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bencoyote

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  1. Haha
    bencoyote got a reaction from Alberti in Accelerated brassing   
    For anyone looking for that "old pro" look or to garner respect granted people in the Leica community who pull out a brassed camera, one that has the authentic look of years heavy use (not one of those pre-brassed faux Black Chrome" special editions). i seem to have inadvertently stumbled across a method of accelerated brassing which surprisingly rapidly begins to give your camera an authentic brassed look.
     
    The technique is actually quite simple. You run to a place where you are going to shoot while carrying the camera in a conventional backpack. It seems that friction of nylon while being gently jostled thousands of times while running to your shooting location gently removes the surface paint in all the locations frequently seen on the cameras of old pro's who have taken their Leicas to dozens of countries and shot for a multitude of magazines for years. 
     
    You too can project the image of being a old grizzled pro without having to go through the effort of actually having to travel to far away destinations and shoot in dangerous situations or go through the bother of satisfying clients or even having to edit through thousands upon thousands of pictures. You can just pull out your elegantly brassed Leica with aplomb take a few shots and everyone will know that you have captured the magic in the moment and that there is some greatness in those few frames you have captured.
     
    ;-) 
  2. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from Jeffry Abt in Once you have hardware, SUPPORT is what makes pro camera   
    Probably the most important thing for a professional camera is real support.
     
    Leica has great hardware but so much of the camera these days really comes down to software. They NEED to support the hardware platform over time with good solid software support. When bugs are found, they need to track them and fix them.
     
    I hope by by making this a professional camera with so many of its features targeted at the pro market,  they are building in the cost of long term support into the price of the camera. I really hope Leica understands that they can't deploy such a large portion of their software engineering team to the next product. They need to reserve a portion of them to current products and have them responding to customer feedback and fixing bugs.
     
  3. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from Michael Markey in Outstanding bugs - Manual focus issue   
    One thing that I've found working in open source software for a long time is that there is the way that things are intended and expected to be used by the developer and the testing department which is often initially guided by the original software author. And then as you increase the number of users they have different ideas about how things should work and do things in truly unexpected ways. This leads to uncovering all sorts of new bugs. I don't know how many times I've gotten a bug report and I look at and think, "they are doing what? Does that even work?"
     
    Your way of shooting, MF with a quick succession of shots sounds seems very unusual. It sounds to me like just like that sort of problem that would be overlooked by the developer and a testing department.
     
    Good SW engineering/support would be:
    1) track the bug
    2) prioritize the bug
    3) fix the bug
    4) confirm the fix 
    5) add a test to the overall plan
    6) release the fixed firmware
     
    and in general release often with small numbers of changes seems to be the best way to catch unintended problems with a fix or a new feature and keeping customer satisfaction high.
  4. Thanks
    bencoyote got a reaction from martinot in Accelerated brassing   
    For anyone looking for that "old pro" look or to garner respect granted people in the Leica community who pull out a brassed camera, one that has the authentic look of years heavy use (not one of those pre-brassed faux Black Chrome" special editions). i seem to have inadvertently stumbled across a method of accelerated brassing which surprisingly rapidly begins to give your camera an authentic brassed look.
     
    The technique is actually quite simple. You run to a place where you are going to shoot while carrying the camera in a conventional backpack. It seems that friction of nylon while being gently jostled thousands of times while running to your shooting location gently removes the surface paint in all the locations frequently seen on the cameras of old pro's who have taken their Leicas to dozens of countries and shot for a multitude of magazines for years. 
     
    You too can project the image of being a old grizzled pro without having to go through the effort of actually having to travel to far away destinations and shoot in dangerous situations or go through the bother of satisfying clients or even having to edit through thousands upon thousands of pictures. You can just pull out your elegantly brassed Leica with aplomb take a few shots and everyone will know that you have captured the magic in the moment and that there is some greatness in those few frames you have captured.
     
    ;-) 
  5. Haha
    bencoyote got a reaction from Steve Ricoh in Accelerated brassing   
    For anyone looking for that "old pro" look or to garner respect granted people in the Leica community who pull out a brassed camera, one that has the authentic look of years heavy use (not one of those pre-brassed faux Black Chrome" special editions). i seem to have inadvertently stumbled across a method of accelerated brassing which surprisingly rapidly begins to give your camera an authentic brassed look.
     
