single field (moveable metering point), multi-field (49 fields), face recognition, subject tracking, optional setting/shutter release by touching the monitor screen. Exposure modes Programme AE, aperture priority, shutter speed priority and manual setting Scene modes Automatic, sport, portrait, landscape, night portrait, snow/beach, fireworks, candlelight, sunset, digiscoping, miniature effect, panorama and HDR Exposure metering modes Multi-segment, centre-weighted, spot Exposure compensation ± 3 EV in 1/3-EV increments Automatic exposure bracketing 3 or 5 exposures in steps of up to 3 EV, can be set in 1⁄3 EV increments Shutter type Choice of mechanical, electronic or hybrid Shutter speeds 60 s to 1⁄2000 s with mechanical shutter, 1 s to 1⁄40000 s with electronic shutter, in 1/3 increments, Flash synchronisation up to 1⁄500 s, linear flash with all shutter speeds faster than 1⁄500 s (with HSS-capable SCA 3002 flash units). Continuous shooting Choice of 10/5/3 fps (H/M/L) Self-timer delay 2 or 12 seconds OLED viewfinder Resolution: 1280 x 960 pixels x 3 colours (= 3.68 megapixels). Viewfinder image: approx. 100%, aspect ratio: 4:3, eye-relief: 21 mm. Adjustable between -4 and +3 dioptres, with eye-sensor for switching between viewfinder and monitor screen Monitor screen 3" TFT LCD monitor screen with approx. 1,040,000 image dots, touch control capability WLAN IEEE 802.11b/g/n compliant (standard WLAN protocol), channels 1-11, encryption method: WLAN-compatible WPATM/WPA2TM encryption; access mode: infrastructure mode Bluetooth Bluetooth LE Power supply Leica BP-SCL4 lithium-ion battery, rated voltage: 7.2V, capacity: 1860 mAh Charger Rated voltage 8.4 V; capacity at least 1860 mAh (according to CIPA standard): ca. 400 exposures; charging time: approx. 180 min.; battery charger: 100–240 V, 50/60 Hz, 0.25 A, with adapters Exposures per battery charge Approx. 370 Body Robust, lightweight magnesium alloy construction Lens filter thread E49 Tripod bush A 1/4 DIN 4503 (1/4" thread). Dimensions (W x H x D) 130 mm x 80 mm x 91.9 mm Weight 734g / 637 g (with / without battery) Package includes Camera, carrying strap, lens hood, lens cap, accessory shoe cover, battery charger, mains power cable (EU, US, local power cable), USB cable. Software: Leica FOTOS App
  6. Introduction Today Leica have announced the Q2 Monochrom camera. This is their 4th monochrome camera over the last 8 years, it is especially interesting as it is the first non-rangefinder camera with a black and white sensor. I think it’s worth starting with a little history of monochrome cameras. Back in the early days of digital capture - Kodak ruled the world with cameras costing tens of thousands of dollars, In 1991 they they introduced the DCS 100 DM3 with a 1.3mp monochrome sensor; this was based on the Nikon F3 camera, and it had a separate DSU (Digital Storage Unit) which went over the photographer’s shoulder (and was extremely heavy). It cost around $25,000. There is a fascinating article about it at Nikonweb (see references at the end of this article). In those days the demosaicing process was not as good as it is now, and that camera produced 2 or 3 times the definition of the normal colour version. Combined sales of the colour and monochrome version was apparently 987 cameras. In 2001 they produced a 6mp black and white sensor behemoth based on the Nikon F5. The Kodak DCS 760M. By now there was competition from Nikon with the D1 and D1x and the price was a slightly more manageable $8000. There is a very good write up of this camera by Pete Myers on Luminous Landscape . Sadly Kodak completely failed to capitalise on their head start in digital imaging, and especially the concept of a monochrome camera. Despite producing the first full frame dSLR in 2002, by 2005 they were out of the professional camera market altogether, the last camera being the DCS Pro SLR/n in 2004 (I had one, it was a fine camera, if a little quirky! But they never shipped the