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250swb

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Everything posted by 250swb

  1. There is a theory on another camera forum that Leica's were sent to Japan by submarine during the war. There is also the story that a Tiger tank was transported in component form to Japan by submarine. There is perhaps a nugget of truth buried in all the stories that makes people think 'ah, it must have been delivered by submarine'.
  2. Nothing wrong with Kenko filters, on the other hand it will be a coated lens so tougher. I tend not to use a UV filter because it's a pain to have to take that off to put a coloured filter on for B&W.
  3. Well that's a new one on me. A common cause of stiff focusing is that over the years the torque of mounting the lens causes the flange to twist back and forth and the screws loosen slightly causing the flange to go off-centre. It's just a case of loosening all the screws and retightening them gradually. I'd certainly try that before bending the springs in the lens mount.
  4. How do lens mount springs effect the looseness or stiffness of lens focusing , they aren't connected?
  5. 'King of Bokeh' author Mike Johnston has since significantly backtracked on this opinion given the unwarranted hysteria generated.
  6. Still can't see in my imagination what you are seeing in your prints, actually the results look worse.
  7. I'll cross post from a necro thread I just replied to for your information because it concerns the meter in the M6 and MP (both early and late) 'The EV range of the M6 (the one where you can't get the meter repaired) is EV0 to EV20, and it uses two triangles in the display. When the M6TTL (the one that can still be repaired) was introduced the EV went up to EV-2 to EV20 and the display uses two triangles and a dot between them. So it's not even the same metering circuit between the M6 and M6TTL. The early MP, according to my manual has an EV range of EV-2 to EV20, so the same as the TTL, plus the same display. This is the same as Leica's published data (2006) for the MP after they changed the dial from the M6 style of dial. So when the camera repairer says the meter for the M6 can't be repaired they literally mean the M6, not M6TTL or MP early dial or MP late dial. '
  8. The EV range of the M6 (the one where you can't get the meter repaired) is EV0 to EV20, and it uses two triangles in the display. When the M6TTL (the one that can still be repaired) was introduced the EV went up to EV-2 to EV20 and the display uses two triangles and a dot between them. So it's not even the same metering circuit between the M6 and M6TTL. The early MP, according to my manual has and EV range of EV-2 to EV20, so the same as the TTL, plus the same display. This is the same as Leica's published data (2006) for the MP after they changed the dial from the M6 style of dial. So when the camera repairer says the meter for the M6 can't be repaired they literally mean the M6, not M6TTL or MP early dial or MP late dial.
  9. Why does hiding the battery in the baseplate equate to a doubling of the value? Unless you only fondle your camera. But putting the battery in the baseplate of a film M would be a nightmare with all the extra light seals necessary to change the battery if you were halfway through a film! Have you even half thought through what you just said?
  10. My imagination thinks you have got it wrong, prove me wrong.
  11. After many years of using Epson printers I switched to Canon because my Epson's kept clogging up and requireing either an official maintenance visit or regular head cleaning. I don't print everyday, or even every week, but my Canon just fires up and works each time. I also find the ink management better with my Canon Pro10, and I haven't yet found a situation when the prints are inferior for B&W or colour compared to my Epson's. So while there may be a recommendation for keeping everything working all I can say is that sitting next to a radiator my Canon shrugs it off. For example my printer has never needed a head cleaning session, so the lack of a maintenance tank possibly shows Canon's confidence in their product.
  12. It's easy to find this MP3 on the internet, it has had some fake 'brassing' done to it but for what reason I can't imagine.
  13. I'm not sure why people think XP2 is fussier to develop, there are essentially only two temperatures, use the lowest, and after choosing that only one set time for each film when you follow the instructions for compensating for developer exhaustion. Gone are the mind boggling developer and development time battles over film processing, take your brain out and follow the C41 kit instructions, they work!
  14. I think the Plustek is the way to go for 35mm, anything larger and the Epson definitely, but try a comparison. To my mind it's a little bit like printing a 35mm negative using a cold cathode enlarger head, the light source is soft and diffused which doesn't often suit the grain and contrast of a 35mm negative, and likewise with the V850 it's a diffuse light source. The Plustek should also have more DR and do a higher resolution without interpolation.