    The technique is actually quite simple. You run to a place where you are going to shoot while carrying the camera in a conventional backpack. It seems that friction of nylon while being gently jostled thousands of times while running to your shooting location gently removes the surface paint in all the locations frequently seen on the cameras of old pro's who have taken their Leicas to dozens of countries and shot for a multitude of magazines for years. 
     
    You too can project the image of being a old grizzled pro without having to go through the effort of actually having to travel to far away destinations and shoot in dangerous situations or go through the bother of satisfying clients or even having to edit through thousands upon thousands of pictures. You can just pull out your elegantly brassed Leica with aplomb take a few shots and everyone will know that you have captured the magic in the moment and that there is some greatness in those few frames you have captured.
     
    ;-) 
  6. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from M9reno in Thoughts on 90mm Elmarit f2.8   
    The APO Summicron is an interesting lens. It seems to be nearly technically flawless. One poster above suggested that it can have CA, without doubting him in any way, I'm going to say that I've never seen that. It seems perfect in every way to me. If there is a weakness, then weaknesses ends up being intrinsic in its application in the rangefinder concept and my own abilities.
     
    Leica photographers tend to work at human scale and they tend to work at the distance where you do need to focus a lens rather than rack it to infinity. There is kind of a feeling with Leica lenses where they are designed to be shot wide open. If you do that with the APO Summicron wide open then your depth of field ends up being so narrow that it may not be effective compositionally. You get things like the nose or ear out of focus problem. It can also be a challenge to keep it focused with just the subtle almost imperceptible movement forward or back that all human's make. So what you find yourself doing is stopping down a couple of stops.
     
    However when you step back and use it more like a wide angle lens incorporating context around your subject just from a distance then you have more depth of field but it becomes more difficult to focus because the fine details with contrast sufficient to focus are smaller in the viewfinder. When you are approaching the level of light where you want to use f/2 to keep your ISO reasonable, your eye begins to struggle to pick them out.
     
    So I find that the 90mm at f/2 is approaching a balance and tipping point where the fundamental limitations of telephoto photography and the rangefinder concept begin to break down. Both of those points when taken together really make me wonder about the actual utility of the additional stop of light gathering at f/2 over f/2.8 when used on a rangefinder.
     
    I feel like in some ways the APO-Summicron is the brother to the Noctilux, the epitome of optical perfection that lives right at the edge of what is possible within the rangefinder camera system, and just like the Noctilux for people used to lightness and compact design of RF lenses, it feels too big and heavy for everyday use (but in comparison to a SLR lens, it's not really that big.)
     
    As an educational experience, the 90mm f/2 is fabulous. It lets you step over the edge and into a frontier where sometimes things don't always work as you hope they would. And by doing so, you come to realize why you don't want to do that. For that I feel as though I've gotten my money's worth. I believe that someday down the road, I'll find myself buying the Macro-Elmar as a more practically usable walk around short telephoto lens.
     
    I want to end by saying I am in no way trying to damn with faint praise. I love the APO-Summicron. I just think it is worth considering some points above in light of your own photography.
  7. Thanks
    bencoyote got a reaction from a5m in Thoughts on 90mm Elmarit f2.8   
    The APO Summicron is an interesting lens. It seems to be nearly technically flawless. One poster above suggested that it can have CA, without doubting him in any way, I'm going to say that I've never seen that. It seems perfect in every way to me. If there is a weakness, then weaknesses ends up being intrinsic in its application in the rangefinder concept and my own abilities.
     
    Leica photographers tend to work at human scale and they tend to work at the distance where you do need to focus a lens rather than rack it to infinity. There is kind of a feeling with Leica lenses where they are designed to be shot wide open. If you do that with the APO Summicron wide open then your depth of field ends up being so narrow that it may not be effective compositionally. You get things like the nose or ear out of focus problem. It can also be a challenge to keep it focused with just the subtle almost imperceptible movement forward or back that all human's make. So what you find yourself doing is stopping down a couple of stops.
     
    However when you step back and use it more like a wide angle lens incorporating context around your subject just from a distance then you have more depth of field but it becomes more difficult to focus because the fine details with contrast sufficient to focus are smaller in the viewfinder. When you are approaching the level of light where you want to use f/2 to keep your ISO reasonable, your eye begins to struggle to pick them out.
     