monochrome version). Leica had great success with their M8 and then full frame M9 digital cameras and the idea of making a monochrome version of the M9 seemed a bold and interesting move. I had a test camera in April 2012, and was lucky enough to be at an exciting launch of the M9 Monochrom in November 2012 in Berlin. I still have and use my own M9 Monochrom, it was, and still is a great camera. The 24mp M246 Monochrom was announced on April 30th 2015. The M10-Monochrom on January 17th 2020 with a new 40mp sensor, and now, less than a year later we have the Q2 Monochrom with a 47mp sensor derived from that in the Q2 (and SL2). I only had the Q2 Mono for around 3 weeks for testing last August, Covid 19 meant that I couldn’t do any trips with the camera, but I took the time to look carefully at its performance in comparison with SL2 (which has essentially the same sensor but with a Colour Filter Array). As usual I should emphasise that my job with Leica is as a camera tester, and my responsibility is to report problems to Leica (which I certainly do!). On the other hand I would never miss out anything which seemed to me to be critical. I don’t get paid for writing these articles (either directly or indirectly). I’m not told what to write, and although I do show the articles to Leica first for fact checking that is all that they do. Why a Monochrome Camera? Technical reasons With a colour digital camera the sensor itself can only detect the intensity of light, but it has a colour filter array to allow it to create colour images. The process of converting the image to colour is called demosaicing - This calculates the colour for each pixel based on the colour filter, and the results from the surrounding pixels in groups of 4. The colour filter array reduces the amount of light reaching the pixels by around 1 stop, and the demosaicing process has an effect on the resolution because of the combining of information. With a Monochrome camera, you don’t need the colour filter array, This means that each pixel gets the maximum amount of light thus improving the high ISO characteristics of the camera and the dynamic range. As there is no demosaicing process there is no loss of resolution - each pixel is represented directly in the final image. Of course, there are also downsides: Many of us have become used to converting colour files to monochrome using the channel mixer in our processing software. This, in effect, allows us to apply filters to our images after the event. With a monochrome camera, if you want a red filter, you need to put it on the lens rather than relying on your computer. Another issue is that, despite the higher dynamic range, it’s more important to ensure that you don’t overexpose bright areas. With a colour camera you can usually extract some detail from one of the other colour channels, with a monochrome camera, once it’s blown out there is nothing to recover! This is slightly exacerbated by the higher base ISO of the sensor (usually twice that of an equivalent colour sensor). Photographic reasons Demosaicing techniques have improved over the years, and although there is an obvious improvement in resolution without a colour filter array, it’s not quite as sensational as it was when the M9 Monochrome appeared in 2012. Added to which 47mp resolution should be quite enough for most uses. But having spent a lot of time with all of the Leica Monochrom cameras over the years I’ve come to think that the most important reason for shooting with one is how it changes one’s approach as a photographer. For me at least it makes me think much more about the structure and composition of an image. With the previous M Monochrom cameras, shooting normally with the rangefinder you did still see the subject in colour, the Q2 Mono takes this a step further in that you see the motif in black and white through the viewfinder. You start to think in black and white! Body and Design Leica’s design department have gone from