  15. I don't like Lightroom. I started filing negatives over forty years ago and the basic structure was simply transferred when I started to use Photoshop and storing scans onto hard drives. Later when Lightroom was released it wasn't what it is today, it was very much sold to busy photographers adopting digital cameras for the first time and needing an idiot proof system that didn't loose images in the bowels of their PC or allow them to overwrite files in their race for productivity. It was designed for millennials whose war cry was/is 'I haven't got the time'. So I tried Lightroom and found it limited in it's editing facilities, and also pointless because I knew where all my pictures are anyway, so kept on using Photoshop and Bridge. Over the years Lightroom has evolved and it far exceeds its original form, but its nannying about 'non-destructive editing' and such like is still irritating, almost like photographers have no common sense and need saving from themselves. I do think that if the photographer is super busy, sending images as they happen on location, downloading wedding pictures, etc. Lightroom still fits the original brief very well.
  16. I'm unsure what you want to argue about? No it isn't vulcanite, yes it can peel, but I will say that no it isn't endemic. I guess ultimately you just wanted to say you are a savvy buyer, be happy with yourself.
  17. You've seen it, so how often? Unless you are recording exceptional cases? I said it would be 'unusual', so the buyer has to consider how the camera has been used in the past and even if it has already been recovered, often a sign when the the covering starts to peel off after being poorly applied. It's an expensive purchase, worth questioning unless 'it has never happened to me' rules the day.
  18. I think I can see a difference, but then I only have my imagination to go on based on your results.
  19. It isn't vulcanite on an M7, so just peel it off carefully and re-cover. The thing to consider in your purchase is if an M7 covering is coming off (very unusual) is this a sign the camera has been otherwise buggered around with in the past, so to speak.
  20. The 'traditional' way is to think of it like your actual physical negative folder, you number, notate, and date each negative sheet with a pen ( I also note film, developer, times etc.). So create a folder with a sequential number, abbreviated description, and date. Upload your contact sheet there. Then within this folder create a sub folder called maybe 'full res scans' and keep the file numbers the same because those will be .TIFF and not JEPG as in the contact sheet. You then make a final folder called maybe 'edit' where you work on your final scans on until you are happy and save the file with the original file name but with a suffix, so maybe 'file name-version 1' , change something and call it 'version 2', etc. So your contact sheet and full res scan and edited scans are all contained within the master folder in a known place on your hard drive. And you can then create another sub folder that includes different size files, again keeping the root name the same but with a suffix. To call up your contact sheets and edited scans use Adobe Bridge and if you need to add tags for quick reference you can do that by using Adobe Bridge.
  21. The traditional use for contact sheets as a record is for accuracy and posterity, not as an ephemeral guide. If two shots have a subtle difference in composition they can be closely accessed on a proper digital contact sheet and the best chosen, otherwise the photographer is doomed to scanning two images to make the choice, if each takes ten minutes (or more) for a full res scan that means one of them has wasted the photographer ten minutes. If faced with a 36 exposure film it doesn't take long before the photographer starts to wish they'd done it right in the first place. But maybe a Flextight would cut scanning time down, is that the answer, 😄 ?
  22. 'Stitching'? The software dumps all the scans into the folder you create to save them in. As for 'two scans', the V850 comes with two sets of negative holders so you scan one and then when it's done the next one is loaded and immediately available. The Epson Scan software does also invert both colour and B&W negatives, which saves a lot of time compared with the hard work of getting accurate results by inverting in Lightroom.
  23. If I were you I'd use Epson Scan instead of Vuescan with the V850, as I said earlier it's so, so easy to rotate scans in the preview screen before doing the final scan. Of course one other mega advantage of having a V850 is that it does medium format scans suitable for exhibition (but not 35mm), so you can now start looking for that Rolleiflex, or a 'Texas Leica', or...... 😃
  24. It looks like there is a jack plug socket for either power or connecting to something else, so is this a piece of lab equipment made by Leitz (not Leica)?
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