    So I find that the 90mm at f/2 is approaching a balance and tipping point where the fundamental limitations of telephoto photography and the rangefinder concept begin to break down. Both of those points when taken together really make me wonder about the actual utility of the additional stop of light gathering at f/2 over f/2.8 when used on a rangefinder.
     
    I feel like in some ways the APO-Summicron is the brother to the Noctilux, the epitome of optical perfection that lives right at the edge of what is possible within the rangefinder camera system, and just like the Noctilux for people used to lightness and compact design of RF lenses, it feels too big and heavy for everyday use (but in comparison to a SLR lens, it's not really that big.)
     
    As an educational experience, the 90mm f/2 is fabulous. It lets you step over the edge and into a frontier where sometimes things don't always work as you hope they would. And by doing so, you come to realize why you don't want to do that. For that I feel as though I've gotten my money's worth. I believe that someday down the road, I'll find myself buying the Macro-Elmar as a more practically usable walk around short telephoto lens.
     
    I want to end by saying I am in no way trying to damn with faint praise. I love the APO-Summicron. I just think it is worth considering some points above in light of your own photography.
  8. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from peterv in S-ADAPTER L on T   
    Yeah you're really going to need a lot of in-software correction to fix all those optical defects in those cheap S lenses when you use them on a high resolution camera like the T. I'm just sure the vignetting is going to be awful. ;-)
     
    Seriously though, I would find it fairly likely that the camera-lens communication protocol is going to be the same. More than likely the signaling protocol between the body and the lens was probably first invented for the S and then reused with modification for the T and then SL. So I think that shouldn't be much of a problem. What I would worry about are more subtle things like the maximum current that the body's battery will be able to deliver. Being able to slew the larger focus elements quickly may demand more current than the T's battery can deliver. I'm not saying that is the case but those are the kinds of problems that I would expect.
     
    I would first talk to Leica and then before I bought it, I would drop into a Leica store and try it out before I bought it. It would be kind of fun. Of course there would also be a lot of purpose shifting in the lenses. For example, your fairly standard 70mm suddenly will become a pretty reachy telephoto.
  9. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from Letin in Thoughts on 90mm Elmarit f2.8   
    The APO Summicron is an interesting lens. It seems to be nearly technically flawless. One poster above suggested that it can have CA, without doubting him in any way, I'm going to say that I've never seen that. It seems perfect in every way to me. If there is a weakness, then weaknesses ends up being intrinsic in its application in the rangefinder concept and my own abilities.
     
    Leica photographers tend to work at human scale and they tend to work at the distance where you do need to focus a lens rather than rack it to infinity. There is kind of a feeling with Leica lenses where they are designed to be shot wide open. If you do that with the APO Summicron wide open then your depth of field ends up being so narrow that it may not be effective compositionally. You get things like the nose or ear out of focus problem. It can also be a challenge to keep it focused with just the subtle almost imperceptible movement forward or back that all human's make. So what you find yourself doing is stopping down a couple of stops.
     
    However when you step back and use it more like a wide angle lens incorporating context around your subject just from a distance then you have more depth of field but it becomes more difficult to focus because the fine details with contrast sufficient to focus are smaller in the viewfinder. When you are approaching the level of light where you want to use f/2 to keep your ISO reasonable, your eye begins to struggle to pick them out.
     
    So I find that the 90mm at f/2 is approaching a balance and tipping point where the fundamental limitations of telephoto photography and the rangefinder concept begin to break down. Both of those points when taken together really make me wonder about the actual utility of the additional stop of light gathering at f/2 over f/2.8 when used on a rangefinder.
     
    I feel like in some ways the APO-Summicron is the brother to the Noctilux, the epitome of optical perfection that lives right at the edge of what is possible within the rangefinder camera system, and just like the Noctilux for people used to lightness and compact design of RF lenses, it feels too big and heavy for everyday use (but in comparison to a SLR lens, it's not really that big.)
     
    As an educational experience, the 90mm f/2 is fabulous. It lets you step over the edge and into a frontier where sometimes things don't always work as you hope they would. And by doing so, you come to realize why you don't want to do that. For that I feel as though I've gotten my money's worth. I believe that someday down the road, I'll find myself buying the Macro-Elmar as a more practically usable walk around short telephoto lens.
     