strength to strength making increasingly beautiful and functional cameras, the Q2 Monochrom is no exception, and with its grey and white markings it is indeed handsome. From a functional and operational point of view, with the exception of the obvious lack of White Balance controls, the grey lettering and the changed ISO values, the Monochrom is identical to the standard Q2. The Lens The lens is the same as the Q and Q2: If it isn’t broke - don’t fix it! It’s a wonderful lens, compact and very sharp, it does soften up a bit at the corners, especially at wide aperture, but most of the frame is pin sharp right from f1.7. A simple twist of the lens engages Macro Mode and changes the distance gauge in the most delightful way. Close focus is 30cm in normal and 17cm in Macro mode. Controls The aperture ring is on the lens with the shutter speed on the top plate (just like the Leica M cameras). This makes the camera seem very familiar, Both the Aperture and shutter speed dials have an A position. A on both = Program Mode A on shutter dial = Aperture Priority A on Aperture dial = Shutter Priority A on neither = Manual exposure 3 function buttons can be assigned as needed, and the now familiar Leica rear buttons with Play, Function and Menu are all present. Personally, I would have liked to see a joy stick like the SL and SL2. The Digital Zoom Digital zoom is something of a dirty word in the photography world, probably from the days when small megapixel cameras offered gravelly shots at apparently extended focal length. The Q2 Monochrom is a bit different because the base resolution is so high, and because the implementation is so good, and so consistent with the Leica rangefinder. Implementation of crop mode or digital zoom in other cameras usually involves the EVF / LCD zooming in, with the Q2 Mono, as with the Q2, you can change between 4 focal lengths using the zoom / Lock-button. Choosing a longer focal length simply puts framelines in the display showing what you are going to get. If you shoot JPG files then that is exactly what you do get. If you shoot DNG then the image is not actually cropped. However, if you use Lightroom or Lightroom Classic, then the DNG file appears in cropped form (you can use the crop tool to change or remove the cropping in post processing). The four digital zoom modes are: 28mm 8368 x 5584 47mp . effective aperture f1.7 35mm 6704 x 4472 30mp . effective aperture f2 50mm 4688 x 3128 14.6mp effective aperture f2.8 75mm 3136 x 2096 6.6mp . effective aperture f4.6 “Effective aperture” refers to the depth of field effect” I think this is a great feature, and with the increased resolution of the Q2 Mono it makes the 50mm crop zone perfectly usable and the 75mm okay at a pinch (especially as the lens is so sharp). Of course, it doesn’t actually turn the lens into a different focal length, but the aspect ratio of the resulting image is exactly the same. What you lose is the depth of field relating to the cropped focal length. Basically this will always be the same as that of a 28mm f1.7, so it’s harder to use bokeh to isolate the subject. Due to the big demand for review cameras I don’t have a camera in front of me, but if you want more details then please refer to my original review of the colour Q2. Image comparisons During the test period I didn’t have either an M10 Monochrom, or a Q2, both of which would have made interesting resolution comparisons. However, my old friend and partner in crime Sean Reid is doing a very detailed comparison of these three cameras. More about that later. I thought it was interesting to compare the Q2 Monochrom to three of Leica’s recent high resolution colour cameras, the M10, the M10-R and the SL. Of course the lens used is an issue in that one can’t do a real oranges and oranges comparison. In this case I’ve used the 28 Summilux Asph M for the M10 and M10-r and the SL 24-90 at 28mm on the SL2. Images were all shot as DNG and the colour images were converted