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Beresford

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About Beresford

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    Neuer Benutzer
  • Birthday 06/06/1952

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    United Kingdom

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  1. Good luck! Your pics are always worth viewing.
  2. A touch of that wonderful painter from Bologna: Giorgio Morandi. But then, he has been an inspiration to many of my favourite photographers.
  3. People say that the f1 Noctilux works well with the M9. That is my experience too. This is one of the first shots I made with my new (to me) f1. Roses in the evening light in the oak panelled dining room.
  4. What a poignant and beautiful use of the out of focus quality of this lens.
  5. In the first place this is a lovely photograph: the colours and the shapes both harmonious and varied; but it answers for me a question which I have been wondering about when using the Noctilux wide open. Where should one focus? I don't suppose there is a universal rule, but a rule of thumb is a start. I suppose it is the same with a portrait: focus on the nearest eye. While I am on the subject of my enjoyment of this photograph, its colour palette makes me think it could have been painted by a Dutch flower painter. Being so out of season I hope they were a gift for a happy occasion.
  6. They used to bring a cake stand to your table. You could eat as many as you liked (or were able), and when the waitress came to bring you your bill she would count the ones which were left and charge accordingly. The cake stand would then be refilled and taken to the next table. The less toothsome pastries might overhear the conversation of half a dozen tables before the day was out. Sadly, I think, modern hygiene regulations have rationalised the tradition. Great photo, by the way. Lovely colours.
  7. This picture make one ache for early summer.
  8. You are right. But I bought my M2 & my M3 off eBay, with broken shutters. Easily fixed by a competent repair man. So I have grown rather fond of them. And I have an M-A which I bought new, so I couldn't get rid of that. It is as if I have two 'adopted' Leicas and one 'birth' one. I mean, who could make such a decision? No! I appreciate your advice; but my mind is resolute. Anyway, it is time to stop worrying too much about equipment, and get out there making pictures. But thank you for your suggestion.
  9. Thank you all for your thoughts and advice. I have found them extremely useful. Buying and using a camera, and then making a photograph is a complex combination of tactile and emotional feelings as well as a scientific and aesthetic decision. (Not all conscious all of the time, thank goodness!). I have not wanted to make this a 'Which is better, digital or film?' discussion. It was simply, What to do with my M9? I carefully considered (as several of you suggested) the Leica offer of a discount on a new camera. The CL looked tempting, and there are some lovely CL pictures here on this
  10. I am sorry. You are quite right. It is easy (for me) to become so self obsessed that you think everyone else knows what you really meant. Your advice is straightforward - and helps me to move forward. That you.
  11. Ah! I don't think I expressed myself clearly: My M9 is beginning to show signs of corrosion. Would anyone want it?
  12. There have been other threads about the rights and wrongs of Leica and their inability to replace the sensor. Now I have to acknowledge that my M9 is no longer a reliable camera. What should I do? I am not hugely attracted to the trade-in offers—I can't really afford to take them up, and I don't really want another camera which will become unrepairable some years down the line. Now that I am retired my film Ms give me pleasure. So, do I just put my M9 on eBay and take what I can? Would any dealer take it in part exchange for, say, another lens? Or do I just use it to keep the door aj
  13. I am glad that Leica develop new and improved versions of the M camera as I am sure that they will fulfil the needs of different photographers. For myself, my M-A and a handful of older film Leicas happily take the wonderful lenses sporting that little red dot.
  14. You are so encouraging! I recently bought a Noctilux f1 and am not finding it easy to use. Work like this is inspiring.
  15. It is always worth putting a UV filter on your lens when photographing in an apiary. The little darlings will walk all over your lens leaving marks. Do they lick it or is it their grubby feet? Great picture, by the way. The light is excellent. Though the bee keeper handling the frame could get an aching back leaning over so much. Physically hard, hive work.
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