    I want to end by saying I am in no way trying to damn with faint praise. I love the APO-Summicron. I just think it is worth considering some points above in light of your own photography.
  10. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from IkarusJohn in I posted this on the M10 area but I'd like to let SL observers see it.   
    Agreed but I feel like the limiting factor in digital photography these days is not pixels or iso, it is dynamic range. That’s still one where big wells matter. The other one is sensor read out speed which affects AF, the refresh rate of an EVF, as well as video performance. I think that this is one place Sony (and maybe Nikon and Canon - I don’t know) did it right with the 7, the 7R, 7S for different types of shooters.
  11. Like
    bencoyote reacted to johnbuckley in I posted this on the M10 area but I'd like to let SL observers see it.   
    If one is in a position to own both, it's worth it.  Everyone will have different needs at different times, but for me, the M10 is the camera I use walking around cities, and the SL is the camera I use for landscapes and specific purposes, including portraits.  I love the freedom of walking out the door with the highly capable M.  And I love having a tool like the SL after 15 years of using an M exclusively.
     
    Both cameras have downsides, if not limitations.  The SL is a pretty big camera to walk around with.  The M lacks certain capabilities.  As a pair, they are awesome, and I cannot imagine foregoing one for the other, and pray I never have to choose.
  12. Like
    bencoyote reacted to Irakly Shanidze in Tripod Head for the Leica SL   
    This is as good as it gets: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1175122-REG/gitzo_gh1382tqd_series_1_traveler.html?ap=y&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIioKQ--_n2wIVxsDACh0IzAyjEAYYASABEgJND_D_BwE&smp=y
  13. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from helged in Dive Housing   
    I've heard that Subal has a dive housing for the Leica SL. http://www.subal.com/a445c98c2c1/Housing/UW_Housings/Sony_Leica/SL.aspx
     
    I also found that BS Kinetics can make one. https://bskinetics.com/?lang=en
     
    Has anyone tried either of these?
     
  14. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from helged in Dive Housing   
    For this trip I'm taking an Olympus TG-5 with an Ikelite housing, and a GoPro Hero 6 with a SuperSuit. If I get notably more into underwater photography, I will look into one of those other two options along with the 16-35mm. I couldn't budget in all the additional gear for the SL for this trip. Plus with both of these, as you suggested I'll be making cheap mistakes.
     
    I also looked for something like the SuperSuit for the Leica X-U couldn't find one. To me that seems like a nice combination. 
     
    However since this is a question that may be answered by only a very few people in the world, I thought I would ask expecting it to linger for a while before I got an answer.
     
    I do think that the SL is potentially a good camera for underwater use. Its few buttons and simple interface should make designing a waterproof housing easier. My TG-5 has 9 buttons on the back, 2 on the top including the shutter, two wheels to turn and a zoom lever. The SL on the other hand has 3 on the top, 5 on the back, two wheels, the on/off switch and joystick. So fewer case penetrations than even a compact camera.
  15. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from phongph in Any desire for a macro lens for the SL?   
    I for one wish there were one.
    I also wish there were focus bracketing when there is one because I can’t slew through the focal range as fast or accurately as the camera can.
     
    In the meanwhile there is the TL 60mm which may actually be advantageous due to the slightly larger DOF. The obvious cost is resolution.
  16. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from Linford in Any desire for a macro lens for the SL?   
    I for one wish there were one.
    I also wish there were focus bracketing when there is one because I can’t slew through the focal range as fast or accurately as the camera can.
     
    In the meanwhile there is the TL 60mm which may actually be advantageous due to the slightly larger DOF. The obvious cost is resolution.
  17. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from lx1713 in Dive Housing   
    For this trip I'm taking an Olympus TG-5 with an Ikelite housing, and a GoPro Hero 6 with a SuperSuit. If I get notably more into underwater photography, I will look into one of those other two options along with the 16-35mm. I couldn't budget in all the additional gear for the SL for this trip. Plus with both of these, as you suggested I'll be making cheap mistakes.
     
    I also looked for something like the SuperSuit for the Leica X-U couldn't find one. To me that seems like a nice combination. 
     