to black and white in Adobe Lightroom. For all these tests the camera was set on a sturdy tripod with a 2 second shutter delay. To try and limit focus variances shots were all taken at f5.6. The shutter speed was allowed to vary to ensure that the images were as consistently exposed as possible. Here is a full example of the test scene: Resolution Of course I’ve shot hundreds of images, but in terms of the resolution I thought it was more sensible to do a resolution test at 200 ISO. I’ve used the centre of the frame (roughly) for the comparison. The M10 and M10-R Images have been upsized in photoshop so that it they are the same size as those from the other two cameras. In addition to this resolution comparison I did a series of shots of a hedge at about 10 metres at different apertures. Sadly there was some movement in the hedge, and on some of the shots there are obvious signs of blurring. I no longer have the Q2 Mono, so I can’t redo them, but although most of each frame is very sharp, it isn’t all perfect and I think that posting examples might be misleading, added to which they are very boring! However what I found was that the Q2 Monochrome shots had an obvious advantage in the centre at all apertures, with a real magical presence to the files, at f1.7 and f2.8 the Q2 Mono was slightly softer at the corners than either the SL2 or the M10-R. Stopped down a little more the corners were about even, but even at f8 the Q2 Mono still showed an obvious advantage in terms of presence and detail. High ISO Performance Base ISO on the Q2 Monochrom is 200, there is also a pull option of ISO 1oo. For this test I did comparisons at the following ISO values 200 ISO 800 ISO 1600 ISO 3200 ISO 6400 ISO 12,500 ISO 25,000 ISO 50,000 ISO 100,000 ISO (Q2 Monochrome only) I loaded the groups of 4 DNG files directly into photoshop, magnified them to 100% and then taken a screen shot and labelled it. Looking at these comparisons it’s very clear that the Q2 Monochrome has considerable advantage over the other 3 cameras, especially as the ISO value increases and at higher ISO values it’s probably about 1.1/2 stops better. Together with the higher resolution this is obviously going to be a real advantage shooting in very low light. It’s quite remarkable how much detail there is, even in the 100,000 ISO shot, even the banding is very well controlled. An impressive performance. Conclusion Sadly, because of Covid restrictions and the relatively short time I had the camera I didn’t manage do any street photography, and precious little portrait photography either. Hopefully with the results of the Pfizer vaccination test yesterday we will all be on the move again before too long! The Q cameras have been a real success story for Leica and a perfect example of their talent for finding a photographic niche and making it their own. The only real competitor has been the Sony RX1R II with a 35 mm lens, but Sony have not updated this since 2016 (which, with their rapid product cycles sounds like they’ve abandoned it). I have to admit to starting off feeling that in this day of 48mp resolution there wasn’t really a need for a monochrome version of the Q2, but actually I have been quite captivated. The superb high ISO performance is a real bonus shooting in low light and gives one extra flexibility in normal light. The resolution might not be needed, but the look of the files is so wonderfully clean and ‘present’. I think that this camera is going to be a real hit with street and travel photographers, indeed, anyone who shoots primarily in black and white. Acknowledgements Special thanks to Peter Kruschewski and Stefan Daniel at Leica camera for supplying the test camera and answering questions. Thanks also to Emma who has to put up with me moaning and bellyaching when I write these articles. References Sean Reid has done a great deal of comparative testing with the Q2 Monochrome. He is planning to publish 4 articles over the next few days on his site reidreviews.com. it is a subscription site, but very much worth the modest fee, Sean doesn’t do any dramatic ‘teasers’, he doesn’t have any brand allegiances and I really feel that he is doing the most useful and honest testing of cameras today. Review based on extensive field testing as well as studio comparison tests of rendering and noise levels (at various ISO settings) for the Q2M, Q2 and M10M with 28/1.4 Summilux ASPH Studio resolution and vignetting tests comparing the Q2M, Q2 and M10M with 28/1.4 Summilux ASPH Field and studio comparisons of how the Q2M renders tonality with each of the three Leica colour filters A studio comparison test of highlight headroom and usable dynamic range for the Q2M, Q2 and M10M with 28/1.4 Summilux ASPH Jarle Aasland’s article on the DCS 100 on NikonWeb http://nikonweb.com/dcs100/ Peter Myers review of the Kodak DCS 760m at Luminous Landscape www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/kodak-760m.shtml Jim Garvey’s article The DCS Story 1987-2004 http://nikonweb.com/files/DCS_Story.pdf Jonathan Slack’s review of the Leica Q2 https://www.slack.co.uk/leica-q2.html Jonathan Slack’s review of the Leica M10 Monochrom https://www.slack.co.uk/leica-m10-monochrom.html Leica Q2 Monochrom Sample Images
  7. Leica Camera stellt heute offiziell die Leica Q2 Monochrom vor – eine digitale Vollformat-Kamera mit fest eingebautem Summilux 28 mm F/1.7 ASPH. – ausschließlich für Schwarzweiß-Fotografie. Sie basiert auf der Leica Q2, verzichtet aber auf den Bayer-Filter im Sensor, so dass die Bilder eine deutlich bessere Auflösung, Dynamikumfang und Bildqualität bei hohen ISO-Werten aufweisen. » Jono Slack Leica Q2 Monochrom Review (englisch, Beispielbilder und ISO Vergleich) Die Leica Q2 Monochrom ist ab sofort im Handel verfügbar und soll 5.590 € kosten. Die Leica Q2 Monochrom auf einen Blick 47 MP CMOS Vollformat-Sensor Fest eingebautes Summilux 28mm 1:1,7 ASPH. Objektiv Lichtstärke 1:1,7 Optischer Aufbau aus 11 Linsen in 9 Gruppen, 3 Asphären Digitalzoom mit Einstellungen für 35, 50 und 75 mm Elektronischer Sucher mit 3,68 MP Empfindlichkeit ISO 50 – 100.000 Kontrastumfang 13 Blendenstufen Verschlusszeiten (mechanisch) 60 – 1/2.000 sek Elektronischer Verschluss 1 – 1/40.000 sek 4k Video bis 30 fps, FullHD bis 120 fps Staub und Spritzwasser-Schutz Abmessungen (B x H x T): 130 x 80 x 92 mm Gewicht 734g (mit Akku) » Technische Daten Leica Q2 Monochrom Leica Q2 Monochrom: Die einzige Vollformat-Kompaktkamera mit echtem Monochrom-Sensor. Wetzlar, 10. November 2020. Die Leica Camera AG stellt das neueste Modell innerhalb der Leica Q-Reihe vor: Die Leica Q2 Monochrom. Mit ihrem neu entwickelten monochromen Vollformat-Sensor, dem lichtstarken Objektiv Leica Summilux 1:1,7/28 mm ASPH., dem schnellen, präzisen Autofokus und dem hochauflösenden OLED–Sucher führt sie die Leistungsmerkmale der Q2 weiter und definiert darüber hinaus neue Qualitätsstandards in der Schwarzweiß-Fotografie. Das monochrome Design der Kamera mit einer neuen Belederung, matt schwarzer Lackierung, grau und weiß ausgelegten Gravuren sowie einem MONOCHROM Schriftzug auf der Oberseite ist elegant und unaufdringlich. Auf das rote Leica Logo wurde bei dieser Kamera ganz bewusst verzichtet. Genau wie die Leica Q2 ist auch die Q2 Monochrom mit einem Staub- und Spritzwasserschutz nach IP 52 Standard ausgestattet. Die Leica Q2 Monochrom verfügt über einen exklusiv entwickelten 47,3 Megapixel- Vollformat-Schwarzweiß-Sensor, der sowohl äußerst detailreiche Bilder bis ISO 100.000 als auch 4K-Videos aufzeichnet und zusammen mit dem Leica Summilux 1:1,7/28 mm ASPH. für eine herausragende Abbildungsleistung sorgt. Die große Anfangsöffnung des Objektivs von 1:1,7 garantiert dabei selbst in schwierigen Lichtsituationen eine optimale Bildqualität. Damit wird die Leica Q2 Monochrom zur perfekten Begleiterin für Liebhaber der Schwarzweiß-Fotografie. Der einfache Wechsel zum Makromodus mit einer Naheinstellungsgrenze von 17cm