    However since this is a question that may be answered by only a very few people in the world, I thought I would ask expecting it to linger for a while before I got an answer.
     
    I do think that the SL is potentially a good camera for underwater use. Its few buttons and simple interface should make designing a waterproof housing easier. My TG-5 has 9 buttons on the back, 2 on the top including the shutter, two wheels to turn and a zoom lever. The SL on the other hand has 3 on the top, 5 on the back, two wheels, the on/off switch and joystick. So fewer case penetrations than even a compact camera.
  18. Like
    bencoyote reacted to tom0511 in Dive Housing   
    Interesting that there are options available. Personally underwater I use m43 (EM1), I feel better to not have $10k inside the housing, also there are macro and Fisheye options available. Also I find the larger DOF can sometimes be an advantage underwater.
    Sorry for not really answering your question.
  19. Like
    bencoyote reacted to Jeff S in Tape over big "LEICA" name on the front of the SL?   
    It's often just for a cleaner aesthetic, the same reason I prefer a black dot to a red one. Nothing to do with discretion, which has to do with the photographer, not the camera (except for LF).
     
    Jeff
  20. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from AlanYWM in SL Lens Tally: What More do we Need?   
    I got a really nice shot of the moon last night with the 90-280 but I had to crop in a huge amount leaving me with only a 526x526 px image. Never the less it is lovely. This really does leave me wishing for something longer. I've also been doing a lot of birds lately and though the 280mm is good for the large well habituated shorebirds and water fowl that live next to the mult-use trail near my house, i still have to crop in a lot. Away from where I live birds are much harder to shoot with only a 280mm
     
    I guess that I could attach the SL up to an actual telescope or a spotting scope.
    Or I could get a vintage Telyt R lens. The Leica R-L adapter costs as much as the lens but I guess that I could get a cheaper Kipon.
     
    The point is there are still a couple gaps in the SL lens lineup.
    Macro
    Very long telephoto
    Some wide AF lenses.
    A wide TS (Tilt Shift) lens for architecture.
     
    None of these are impossible to work around and these special purpose lenses probably won't ever have the volume of general purpose lenses like a fast 50 or a standard zoom or telephoto.
  21. Like
    bencoyote got a reaction from dkCambridgeshire in SL Lens Tally: What More do we Need?   
    I got a really nice shot of the moon last night with the 90-280 but I had to crop in a huge amount leaving me with only a 526x526 px image. Never the less it is lovely. This really does leave me wishing for something longer. I've also been doing a lot of birds lately and though the 280mm is good for the large well habituated shorebirds and water fowl that live next to the mult-use trail near my house, i still have to crop in a lot. Away from where I live birds are much harder to shoot with only a 280mm
     
    I guess that I could attach the SL up to an actual telescope or a spotting scope.
    Or I could get a vintage Telyt R lens. The Leica R-L adapter costs as much as the lens but I guess that I could get a cheaper Kipon.
     
    The point is there are still a couple gaps in the SL lens lineup.
    Macro
    Very long telephoto
    Some wide AF lenses.
    A wide TS (Tilt Shift) lens for architecture.
     
    None of these are impossible to work around and these special purpose lenses probably won't ever have the volume of general purpose lenses like a fast 50 or a standard zoom or telephoto.
  22. Like
    bencoyote reacted to Irakly Shanidze in External power for SL?   
    It is essential for video, and I wish SL had USB-C. While in most cases having three fully charged batteries and two chargers will do the trick, it is the absence of an external power option that makes me pass on assignments like long concerts, conferences, etc.
  23. Like
    bencoyote reacted to lx1713 in External power for SL?   
    External power is not needed by most people but important. I will never say no if the system provided for such an option particularly if it's non proprietary like a USB-C port.
  24. Like
    bencoyote reacted to gvaliquette in SL Lens Tally: What More do we Need?   
    APO-Extender(s), 2X and 1.4X!
  25. Like
    bencoyote reacted to jplomley in SL Lens Tally: What More do we Need?   
    I'm curious what other SL users are interested in seeing Leica deliver as the lens arsenal is being slowly rolled out? Myself, I see the 16-35, 70 APO and 90-280 being a brilliant 3 lens kit for my applications. The only lens missing would be a 100 mm Macro that allows 1:1 magnification.
     
    What SL lenses would other users like to see Leica deliver?
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