direkt am Objektiv und die Wahl zwischen automatischer und manueller Fokussierung durch eine praktische Arretierung unterstreichen die größtmögliche kreative Freiheit bei der Komposition außergewöhnlicher Schwarzweiß-Aufnahmen. Dank des integrierten Digitalzooms von bis zu 75mm sind Anwender bei der Bildgestaltung noch flexibler. Der Bildausschnitt kann entsprechend der Brennweiten von 28, 35, 50 oder 75 Millimeter gewählt werden und wird im Sucher und auf dem Monitor in Form eines Leuchtrahmens angezeigt. Die Speicherung des gewählten Ausschnittes erfolgt als JPEG in der beschnittenen Auflösung von 47,3, 30, 14,7 oder 6,6 Megapixel. Das DNG wird dabei immer als Gesamtbild in voller Auflösung von 47,3 Megapixel gespeichert. Die Leica Q2 Monochrom ist mit einem OLED-Sucher mit einer Auflösung von 3,68 Megapixel ausgestattet. Die hohe Auflösung ermöglicht jederzeit die volle Kontrolle über das Motiv und führt zudem zu einer deutlich besseren Bildtiefe und einem erhöhten Kontrast: Im Sucher der Q2 wird die Helligkeit jedes einzelnen Bildpunktes angepasst – im Gegensatz zur LCD-Technologie, bei der nur ganze Bildbereiche verdunkelt werden können. Trotz der hohen Auflösung bleibt der Stromverbrauch niedrig. Der Sucher wird aktiviert, sobald die Kamera am Auge ist und zeigt das Motiv jederzeit zuverlässig und ohne wahrnehmbaren Zeitversatz an. Der Autofokus der Leica Q2 Monochrom stellt in weniger als 0,15 Sekunden präzise scharf und ist damit einer der Schnellsten seiner Klasse. Auch bei der Serienbildgeschwindigkeit überzeugt der Prozessor aus der Maestro-Familie: Mit 10 Bildern pro Sekunde bei voller Auflösung von 47,3 MP lassen sich die besonderen Momente jederzeit festhalten. Weitere Möglichkeiten für ganz besondere Schwarzweiß-Filme ergeben sich durch den Videomodus mit 4K-Auflösung. Gestochen scharfe Aufnahmen können mit 3.840 x 2.160 Pixeln und Bildraten von 30 bzw. 24 Bildern oder alternativ im bekannten Full-HD-Format mit 120, 60, 30 bzw. 24 Bildern pro Sekunde aufgezeichnet werden. Dank des integrierten Wi-Fi-Moduls lassen sich in Kombination mit der Leica FOTOS App Bilder jederzeit schnell in sozialen Netzwerken teilen, viele Parameter der Kamera mit dem Smartphone einstellen oder die Leica Q2 Monochrom sogar aus der Distanz auslösen. Durch Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) besteht eine permanente Verbindung zwischen Kamera und Smartphone. In ihrem Design hält die Leica Q2 Monochrom so konsequent wie kaum eine andere Kamera an der für Leica typischen Tradition der Reduzierung auf das Wesentliche fest. Das Gütesiegel „Made in Germany“ garantiert dabei die Verwendung von Materialien mit höchster Langlebigkeit. Das monochrome Design der neuen Leica Q2 Monochrom und ihre klassisch strukturierte Belederung sorgen für ein optimales Zusammenspiel von Form und Funktionalität. Hinzu kommt ein einzigartiges, intuitives Bedienkonzept. Die Menüstruktur wurde verschlankt und an die Besonderheiten einer monochromen Kamera angepasst. So wird naturgemäß auf alle Farbeinstellungen für Bild- und Videoaufzeichnung verzichtet und das Menü lediglich mit Einstellungen für die Tönung von Schwarzweiß-Aufnahmen (Blau, Sepia, Selen) ergänzt. Für die Leica Q2 Monochrom ist optional ein umfangreiches Zubehör-Sortiment erhältlich. Hierzu gehören unter anderem hochwertige Leder-Protektoren und Tragriemen in unterschiedlichen Farben sowie Taschen und Handschlaufen in verschiedenen Ausführungen. Technisches Equipment für die Leica Q2 Monochrom wie die Blitzgeräte Leica SF 40, SF 60 und SFC1 sowie eine zusätzliche Daumenstütze und ein Handgriff mit passender Belederung ergänzen das Angebot. Optimal abgestimmt auf die Monochrom-Kamera, stehen zusätzlich drei neue Farbfilter in Gelb, Grün und Orange mit einem E49 Filtergewinde zur Verfügung. Die Leica Q2 Monochrom ist ab sofort im Leica Fotofachhandel für eine unverbindliche Preisempfehlung von 5.590 Euro erhältlich.
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